Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

KDE Neon offers the latest and greatest KDE software on a stable Ubuntu base

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

After a lengthy public spat with Canonical and the Ubuntu Community Council, Kubuntu founder Jonathan Riddell stepped down as release manager for that "flavor" of Ubuntu. He’s now back with a new project named KDE Neon, which provides stable Ubuntu systems with the latest KDE software.

Read more

Luca Toma KDE Interview

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

Google Code In is our annual project to give tasks to school pupils to contribute to KDE projects. One task this year is to write a Dot article and top Code In student Stanford L has interviewed WikiToLearn contributor and Sysadmin Luca Toma.

Read more

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE

KDevelop 5.0 Beta 2 and 4.7.3 Releases!

Filed under
KDE

Hey all!

I have the pleasure to announce the releases of two new KDevelop versions:

On one hand, there is the new and shiny KDevelop 5.0 Beta 2 release, which brings us much closer to a final release. Tons of issues have been resolved, many features got polished, and even our UI cleaned up a bit here and there. And did I mention impoved OS X and Windows support? See here for more:

https://www.kdevelop.org/news/kdevelop-50-beta2-release

Besides this new beta release, which is where most of our effort went into, I am also happy to announce KDevelop 4.7.3, a new bugfix release of our latest stable KDE 4 based KDevelop. Several annoying problems are resolved now, see the announcement for more information:

https://www.kdevelop.org/news/kdevelop-473-release

Many thanks to everyone involved!

Cheers

Read more

GNOME and KDE

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • digiKam 5.0.0-beta3 is released

    digiKam team is proud to announce the release of digiKam Software Collection 5.0.0 beta3. This version is new stage to the long way to stabilize code of Qt5 port of next main digiKam release. See previous announcement about 5.0.0-beta2 release to know all details about code re-writing under progress.

  • GNOME Developer Experience hackfest: xdg-app + Debian

    Over the last few days I've been at the GNOME Developer Experience hackfest in Brussels, looking into xdg-app and how best to use it in Debian and Debian derivatives.

  • We are getting there...

    In the last two weeks, I worked on adding minimaps, enabling the different layouts for long routes and shorter routes and the refactoring of code. After discussion with design team, it was confirmed that minimaps were to be added for starting and finishing points only.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE neon Website Now Live
  • Kolab + CloudSuite: It's collaborative all the way down

    More FOSDEM news: Kolab Systems's CEO, Georg Greve and Collabora's General Manage, Michael Meeks, will be signing an agreement during the event to integrate CloudSuite into Kolab.

  • digiKam Explained: Chroma Subsampling

    But what is chroma subsampling and what does it do? As you may know, JPEG is a lossy format, which means that it trades quality for a smaller size. One of the methods for achieving a smaller size is to store color information (chroma) at a lower resolution than brightness (a.k.a intensity or luma) data. This is possible due to the fact that the human eye is less sensitive to color than brightness, so discarding color information doesn’t produce a perceptible loss of quality.

  • Dolphin Tip - Investigate Disk Usage

Neon launch (KDE)

Filed under
KDE
  • FOSDEM: Announcing KDE neon

    At FOSDEM this weekend KDE is announcing our newest project, KDE neon. Neon will provide a way to get the latest KDE software on the day its released.

    More than ever people expect a stable desktop with cutting-edge features, all in a package which is easy to use and ready to make their own.

  • Introducing KDE neon

    The latest and greatest of KDE community software packaged on a rock-solid base.

  • KDE Neon Is Now Live: Providing Bleeding-Edge KDE Packages For Ubuntu

    Following the news yesterday that KDE is incubating a new "KDE Neon" project, it's now been launched from FOSDEM this weekend in Brussels, Belgium.

    Sadly, it's no extraordinary breakthrough nor at this point does it seem to be fundamentally different from the former Project Neon. KDE Neon is about providing daily KDE packages to Ubuntu users.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDEPIM/KMail is NOT dead

    I answered that KMail and KDEPIM are still alive and they still continue to be maintain[ed].

  • Krita AppImages
  • So, here were are: Br-Print3D at Campus Party Brasil 9

    Today I made my first talk in a big event, I talked about Qt and C++, and on this talk a 100 people show up, but only 6 people on that group knew about Qt. I remembered when I started to study Qt, and it’s really hard to find Qt programmers on Brazil, until I met the people from KDE Brazil. So my talk was about how to create user interfaces with Qt. What modules we should use to make an app. If is better use QtWidgets or QtQuick. And I think that I made a impression. =D

  • High-DPI Support in Qt 5.6

    Qt 5.6 brings improved high-DPI support, in the form of better support for the devicePixelRatio scaling mode. In this blog we’ll look at how to configure and enable it, from the perspective of a Qt application user and a Qt application developer.

  • Kolab at FOSDEM 2016
  • Kolab: Bringing All Of Us Together, Part 2
  • Kate on Windows

    There are still some things that needs fixing. The current installer is built from git master and not from released packages so the translation stuff hat you usually get with the release packages are missing. So only partially translated. Another feature that I’m still missing is the spell-check. I need to still add a/hspell and language dictionaries to get that to work.

  • Snorenotify 0.7.0

    A few month ago I reported that Snorenotify is becoming a KDE project.

  • SCALE14x fun - openSUSE, KDE
  • How I’ve done these emoticons
  • Qt 5.7 Feature Freeze Planned For Next Week

    The Qt 5.7 release is running slightly behind schedule due to the recent licensing changes with open-sourcing some new components and other reasons, but upstream Qt developers are now planning for the feature freeze to happen next week.

  • KDE neon Launches at FOSDEM this Weekend
  • New "KDE Neon" Project Launching This Weekend

    Jonathan Riddell, the former Kubuntu release manager that was ousted from the project, will be announcing a "KDE Neon" incubator project this weekend at FOSDEM.

    Riddell posted a quick blog post on his personal site about there being a KDE Neon launch party on Saturday night in Brussels followed by a talk on Sunday about the new project.

KDE, GNOME, and Proprietary Software

Filed under
KDE
Software
GNOME
  • Plasma 5.5.3 & KDE Frameworks 5.18 Backported To Kubuntu 15.10
  • KDEPIM KDE and opensource

    As you know I decided to fix and improve Akregator for the next release (16.04 in april).

    So this week I continued to improve QtWebKit support.

  • Instrumenting the GLib main loop with Dunfell

    This screenshot is of a trace of the buffered-input-stream test from GIO, showing I/O callbacks being made across threads as idle source callbacks.

  • Project Templates

    Now that Builder has integrated Template-GLib, I started working on creating projects from templates. Today, this is only supported from the command line. Obviously the goal is to have it in the UI side-by-side with other project creation methods.

  • Big Switch Unveils Free Version of Its SDN Software

    The new Community Edition of Big Monitoring Fabric and Big Cloud Fabric is aimed at accelerating the adoption of Big Switch's SDN offerings.

    Big Switch Networks officials are looking to accelerate the adoption of the company's software-defined network products by offering free versions of its software products.

    The company on Jan. 26 introduced the Community Edition of its Big Monitoring Fabric and Big Cloud Fabric software offerings that officials said will give businesses a taste of what Big Switch's products can do and hopefully enticement them to buy the more robust commercial versions.

  • Opera 36.0 Gets New Build, Brings Personalized News and a Simplified Opera Menu

    Opera Software, through Aneta Reluga, today announced the release of yet another developer build for the upcoming Opera 36.0 web browser for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, Microsoft Windows, and Mac OS X.

  • Latest Vivaldi Web Browser Snapshot Adds New Appearance Settings, Bugfixes

    The Vivaldi development team, through Atle Mo, has been happy to announce the release and immediate availability for download of yet another snapshot build for the upcoming Vivaldi 1.0 web browser.

Tumbleweed delivers several KDE updates

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

Last week’s updates to Tumbleweed brought several new packages to openSUSE’s rolling release like Kmail 5, KDE Framework 5.18.0 and updates to Perl and YaST.

This week’s snapshot has KDE Applications 15.12.1, which contains only bugfixes and translation updates, and the virtual globe and world atlas Marble updated to from 15.08.3 to the 15.12.1 version.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills

  • Jobs Report: Rapid Growth in Demand for Open-Source Tech Talent
    The need for open-source technology skills are on the rise and companies and organizations continue to increase their recruitment of open-source technology talent, while offering additional training and certification opportunities for existing staff in order to fill skills gaps, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report, released today by The Linux Foundation and Dice. 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open-source talent, and nearly half (48%) report their organizations have begun to support open-source projects with code or other resources for the explicit reason of recruiting individuals with those software skills. After a hiatus, Linux skills are back on top as the most sought after skill with 80% of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise. 55% of employers are now also offering to pay for employee certifications, up from 47% in 2017 and only 34% in 2016.
  • Market value of open source skills on the up
    The demand for open source technology skills is soaring, however, 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open source talent, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report which was released this week.
  • SD Times news digest: Linux Foundation releases open-source jobs report, Android Studio 3.2 beta and Rust 1.27
    The Linux Foundation in collaboration with Dice.com has revealed the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report. The report is designed to examine trends in open-source careers as well as find out which skills are the most in demand. Key findings included 83 percent of hiring managers believes hiring open source talent is a priority and Linux is the most in-demand open-source skill. In addition, 57 percent of hiring managers are looking for people with container skills and many organizations are starting to get more involved in open-source in order to attract developers.

GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud
    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform. And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.
  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source
    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more