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KDE

digiKam Software Collection 4.4.0 released...

Filed under
KDE
Software

After a second long bugs triage since 4.3.0 release, we have worked hard to close another sets of reported issues.. See the new list of the issues closed in digiKam 4.4.0 available through the KDE Bugtracking System.

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Also: Weta Uses Kubuntu for Hobbit

KDE’s Plasma used in Hobbit movies [Video]

Filed under
KDE

KDE Software continues to be the best of the breed Open Source projects which stays ahead of its time – thus the science fictional name ‘Plasma’ for its desktop environment. KDE’s Plasma desktop remains the most popular, community driven projects.

As we reported earlier that KDE Software is being used beyond enthusiasts, it’s used by Hollywood to create blockbusters, logic defying, films like Gravity. Now we have spotted KDE’s Plasma desktop in the post production of Peter Jackson’s Hobbit films.

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Cutelyst 0.4.0 is out!

Filed under
Development
KDE

This is yet another big step for Cutelyst, this release bring several important fixes to the last version, and stabilizes the API a bit more. So far I have successfully deployed 3 commercial applications build on top of Cutelyst + Grantlee5, and the result is great.

If you don’t know Cutelyst yet it’s a Web Framework allowing you to build web applications using Qt, for more info check (this blog and) our website/wiki which is still work in progress: http://cutelyst.org or join #cutelyst on freenode

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Third Release of KDE Frameworks Brings a Multitude of Fixes

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KDE

Releases of KDE Frameworks are now a monthly feature. The release of KDE Frameworks 5.3 brings many small, but important fixes including:

KWindowSystem has added features needed for future versions of KWin,
KTextEditor used in Kate fixes memory leaks,
Frameworkintegration was fixed for Qt 5.4, and
KActivities can load plugins at runtime.

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My very first commit to KDE

Filed under
Development
KDE

After helping with a recent local KDE translation sprint, Andrej Mernik suggested that I should ask for direct commit access to the KDE localisations SVN, so I do not bug him or Andrej Vernekar to commit translations for me.

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Maui using KDE Frameworks 5

Filed under
KDE

In the past months cooperation has increased between Maui, KDE and LXDE developers, not only regarding libraries, but also key components such as SDDM (which has become the new standard for Qt based login managers) or Calamares, a new unified installer framework based on Qt.

In the meantime, KDE also released their long awaited effort named KDE Frameworks 5.
Frameworks 5 is a comprehensive set of technologies for the Qt ecosystem.

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Cantor: new features in KDE 4.14

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KDE

KDE 4.14 was released in August 2014 but I did not have time to write about new features in Cantor for that release.

So, let’s fix it now!

New backend: Lua

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Chakra-2014.09-Euler released

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

The Chakra team is happy to announce the first release of the Chakra Euler series, which will follow the 4.14 KDE releases.

A noticeable change in this release is the major face-lift of Kapudan, which now gives the option to users to enable the [extra] repository during first boot so they can easily install the most popular GTK-based applications. Kudos to george2 for the development and Malcer for the artwork.

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KDE Ships Beta for Plasma 5's Second Release

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KDE

September 30, 2014. Today KDE releases the beta for the second release of Plasma 5. Plasma 5 was released three months ago with many feature refinements and streamlining the existing codebase of KDE's popular desktop for developers to work on for the years to come.
This release is for testers to find bugs before our second release of Plasma 5.

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Kubuntu 14.10 Beta 2 Is Out, Features KDE 4.14 and Plasma 5 Preview – Screenshot Tour

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

The Kubuntu devs are a little late to the party, but they have finally published the details for the latest and final release in this development cycle. The 14.10 Beta 2 release is not very different from the previous one, with the exception of the implementation of KDE 4.14, which reached a stable stage in the meantime.

Users will also be able to take advantage of a new Kubuntu release to get familiar with the latest Plasma 5 desktop that can be tested right now. It's still far from a stable version, but the overall design won't change much more than this.

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Android Leftovers

Google's Upspin Debuts

  • Another option for file sharing
    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.
  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files
    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.
  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub
    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share. Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.
  • Google devs try to create new global namespace
    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like? The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

RPi-friendly home automation kit adds voice recognition support

Following its successful Kickstarter campaign for a standalone Matrix home automation and surveillance hub, and subsequent release of an FPGA-driven Matrix Creator daughter board for use with the Raspberry Pi, Matrix Labs today launched a “Matrix Voice” board on Indiegogo. The baseline board, currently available at early-bird pricing of $45, has an array of 7 microphones surrounding a ring of 18 software-controlled RGBW LEDs. A slightly pricier model includes an MCU-controlled WiFi/Bluetooth ESP32 wireless module. Read more

The Year Of Linux On Everything But The Desktop

The War on Linux goes back to Bill Gates, then CEO of Microsoft, in an “open letter to hobbyists” published in a newsletter in 1976. Even though Linux wouldn’t be born until 1991, Gates’ burgeoning software company – itself years away from releasing its first operating system – already felt the threat of open source software. We know Gates today as a kindly billionaire who’s joining us in the fight against everything from disease to income inequality, but there was a time when Gates was the bad guy of the computing world. Microsoft released its Windows operating system in 1985. At the time, its main competition was Apple and Unix-like systems. BSD was the dominant open source Unix clone then – it marks its 40th birthday this year, in fact – and Microsoft fired barrages of legal challenges to BSD just like it eventually would against Linux. Meanwhile Apple sued Microsoft over its interface, in the infamous “Look and Feel” lawsuit, and Microsoft’s reign would forever be challenged. Eventually Microsoft would be tried in both the US and the UK for antitrust, which is a government regulation against corporate monopolies. Even though it lost both suits, Microsoft simply paid the fine out of its bottomless pockets and kept right at it. Read more