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Events (Recent)

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Protocols Plugfest Europe 2015

    Last week I had the pleasure of speaking at Protocols Plugfest Europe 2015. It was really good to get out of the bubble of free software desktops where the community love makes it tempting to think we’re the most important thing in the world and experience the wider industry where of course we are only a small player.

  • GNOME Asia 2015

    I was in Depok, Indonesia last week to speak at GNOME Asia 2015. It was a great experience — the organisers did a fantastic job and as a bonus, the venue was incredibly pretty!

  • [Event-Report] rootconf-2015

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE

Qt - 20 years leading cross-platform development

Filed under
Development
KDE

Today we celebrate 20 years since the first release of Qt was uploaded to sunsite.unc.edu and announced, six days later, at comp.os.linux.announce. Over these years, Qt evolved from a two person Norwegian project to a full-fledged, social-technical world-wide organism that underpins free software projects, profitable companies, universities, government-related organizations, and more. It's been an exciting journey. From the early days of Trolltech in 1999, through an evolution of licensing (from the original FreeQt, to QPL, to GPL, to LGPL today), corporate cooperation from Nokia and Digia, Open Governance, and leading edge technology refinements, Qt has supported the spirit of free software, thriving communities, and high quality products.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed with KDE Plasma 5.3 Becomes Reality, Team Prepares for GCC 5.0

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

The openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling release version of the famous operating system has moved to KDE Plasma 5.3, and it looks like it's a smooth transition, although any help from the community is always welcomed.

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Also: openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Defaults To KDE Plasma 5.3

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Google Summer of Code 2015 – Week Zero: My Project Proposal

    I am going to be adding ‘Constellation Art’ unto the sky map in KStars. This project is precisely what I have been looking for, a perfect blend of astronomy and coding – the best of both worlds!

  • Interview with Evgeniy Krivoshekov

    I think it was when I started using Linux about 3-4 years ago. Or when I found out about the artist David Revoy and read about Krita on his website.

  • GCompris Fundraiser

    The work on unified graphics for GCompris was completed in the time allocated by the fundraiser. Here is a video to show the result.

Basic code completion for Rust in KDE's Kate (and later KDevelop)

Filed under
KDE

A few days ago the Rust community announced v1.0 of their new systems programming language, Rust. Having followed the project for some time and finally having used the language for a number of small projects this year, I've come to feel that using Rust is interesting, fun and productive. I'd like to highly encourage everyone to give it a look now that it's finally considered ready for prime time.

To aid the effort I've put some Sunday hacking time into a basic Rust code completion plugin for Kate today. It's built around Phil Dawes' very nifty Racer, freeing it up to concern itself only with exposing some configuration and getting data provided by Racer into Kate. Not difficult at all.

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Netrunner 16 'Ozymandias' is here -- the best KDE Linux distro gets better

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

One of the wonderful things about Linux distributions is the various desktop environments available. Unlike Windows and OS X, if you do not like the user interface, you can simply change it. I am a big fan of GNOME 3, but I know that many people dislike it. That's OK -- different strokes for different folks as they say.

Another desktop environment I like, and recommend to many, is KDE Plasma. The latest version, Plasma 5, is wonderful, and former Windows users will feel comfortable with it. Today, the best KDE distribution, Netrunner, reaches version 16. Dubbed "Ozymandias", it embraces KDE Plama 5.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Uses KDE Plasma 5.3 as Default Desktop

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

openSUSE has just announced today, May 16, the immediate availability of the KDE Plasma 5.3 as the default desktop environment in Tumbleweed, along with the KDE Applications 15.04.1 software suite.

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KDE Applications 15.08 Planned For Release On 19 August

Filed under
KDE

For those tracking the development of KDE Applications 15.08, the release schedule has now been firmed up. The feature freeze is to take place on 22 July along with the beta release, the KDE 15.08 RC release on 5 August, and the official KDE Applications 15.08 release is set for 19 August.

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Direct: Schedules - Applications - 15.08 Release Schedule

Also: Qt Gamepad: Adding Gamepad Support To The Toolkit

Qt 5.5 Beta Released

Filed under
KDE

It’s my pleasure to announce the release of the Qt 5.5 Beta today.

Since we released Qt 5.4, a lot of effort has been put into fixing bugs reported both by our customers and the community. With this in focus, we went through a couple weeks of dedicated bug fixing here at The Qt Company. During this time, we worked 100% on fixing as many open issues as possible. Although the focus of Qt 5.5 has been on stability and performance, it also has some interesting new features and functionality to offer.

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Android Leftovers

7 tools for analyzing performance in Linux with bcc/BPF

A new technology has arrived in Linux that can provide sysadmins and developers with a large number of new tools and dashboards for performance analysis and troubleshooting. It's called the enhanced Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF, or just BPF), although these enhancements weren't developed in Berkeley, they operate on much more than just packets, and they do much more than just filtering. I'll discuss one way to use BPF on the Fedora and Red Hat family of Linux distributions, demonstrating on Fedora 26. BPF can run user-defined sandboxed programs in the kernel to add new custom capabilities instantly. It's like adding superpowers to Linux, on demand. Examples of what you can use it for include: Read more