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KDE

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.5.0

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KDE

This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

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GCompris Joins the KDE incubator and Launches a Fundraiser

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KDE

GCompris has joined the KDE incubator. GCompris is the high quality educational software suite comprising numerous activities for children aged 2 to 10, and well known by parents and teachers all over the world.

GCompris was started in 2000 by Bruno Coudoin as a Free Software project. Originally written in GTK+, the project developers decided in early 2014 to make a radical change and rewrite it in Qt Quick. The main motivation is the ability of the Qt platform to address the desktop and the tablet market from a single code base.

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Qt 5.4 released

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Development
KDE

I am happy to announce that Qt 5.4 has been released today and is available for download from qt.io. Together with Qt 5.4, we have also released Qt Creator 3.3 and an update to Qt for device creation on embedded Linux and embedded Android.

But let’s start with Qt 5.4. One of the main focus areas of this Qt release has been around Web technologies and we have a lot of cool new things to offer there.

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Best KDE distro of 2014

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KDE

The end is nigh. The end is upon us. We are, of course, talking about the end of the calendar year, and this means voting for the best of the best. In a few days, we will have the grand Dedoimedo best distro contest, but before we do that, let’s do a more specific vote. Namely, let’s elect the finest KDE distro of the current year.

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The Pillars of KDE “Now”

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KDE

KDE 4 had its pillars. As the community disintegrated they fell to the wayside.

The KDE community continues to produce excellent technology. In particular, Plasma 5 is shaping up very nicely (although it is still not quite “there” enough for me to use it as my main desktop yet). But, inevitably, the fractured nature of the community will reflect in the user experience and, at that point, one of our killer features (being “the integrated experience”) will be gone.

So I’m left wondering, what are the pillars of KDE now? What are the “things” we, as a community, can all get behind and say “these are the things that underpin the KDE experience”.

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Randa Meetings 2014 - Another Great Success

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KDE

It's been quite some time since the Randa Meetings 2014 and even this year's edition of the KDE Community Summit called Akademy has already happened, but it's still nice to look back and see what was accomplished at this KDE Tech Summit in the middle of the Swiss Alps.

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Looking at the memory improvements of KDecoration2

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KDE

This week I finally moved kdecoration2 to the kde/workspace project structure and merged in the required backend code in kwin. This means the upcoming 5.2 release will ship with the new Breeze window decoration by default.

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Help us for a New Unified Graphics for GCompris

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KDE

Currently the graphics are one of the weakest part of GCompris, as they were mostly done by the developers, using free graphics assets and sparse graphic artist contributions.

To address this problem, we found Timothée Giet, a talented graphic artist interested in working on a complete graphics redesign. He is a long standing Free-Software contributor, active member of the Krita team and so part of the KDE community. Making new graphics for more than 100 activities is a big work, so we need your help to achieve this goal.

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Calligra 2.8.7 Released

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KDE
Software

This supplementary release 2.8.7 marks the end of Calligra Suite, and Calligra Active 2.8 series. If you update to 2.8.7 (and you should), you’ll receive over 20 improvements, mostly in Kexi and Krita.

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Interview with Esfir Kanievska

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KDE
Humor

Open source, OMG ❤❤❤ Seriously, I like open source software much because there’s no need to bother my credit card every time the new software (as well as new OS) version is released. Moreover, the open source software developers are actually more interested in how to make it work rather than how to make it sell, so the result is often more human-oriented.

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Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.

GNU/Linux Games and Wine