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KDE

Pisi Linux 1.1 KDE

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Pisi Linux has continued its activities after 1.0 and we reached our second stable version 1.1. This version resulting from intensive studies; strong, stable, comfortable to use, safe and so fast. The strength of the structure to prevent damage to your system uses hardware safely to the end. Also in this release, along with many innovations were offered to us.

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Display Managers In Plasma 5

Filed under
KDE

KDM was dropped from Plasma 5. KDM includes code from XDM dating back to 1988! It had served it's job well. However, we're now at a point where we need the backend to be Wayland ready and we want to use more modern QML in the front end. When you have to replace both the back and front ends, it's a sign to just start from scratch.

There was some work done 2 years ago into sharing code with LightDM. In the meantime a separate project was started, SDDM which is (yet another) display manager.

Although personally I was very happy with what we had with LightDM it definitely doesn't make sense to split resources, so we focussed everything on SDDM and I have been helping work on that transferring knowledge from my old project.

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DWD – an FAQ for questions around the Web

Filed under
KDE

DWDs are not CSDs, and all theming and drawing is handled by the window manager and decoration. In addition, applications only export the structure of their widgets, they do not pre-draw or draw the widgets themselves. Applications would have little or no say in how their decorations look, just like traditional SSDs.

That being said, we don’t want DWDs to be absolutly rigid, we are looking at ‘safe’ ways applications can do basic branding on themselves in a reasonable manner, which decorations could potentially integrate without excessive effort. The main thing we are looking at is allowing applications to offer a colour pallet which decorations could use to tweak their appearance, but DWD ultimately would put the power in your hands and options would also be provided to disable unwanted hints and effects for more consistency. A primary sentiment with DWDs is that the user would be completely in control of all aspects DWDs would provide.

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[Gwenview] Habemus Maintainer!

Filed under
KDE

14 years ago, I started creating an image viewer. Back then it felt like a good project to get started with graphical application development for my newly installed Linux system. Little did I know... In 14 years Gwenview went through one toolkit change (GTK+1.2 to Qt2/KDE2), got ported to Qt3/KDE3, moved from SourceForge CVS to KDE Extragear, got ported to Qt4/KDE4, became the default image viewer of KDE4 and finally got ported to Qt5/KF5.

[...]

You may be aware I spend most of my free time these days on some other project. I am not completely out of Qt and KDE development however: I have a number of small side projects, many of them Qt-based, to which I want to give a bit more visibility. Stay tuned for more announcements.

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Krita Desktop: A free, open source painting tool, maybe as good as Photoshop

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
Software

From the One-to-watch Department: If you do any graphics work you should take a look at Krita Desktop, a really impressive painting tool that rivals Adobe Photoshop for features and makes some ways of working much easier.

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Skrooge 1.10.0 released

Filed under
KDE

The Skrooge Team announces the release 1.10.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks.

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Filing bug reports for fun and profit

Filed under
KDE

Since jumping to an testing install of Plasma 5 in my upgraded Kubuntu, I've been filing bugs as I find things not working. It took me a few days to notice that redshift no longer worked, because I didn't always use it. But when I had my eyes dilated for my annual eye exam, I needed it! And it crashed.

I love filing bugs using ubuntu-bug from the commandline. I would love to see KDE build this capability as well, because the little application gathers useful information automatically, and uploads it to the bug tracker. Man ubuntu-bug says it reports problems to your distribution's bug tracking system, using Apport to collect a lot of local information about your system to help the developers to fix the problem and avoid unnecessary question/answer turnarounds. Dr. Konqui does this sometimes, but a little cli app would be nice as well.

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Window and Desktop Switcher moved to Look’n’Feel Package

Filed under
KDE

Today we did an important change in how KWin will distribute its assets in the upcoming 5.2 release. When we started our thoughts about the Look’n’Feel Package and how we want to have meta themes for the complete Plasma workspace we also wanted to have this for the Window and Desktop switcher provided by KWin. So the structure of the Look’n’Feel Package already has all the pieces for including the Window and Desktop Switcher, but it was not used. Now we finally addressed this for the 5.2 release and moved the default switcher into the Look’n’Feel Package and KWin can locate the switchers from the Look’n’Feel Package.

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Kubuntu Vivid in Bright Blue

Filed under
KDE

The exiting news is that following some discussion and some wavering we will be switching to Plasma 5 by default. It has shown itself as a solid and reliable platform and it's time to show it off to the world.

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Accessibility is alive (QtSpeech progress, Jovie's deprecation)

Filed under
KDE

For some time I've been considering what to do about Jovie which was previously known as ktts (KDE Text To Speech). Since before the first KDE Frameworks release actually, since kdelibs used to host a dbus interface definition for the KSpeech dbus interface that ktts and then Jovie implemented. I have a qt5 frameworks branch of Jovie, but it didn't make much sense to port it, since a lot of it is or could become part of the upcoming QtSpeech module. So Jovie has no official qt5 port and wont be getting one either.

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More in Tux Machines

Latvian Ventspils controls costs with open source

The administration of Ventspils, Latvia’s sixth largest city, is an avid user of free and open source software. The main benefits: cost and resource optimisation. Read more

Ubuntu Touch finds a home on a conflict-free, fair-trade, user-maintainable handset

Handset maker Fairphone is teaming up with the community project UBports, which seeks to get Ubuntu Touch on mobile devices. They will be showing off Ubuntu Touch running on the Fairphone 2 during Mobile World Congress, which starts February 27 in Barcelona. While Ubuntu is probably not the first name that comes to mind when you think of mobile devices, the phone in question offers some compelling features. “UBports Foundation will be showcasing its work at the Canonical booth, the company behind Ubuntu. Canonical is planning to tell about the latest developments around the convergence of its devices and UBports Foundation will share its mission ‘Ubuntu On Every Device’ with the visitors,” UBports said in a February 8 press release. Currently, UBports’ website lists three devices as “fully working as daily drivers:” The OnePlus One, Nexus 5, and the Fairphone 2, with the latter showing all parts as functioning with Ubuntu Touch, save the GPS radio. (Interestingly, the UBports project website for the Fairphone 2 still lists the GSM radio [in addition to the GPS] as a work in progress. However there is a video of two people talking with the handset, so it’s likely the Fairphone 2 project website is out of date.) The website also has instructions for flashing Ubuntu to the Fairphone 2. Read more

BSD Leftovers

  • LLVM/Clang 4.0 Is Running Late Due To Seven Blocker Bugs
    LLVM 4.0 was supposed to have been released by now, but it's running late due to open blocker bugs. Hans Wennborg commented on the mailing list that while the release should have happened on 21 February, serving as release manager, he hasn't tagged the release yet due to open blocker bugs.
  • FreeBSD-Based pfSense 2.3.3 Open-Source Firewall Released with over 100 Changes
    Rubicon Communications' Jim Pingle announced the availability of a new point release to the pfSense 2.3 stable series, which adds over 100 improvements and a bunch of new features. Updated to FreeBSD 10.3-RELEASE-p16, the pfSense 2.3.3 maintenance release is here more than seven months after the 2.3.2 update and introduces several new packages, including TFTP Server, LCDproc, cellular, and tinc, a lot of improvements for the OpenVPN and IPsec implementations, as well as numerous stability and security fixes from FreeBSD. Dozens of bug fixes are included in pfSense 2.3.3 for WebGUI, graphs and monitoring, gateways and routing, notifications, Dynamic DNS, captive portal, NTP and GPS, DNS, resolver and forwarder, DHCP and DHCPv6 servers, router advertisements, HA and CARP, traffic shaping, firewall, rules, NAT, aliases, states, users, authentication, and privileges.
  • “Hi, I’m jkh and I’m a d**k”
    Yesterday, I was privy to a private email message discussing a topic I care deeply about. I contacted the author and said “You really need to make this public and give this a wider audience.” His response boiled down to “if I wanted it to get a wider audience, I was welcome to do so myself.” So here’s my first ever guest post, from Jordan K Hubbard, one of the founders of the FreeBSD Project. While this discussion focuses on FreeBSD, it’s applicable to any large open source project.

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