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KDE

Krita Desktop: A free, open source painting tool, maybe as good as Photoshop

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GNU
KDE
Linux
Software

From the One-to-watch Department: If you do any graphics work you should take a look at Krita Desktop, a really impressive painting tool that rivals Adobe Photoshop for features and makes some ways of working much easier.

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Skrooge 1.10.0 released

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KDE

The Skrooge Team announces the release 1.10.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks.

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Filing bug reports for fun and profit

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KDE

Since jumping to an testing install of Plasma 5 in my upgraded Kubuntu, I've been filing bugs as I find things not working. It took me a few days to notice that redshift no longer worked, because I didn't always use it. But when I had my eyes dilated for my annual eye exam, I needed it! And it crashed.

I love filing bugs using ubuntu-bug from the commandline. I would love to see KDE build this capability as well, because the little application gathers useful information automatically, and uploads it to the bug tracker. Man ubuntu-bug says it reports problems to your distribution's bug tracking system, using Apport to collect a lot of local information about your system to help the developers to fix the problem and avoid unnecessary question/answer turnarounds. Dr. Konqui does this sometimes, but a little cli app would be nice as well.

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Window and Desktop Switcher moved to Look’n’Feel Package

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KDE

Today we did an important change in how KWin will distribute its assets in the upcoming 5.2 release. When we started our thoughts about the Look’n’Feel Package and how we want to have meta themes for the complete Plasma workspace we also wanted to have this for the Window and Desktop switcher provided by KWin. So the structure of the Look’n’Feel Package already has all the pieces for including the Window and Desktop Switcher, but it was not used. Now we finally addressed this for the 5.2 release and moved the default switcher into the Look’n’Feel Package and KWin can locate the switchers from the Look’n’Feel Package.

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Kubuntu Vivid in Bright Blue

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KDE

The exiting news is that following some discussion and some wavering we will be switching to Plasma 5 by default. It has shown itself as a solid and reliable platform and it's time to show it off to the world.

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Accessibility is alive (QtSpeech progress, Jovie's deprecation)

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KDE

For some time I've been considering what to do about Jovie which was previously known as ktts (KDE Text To Speech). Since before the first KDE Frameworks release actually, since kdelibs used to host a dbus interface definition for the KSpeech dbus interface that ktts and then Jovie implemented. I have a qt5 frameworks branch of Jovie, but it didn't make much sense to port it, since a lot of it is or could become part of the upcoming QtSpeech module. So Jovie has no official qt5 port and wont be getting one either.

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WINDOW DECORATION THEMES IN KDECORATION2

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KDE

Most of the window decorations available for KWin are not native decorations but themes for a native theme engine, such as deKorator, Smaragd, QtCurve or my own Aurorae. Themes are much easier to design and to distribute than a native decoration which has to be implemented in C++ and be distributed by the Linux distribution. Thus themes are an important part of the decoration system.

But we did a very bad job of integrating the themes into our configuration system. The configuration system only knows about native decorations and doesn’t know that the native decoration is in fact a theme engine. This makes selecting a theme difficult, because a user has to first select the theme engine and then configure this to select the theme. Downloading new themes through GHNS is also difficult as again it requires to go through the configuration of the theme engine. We can do better.

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Porting KDE Telepathy to Qt 5 and Plasma 5

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KDE

I started working on that port back in the last KDE Telepathy sprint in Barcelona last April. Back then, I started to work on it because I have been doing heavy usage of the KTp plasmoids back when using the KDE 4 Plasma series and I didn’t want to live without them. Back then, I only ported the minimum parts of ktp-common-internals so it would work with KF5, as well as the plasmoids. It was quite some work, but definitely worth it since I’ve been using them ever since, and it’s worked wonderfully.

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Shared Values ⇒ Shared Ideas? What we can Learn from Firefox Australis

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KDE
Moz/FF

So, for all who feared that somehow KDE now decided to be “like Apple” or “like GNOME”, which translates for them to “Not giving the user any options”, fear not: In those cases where it makes sense, a flexible UI is precisely the embodiment of “Simple by default. Powerful when needed.”

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Season of KDE 2014

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KDE

Season of KDE is a community outreach program, much like Google Summer of Code that has been hosted by the KDE community for six years straight.

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Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.

GNU/Linux Games and Wine