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KDE

KDE and Akademy

Filed under
KDE
  • A Frank Look at Simon: Where To Go From Here

    As I had previously announced, I am resigning my active positions in Simon and KDE Speech.

    As part of me handing over the project to an eventual successor, I had announced a day-long workshop on speech recognition basics for anyone who’s interested. Mario Fux of Randa fame took me up on that offer. In a long and intense Jitsi meeting we discussed basic theory, went through all the processes involved in creating and adapting language- and acoustic models and looked at the Simon codebase. But maybe most importantly of all, we talked about what I also want to outline in this blog post: What Simon is, what it could and should be, and how to get there.

  • Akademy 2015: An awesome experience.

    So this was my very first Akademy, and I was excited about attending it ever since the beginning of when I started contributing to KDE a couple of years back. Feels great to have finally made it. Although I had some visa problems at the New Delhi airport because of which I reached A Coruna quite late and missed out on the entire first day of the conference, still I’m glad I could at least reach Rialta by sunset of that day and be able to attend the rest of all the days at Akademy.

  • Kubuntu Podcast #3 - Akademy 2015
  • Fiber Update; WebEngine vs CEF

    I also spent a good chunk of my time reading Qt and KDE coding guidelines and documentation on how files and classes should be structured, and then I applied that information to Fiber. The result now is well commented code, and consistent naming conventions in-line with other Qt/KDE projects.

  • Report from Akademy 2015

    A week has passed since I’ve been back from Akademy, so it’s more than time to make a little report.

  • Akademy 2015 – an unforgettable experience

KDE: A Frank Look at Simon: Where To Go From Here

Filed under
KDE

As I had previously announced, I am resigning my active positions in Simon and KDE Speech.

As part of me handing over the project to an eventual successor, I had announced a day-long workshop on speech recognition basics for anyone who’s interested. Mario Fux of Randa fame took me up on that offer. In a long and intense Jitsi meeting we discussed basic theory, went through all the processes involved in creating and adapting language- and acoustic models and looked at the Simon codebase. But maybe most importantly of all, we talked about what I also want to outline in this blog post: What Simon is, what it could and should be, and how to get there.

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Critical Intel Graphics Driver Bug Puts KDE Plasma 5 in a Really Bad Light

Filed under
KDE

On August 5, Martin Sandsmark informed us all that there's a critical bug in the Intel graphics stack leading to a huge number of crashes for all users of the latest KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

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The New KDE "Fiber" Web Browser Deciding Between Qt WebEngine & Chromium

Filed under
KDE

A few weeks back we wrote about Fiber, yet another web-browser for Qt/KDE, while today there's a bit more information.

KDE developer Ken Vermette who has been working on the Fiber project provided a brief update today. He's been refactoring the existing code to fit Qt/KDE guidelines while now he's trying to decide on the browser layout/rendering engine.

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Qt Purchasing Module Might Come To Qt 5.6 For Offering In-App Purchases

Filed under
KDE

Qt Purchasing is a module designed to help app developers handle in-app purchases. At present this module supports integration with the app stores on Apple iOS and Android, while there's already a patch pending to integrate support for the OS X App Store too. Other app store back-ends could be implemented for Windows, any Linux app store, etc.

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KDE and Akademy

Filed under
KDE
  • Zanshin 0.2.2 transition release

    Three years, five months and eleven days... yes, it's the elapsed time since our last release announcement. But don't despair! We're still alive and kicking.

    We've been busy working on our next release which is much more ambitious than the previous one. As part of this future release, we had to adjust a bit how we store some information. That is why today we are announcing a transitional minor release.

    Behold Zanshin 0.2.2!

  • All the yummies at Akademy 2015
  • Fruits of Akademy

    For the second time I had the chance to attend Akademy, this time in cold and rainy La Coruña. It has been a week of interesting talks, good food (except for one Tortilla incident), and hacking.

    [...]

    KRunner History is Back

    Supposedly this was one of the reason I still saw quite a few people running Plasma 4 during the conference but now there’s no more reason not to do the switch! Wink

Tanglu 3 Distro Comes with Linux Kernel 4.0, GNOME 3.16, and KDE Plasma 5.3

Filed under
KDE
Linux
GNOME

Today, August 4, Matthias Klumpp was extremely happy to announce the release of the final version of his Tanglu 3 GNU/Linux distribution, dubbed Chromodoris Willani and based on the latest stable Debian GNU/Linux operating system.

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Leftovers: KDE/Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • Randa - Bring Touch to KDE

    About a year ago, we talked with several people who were going to work together in Randa, Switzerland. These people were united by a love of KDE and had common motives—to make KDE technology better and have tons of fun while doing it!

    The 5th edition of the Randa Meetings high in the Swiss Alps in August 2014 was a huge success, with many new features and major new additions to KDE technology, through the dedicated efforts of about 50 KDE developers taking a week out of their busy lives to bring great software to users.

  • Unity 8 And KDE May Coexist On The Future Versions Of The Ubuntu Desktop

    The Ubuntu and KDE developers are working together at making Unity 8 and KDE coexist, permitting the users to have both the two desktop environments on the same system.

  • GCompris at Akademy 2015
  • Randa Meetings 2015 – The countdown begins
  • KDE.org Redesign

    KDE Frameworks, Plasma desktop, and our community have a rich history of nearly twenty years in creating great open-source software, making us a truly historic organisation of passionate developers; and along with that history some of our online infrastructure has begun to show its age. The KDE.org website and its various sections are the front door to the KDE ecosystem, it is how people new to KDE will judge us and it’s where our developers, translators, artists, and community members know their hard work will be presented to the world.

  • Akademy 2015 – Phones, CI, and Kubuntu

    Akademy always starts off with two days of ever so exciting talks on a number of engaging subjects. But this year particularly interesting things happened courtesy of Blue Systems.

Leftovers: KDE/Qt

Filed under
KDE

Unity 8 and KDE Will Be Able to Coexist on the Same Ubuntu OS

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

Unity 8 promises to be an evolution over the current Unity version, and it's a profoundly different piece of software. Yes, it brings a lot of new features and improvements, but it will also create a lot of issues. Like the ability to install a different desktop environment alongside, such as KDE.

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More in Tux Machines

Amazon Linux 2 - Who nicked my cheese?

So far, it's a relatively benign, easy introduction to a new operating system that blends the familiar and new in a timid package. Perhaps that's the goal, because a radical offering would right away scare everyone. Amazon Linux 2 is an appealing concept, as it gives users what Red Hat never quite did (yet) - A Fedora-like bleeding-edge tech with the stability and long-term support of the mainstay enterprise offering. But then, it also pulls a Debian/Ubuntu stunt by breaking ABI, so it will be cubicle to those who enjoying living la vida loco (in their cubicle or open-space prison). Having lived and breathed the large-scale HPC world for many years, I am quite piqued to see how this will evolve. Performance, stability and ease of use will be my primary concerns. Then, is it possible to hook up a remote virtual machine into the EC2 hive? That's another experiment, and I'd like to see if scaling and deployment works well over distributed networks. Either way, even if nothing comes out of it, Amazon Linux 2 is a nice start to a possibly great adventure. Or yet another offspring in the fragmented family we call Linux. Time will tell. Off you go. Cloud away. Read more

Updates From OpenIndiana and LibreOffice (Projects That Oracle Discarded)

  • Migration to GCC 6.4 as userland compiler
    Modulo some minor details, the transition of our userland to GCC 6 is complete.
  • OpenIndiana Has Upgraded To The GCC 6 Compiler
    The OpenSolaris/Illumos-based OpenIndiana operating system has finally moved past GCC 4.9 as its base user-land compiler and is now using GCC 6.4. This comes while GCC 8.1 should be officially released in the next few weeks and they are already targeting GCC 7.3.0 as their next illumos-gate compiler.
  • LibreOffice 6.0 Open-Source Office Suite Passes 1 Million Downloads Mark
    The Document Foundation announced recently that its LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite reached almost 1 million downloads since its release last month on January 31, 2018. That's terrific news for the Open Source and Free Software community and a major milestone for the acclaimed LibreOffice office suite, which tries to be a free alternative to proprietary solutions like Microsoft Office. The 1 million downloads mark was reached just two weeks after the release of LibreOffice 6.0, which is the biggest update ever of the open-source office suite adding numerous new features and enhancements over previous versions.

FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown (and Hugs)

  • FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown
    Landing in FreeBSD today was the mitigation work for the Meltdown and Spectre CPU vulnerabilities. It's taken a few more weeks longer than most of the Linux distributions to be re-worked for Spectre/Meltdown mitigation as well as DragonFlyBSD, but with FreeBSD Revision 329462 it appears their initial fixes are in place. There is Meltdown mitigation for Intel CPUs via a KPTI implementation similar to Linux, the Kernel Page Table Isolation. There is also a PCID (Process Context Identifier) optimization for Intel Westmere CPUs and newer, just as was also done on Linux.
  • FreeBSD outlaws virtual hugs
  • AsiaBSDCon 2018 Conference Programme

Linux: To recurse or not

Linux and recursion are on very good speaking terms. In fact, a number of Linux command recurse without ever being asked while others have to be coaxed with just the right option. When is recursion most helpful and how can you use it to make your tasks easier? Let’s run through some useful examples and see. Read more