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Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.2: KDE 4.3 Experience

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KDE
SUSE

opensuse.org: The KDE 4 experience in openSUSE has been enhanced daily, and while the desktop environment itself has matured significantly since the last release, there has been a constant focus to provide an outstanding delivery of it in openSUSE 11.2.

Lancelot: An Alternative KDE Menu

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KDE
Software

maketecheasier.com: Many KDE 3 users swear by the K menu and would dare anyone to challenge it with something better. Lancelot is a third-party menu that has now entered into the KDE fold. It is the one I use, and many others have found it pretty useful. In this post, I will present to you some of Lancelot’s features so that you can decide if it is right for you.

Just another way of browsing your files

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KDE
Software

trueg.wordpress: The Zeitgeist guys created a fuse file system called zeitgeistfs. It is basically a calendar containing the files accessed at that specific date. So at the Akonadi meeting last weekend, having two hours to kill, I thought that should be doable with KIO. So two hours later (most of that time was spent twiddling with UDS entries) the timeline:/ KIO slave was up and running:

Learning to love KDE 4 (part III)

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KDE

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: To conclude this mini series on KDE 4 I'm going to let you on a few tips and tricks I've picked up in the course of my explorations. Note that all comments apply to Kubuntu 9.10 and KDE 4.3. You distro mileage may vary!

KDE at Ontario Linux Fest

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KDE

my.opera.com: What a day it was! So many people are curious about KDE4, and KDE in general. So many are eager to give it a[nother] shot. My throat hurts from all the explaining, demonstrating, screaming and laughing.

KDE4 Demonstrates Choice Is Not A Usability Problem

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KDE

kdenews.org: A few days ago we found a nice blog post on the usability approach taken by the KDE community for the KDE 4 series. We have contacted the author to see if he was interested in doing a guest article for the dot expanding on his blog post.

two simple things to improve the kde user experience

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KDE

aseigo.blogspot: There's a lot of discussion about user experience around these days. That's good, though sometimes the focus is kept on solving "big issues" and a lot of the small everyday type things get missed.

Why KDE Sucks

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KDE

thelinuxexperiment.com: My absolute first experience with KDE – about a week and a half ago, for this experience – did not start well. Upon initial boot, I discovered that I had absolutely no sound. Great, I thought!

Who Needs Windows 7 When You've Got KDE?

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KDE

earthweb.com: As a devoted free software user, I'm almost as likely to stick my hand down a running garbarator as buy a copy of Windows 7. In fact, so far, I haven't tried Windows 7. But if its features list is any indication, I'm missing little that I don't already have with the latest version of the KDE desktop.

comparing "KDE 4" and "GNOME 3"

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KDE
Software

aseigo.blogspot: There is small trend currently to write a blog entry or article comparing "KDE 4" and "GNOME 3". Now, I'm not involved in the least with the GNOME 3 efforts (no big surprise there, I'm sure) so I can't and won't comment on what they are doing now or in the future (they can do so themselves quite well), but there are two interesting points I keep seeing raised that I really do want to address ...

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