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KDE

KDE's Plasma Phone UI Runs on Top of Wayland, Ubuntu Touch, and Kubuntu - Video

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KDE

It was recently brought to our attention that the KDE developers are hard at work these days preparing a new user interface (UI) for mobile devices running on top of the Ubuntu Touch and Kubuntu operating system, as well as on the next-generation Wayland display server.

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KDE Arrives in A Coruña for Akademy

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KDE

KDE is de-camping to the far west of Europe today to A Coruña in Galicia. In this north west corner of the Iberian Peninsula the sun is warm and the air is fresh. KDE contributors of all varieties will be spending a week in talks, discussions, hacking, renewing old friendships and getting to know people new to our KDE Community.

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Passwords and Settings for Ark

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KDE

I’m glad to announce that a couple of new, long-awaited (5 and 7 years respectively!) features are going to land in Ark. Starting from the 15.08 release (which will be KF5-based), Ark will be able to:

Create password-protected archives from scratch
Show a standard Settings dialog

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What do you think of Mageia 5 KDE?

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KDE
MDV

The last time I ran Mageia was in 2013. I wrote two articles about Mageia 3 and its predecessor Mageia 2 in these very pages. I had written several articles about Mandriva for years before eventually moving on to openSUSE, Fedora and Debian so I'm not unfamiliar with Mageia's roots.

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KDAB contributions to Qt 5.5

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KDE

The release process of Qt 5.5 has been focused on stabilizing and improving performances. Once more KDAB is proud to be a part of the release, with its engineers constantly providing contributions and patches, as demonstrated by the commit graph of the last 16 weeks.

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Setting Up Shop With KDE’s Plasma

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KDE

We’ve all seen those “screenshot tours” of FOSS desktops, but how about a real, guided tour of the Plasma (KDE) desktop? There are still a great many people who simply are not familiar with Plasma’s features. A large number of people never had any computer training, and when they find themselves in such an advanced environment, they feel completely lost. Many people can barely find their way around a single desktop; the concept of multiple virtual desktops is completely lost on them — never mind Plasma’s activities. So let’s take a little time and make some very basic changes to our desktop theme, and then organize our work. After all, that’s what activities are all about.

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Also: VDG + Akademy = Mmmm

Leftovers: KDE/Qt/Plasma

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KDE
  • New artwork coming in 5.4 & the tale of a troublesome wallpaper

    The new wallpaper and icons will be available in 5.4. I’d also like to thank the VDG, everyone is doing great stuff. Additionally, if you are attending Akademy I recommend to the utmost that you attend the various VDG events; we’re interested in roping developers to help out, and any coders will be appreciated. Great UI/UX is more than pretty pictures, and we’d love for developers to contribute so we make the entire package together!

  • KDE Plasma 5.4 Getting New Wallpaper, Some New Icons
  • Playback and export

    In order to deliver smooth playback, we cannot simply render the frames on the fly - that would be far too slow, especially once the number of layers starts to build up. Instead, we prerender the animation frames into a cache before playback.

  • GSoC ’15 Post #4: Porting to KF5

    The biggest issue here is porting – the KDE Network Filesharing repository is currently not on KF5, which would make it impossible to work with PackageKit-Qt5, which is currently being used all across. So, a newbie porter, I’ve been working with Jonathan to port things properly and fix as many bugs as I encounter while doing so.

Leftovers: KDE/Qt

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KDE

Fiber: Yet Another Web Browser For Qt/KDE

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KDE
Web

Ken was even experimenting with ways for Fiber to potentially remove the address bar from his browser, but those experiments haven't panned out and instead will be complemented by many browser extensions. The design of Fiber are many extensions: everything down to basic navigational elements and bookmark handling will be through extensions.

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Leftovers: KDE/Qt

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KDE
  • How to make your Qt application icon appear on Wayland task managers
  • QtAccountsService 0.6.0

    QtAccountsService is a Qt-style API for the AccountsService D-Bus service available for both C++ and QML.

  • LaKademy 2015 – my own Cantor sprint and other tasks

    My main work at LaKademy 2015 was to finish the port of Cantor to Qt5/KF5. I started this work in previous LaKademy, and now it was the time to end it. During the event I was engaged to drop KDELibs4Support from that software. I opened 5 review requests during the sprint, one for each library dropped. Now I am just finishing the plugin loading mechanism and the work will be completed.

  • "... if nothing changes"

    I try to keep memory of how various aspects of development were for me in past years. I do this by keeping specific projects I've been involved with fresh in my memory, revisiting them every so often and reflecting on how my methods and experiences have changed in the time since. This allows me to wander backwards 5, 10, 15, 20 years in the past and reflect.

    Today I was presenting the "final" code-level design for a project I've been tasked with: an IMAP payload filter for use with Kolab. The best way I can think to describe it is as a protocol-level firewall (of sorts) for IMAP. The first concrete use case we have for it is to allow non-Kolab-aware clients (e.g. Thunderbird) to connect to a Kolab server and see only the mail folders, implying that the groupware folders are filtered out of the IMAP session. There are a large number of other use case ideas floating about, however, and we wanted to make sure that we could accommodate those in future by extending the codebase. While drawing out on the whiteboard how I planned for this to come together, along with a break-out of the work into two-week sprints, I commented in passing that it was actually a nicely simple program.

  • 3 weeks till Plasma 5.4 Freeze

    If you have any new modules that need merging, new features, text changes or new artwork we need everything merged before the 6th of August.

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More in Tux Machines

Command Line: FFmpeg, Coinmon, Tizonia

  • FFmpeg Lands OpenCL Improvements
    Besides a lot of NVDEC code landing for the next FFmpeg release, there's also been a number of OpenCL improvements that were just committed to this multimedia library's codebase. The work landed yesterday includes removing an older and experimental OpenCL API while introducing a new OpenCL "hwcontext" implementation. This in turn has introduced an OpenCL overlay filter and OpenCL unsharp mask filter.
  • Coinmon – Check Cryptocurrency Prices From Commandline
    A while ago, we published a guide about Cli-Fyi – a potentially useful command line query tool. Using Cli-Fyi, we can easily find out the latest price of a cryptocurrency and lots of other useful details. Today, we are going to see yet another cryptcurrency price checker tool called “Coinmon”. Unlike Cli.Fyi, Coinmon is only for checking the price of various cryptocurrencies. Nothing more! Coinmon will check cryptocurrencies’ prices, changes right from your Terminal. It will fetch all details from from coinmarketcap.com APIs. It is quite useful for those who are both Crypto investors and Engineers.
  • Command Line Music Player for Spotify, YouTube & Other Music Streaming Services
    Tizonia is a command-line music player that let you stream music from Spotify, Google Play Music, YouTube, Soundcloud, and more, straight from the terminal.

OSS: Configuration Management, Man(ual), Patent Traps (5G and the Internet of Things), Sponsored Development

  • 9 Excellent Open Source Configuration Management Applications
    End users at public and private sector organizations sometimes perceive IT teams a barrier to the development of the business. When the business demands new services and applications, it may take months before progress is made. Why is that? It’s too common for IT teams to spend too much time fighting fires; after all they can come from so many different sources. An IT team’s main responsibility is to maintain, secure, and operate an organization’s systems and networks. This, in itself, carries a huge responsibility. IT teams that maintain technology infrastructure, deploy applications, and provisioning environments with many manual tasks are inefficient. In modern environments, services are rarely deployed in isolation. Simple applications may need several services to run – such as a web server and a database. Deploying more complex systems, many services may need installing, configuring, and linked together. Streamlining system administration must therefore be part of an IT solution. And one of the most time-consuming activity for IT teams is the management of the business’s infrastructure. Automation minimizes manual work, reducing the risk of human mistakes, and offering the ability to quickly deploy new services and applications without risking reliability. Whether it involves container orchestration, real-time big data, deep learning, or stream processing, large software demands operations to be automated. Here’s where configuration management system software steps in. This software automates the configuration of machines to a particular state. Like any other tools, they are designed to solve specific problems in certain ways. The goal is to get a system from whatever state it is in, into the desired state. Configuration management software are the tools of choice for many system administrators and devops professionals. Cloud platforms enable teams to deploy and maintain applications serving thousands of users, and the leading open source configuration management tools offer ways to automate the various processes.
  • 'Gimme Gimme Gimme' Easter egg in man breaks automated tests at 00:30
    The maintainer of the Linux manual program man has scrapped an "Easter egg" after it broke a user's automatic code tests. On Tuesday, Unix systems administrator Jeff Schaller wrote in a Stack Exchange post: "We've noticed that some of our automatic tests fail when they run at 00:30 but work fine the rest of the day. They fail with the message 'gimme gimme gimme' in stderr, which wasn't expected."
  • Open source and standards – The path towards 5G and the Internet of Things
    Following the success of last year’s event, the 2nd workshop “Open Source and Standards – The Path Towards 5G and the Internet of Things”, jointly organised by NGMN and the ITU, took place on 1st November 2017 in Bellevue (Seattle), Washington, USA. The workshop was hosted by Microsoft and co-organised by the IPR Plenary of the NGMN Alliance and the International Telecommunication Union. Bringing together key representatives of a wide range of industry, including standards bodies, open source communities and academia, the discussions focused on how best standard-setting organisations and open source communities can capitalise upon each other’s deliverables and expertise for building a consistent and coherent 5G eco-system. With more than 100 participants, the workshop discussed how diverse stakeholders can rely on the respective strengths and development models to place a broad range of industries in a strong position to achieve the common vision for 5G and beyond.
  • Sponsored development is a win-win for users and developers
    There is a myth that simply by making a software platform open source, qualified people will give up their nights and weekends to contribute to its development. With rare exceptions, that's not how the open source world works. Building a community of contributors takes time, and complex applications often have a steep learning curve before a developer becomes comfortable working with the code. Open source software companies are the fuel behind a lot of software development, forming the communities and providing the financial backing that support it. And, like any other type of business, open source software companies need to earn money to stay in business.

Games: GameShell, GOG, Oxygen Not Included and More

Linux 4.15 Will Treat The HTC Vive VR Headset As "Non-Desktop"

Currently if plugging in the HTC Vive for a virtual reality experience on Linux, the head-mounted display (HMD) is treated just as a conventional display. But now with a new set of changes for Linux 4.15, the kernel will know it's a "non-desktop" display. Besides the DRM leasing support that has already landed during the Linux 4.15 merge window with the main DRM pull request, David Airlie has sent in another pull today for further benefiting SteamVR with Linux 4.15. (And among other benefits, also the AMDGPU priority scheduling landed too for 4.15 as another benefit for VR Linux gaming when using AMD graphics.) Read more