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KDE

Kdenlive 18.08.2 released

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KDE

Kdenlive 18.08.2 is out bringing usability improvements and a crash fix. The Windows version is also becoming more stable with every release and this version brings fixes to the translation installation and the introduction of a crash report.

In other news, the Refactoring is moving steadily ahead and we will release a wider test beta version soon, stay tuned. Also the refactoring branch is now building automatically on KDE’s automated integration system (CI), and all the regressions tests pass. This means that after each change to the source code, the CI will run the tests to check that no regression happens. On the sysadmin front we are cleaning up our bug tracker in preparation for the 18.12 release.

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Krita 4.1.5 Released

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KDE

Coming hot on the heels of Krita 4.1.3, which had an unfortunate accident to the TIFF plugin, we’re releasing Krita 4.1.5 today! There’s a lot more than just that fix, though, since we’re currently celebrating the last week of the Krita Fundraiser by having a very productive development sprint in Deventer, the Netherlands.

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Qt Creator 4.8 Beta released

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KDE

In Qt Creator 4.8 we’ll introduce experimental support for the language server protocol. For many programming languages there is a “language server” available, which provides IDEs with a whole lot of information about the code, as long as they support communicating via the protocol.

This means that by providing a client for the language server protocol, Qt Creator gets (some) support for many programming languages “for free”. Currently Qt Creator supports code completion, highlighting of the symbol under cursor, and jumping to the symbol definition, as well as integrates diagnostics from the language server. Highlighting and indentation are still provided by our generic highlighter, since they are not provided via the language server protocol.

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Also: Qt Creator 4.8 Rolls Into Beta With C++ Improvements, Language Server Protocol Support

Plasma 5.14 Comes with New Features and a Much Polished Environment

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KDE

Tuesday, 9 October 2018. Today KDE launches the first release of Plasma 5.14.

Plasma is KDE's lightweight and full featured Linux desktop. For the last three months we have been adding features and fixing bugs and now invite you to install Plasma 5.14.

A lot of work has gone into improving Discover, Plasma's software manager, and, among other things, we have added a Firmware Update feature and many subtle user interface improvements to give it a smoother feel. We have also rewritten many effects in our window manager KWin and improved it for slicker animations in your work day. Other improvements we have made include a new Display Configuration widget which is useful when giving presentations.

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

KDE Plasma 5.14 Released With A Plethora Of Improvements

0.3 Release of Elisa Music Player

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KDE

Elisa is a music player developed by the KDE community that strives to be simple and nice to use. We also recognize that we need a flexible product to account for the different workflows and use-cases of our users.

We focus on a very good integration with the Plasma desktop of the KDE community without compromising the support for other platforms (other Linux desktop environments, Windows and Android).

We are creating a reliable product that is a joy to use and respects our users privacy. As such, we will prefer to support online services where users are in control of their data.

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KDE Plasma 5.15 Desktop Environment Will Start Faster, Bring More Improvements

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KDE

Now that work on the KDE Plasma 5.14 desktop environment, due for release tomorrow, October 9, 2018, is almost done, the development team is now concentrating their efforts on the next major release, KDE Plasma 5.15, by making various performance improvements and adding new features to the core apps and components.

According to Nate Graham's latest report, the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.15 desktop environment will start a little bit faster, with 100ms, compared to previous releases. Also, KRunner will no longer display duplicate bookmarks from Firefox and Folder View widgets and Konsole Profiles widget will work better with keyboard navigation.

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This week in Usability & Productivity, part 39

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KDE

Welcome to an especially humongous week in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative! I typically assemble these reports incrementally over the course of the week, as fixes trickle in. But this week, I had to spend almost 4 hours yesterday getting it ready after an enormous flood of incredible work on Friday and Saturday. And there was a time at around 6 PM when patches for Baloo started pouring in faster than my capacity to review them (expect more on Baloo next week). KDE Contributors were truly on a roll!

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LibreOffice Qt5 Integration, Qt-based Krita 4.2 is Coming and GNOME Games 3.30 Suffering "Features Overload"

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KDE
LibO
GNOME
  • LibreOffice Qt5 Integration Sees Further Improvements

    The past year LibreOffice has sported a Qt5 interface plug-in for better integration with Qt-based environments like a better "KDE 5" experience. In recent days has been more improvements to this Qt5 integration.

    Hitting the LibreOffice Git tree over the past week has been initial a11y support (accessibility) while landing today was the initial Qt5 clipboard support.

  • Looking forward to Krita 4.2!

    Everyone is hard at work, and what will become Krita 4.2 is taking shape already. Today we’re presenting a preview of Krita 4.2. It’s not complete yet, and there ARE bugs. More than in the stable release (we’ll be doing a 4.1.4 after all next week to clear up some more bugs…), and some might make you lose work.

  • Games 3.30: Features Overload

    With a new version of GNOME always comes a new version of Games, and this new version comes packed with new features, bug fixes and developer experience improvements.

Debian KDE for Fun Computing Part 1: Intro

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KDE
Debian

Hello, please introduce Debian Live KDE Edition. It is a free, beautiful desktop operating system with LiveCD capability, available in 50+ of world languages, with tens of thousands free software packages are available, and amazingly vast user community. This article is the first part of introducing fun living with Debian KDE as desktop computer operating system. Here, you will see basic things about Debian, Debian Live, and Debian KDE, including where to download and how to make a bootable installation media. I hope you will like Debian KDE and find it user friendly. Enjoy Debian KDE!

[...]

That's all for now. You got a basic knowledge about Debian KDE. The next part will talk about basic orientation of Debian KDE internals such as built-in applications, doing basic tasks, how to get new applications, and so on. See you next time. Have fun with Debian KDE!

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Here’s KDE Neon 5.13.5 : Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Uses KDE Plasma 5.13.5

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KDE
Reviews

KDE Neon 5.13.5 is the latest stable release of KDE neon 5 based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver and powered by Linux Kernel 4.15 series. Features KDE Plasma 5.13.5 desktop environment, which brings numerous enhancements and new features.

As default desktop KDE neon 5.13.5, latest KDE plasma 5.13 offering new features called browser integration, which Firefox/Chrome/Chromium users can install the corresponding plugin from their browser app store to ensure that any downloads appear as a notification on the desktop. The Media Controls Plasmoid (widget) also allows user to mute and skip videos when playing in the browser, although this isn’t especially convenient compared to accessing the video controls in the browser itself.

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today's leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • #RecruitmentFocus: Open source skills in high demand
    The unemployment rate in South Africa rose to 27.5% in the third quarter of 2018, while the demand for skills remains high - leaving an industry conundrum that is yet to be solved. According to SUSE, partnerships that focus on upskilling graduates and providing real-work skills, as well as placement opportunities - could be exactly what the industry in looking for.
  • Stable: not moving vs. not breaking
    There are two terms that brings a heavy controversy in the Open Source world: support and stable. Both of them have their roots in the “old days” of Open Source, where its commercial impact was low and very few companies made business with it. You probably have read a lot about maintenance vs support. This controversy is older. I first heard of it in the context of Linux based distributions. Commercial distribution had to put effort in differentiating among the two because in Open SOurce they were used indistictly but not in business. But this post is about the adjectivet stable…
  • Cameron Kaiser: A thank you to Ginn Chen, whom Larry Ellison screwed
    Periodically I refresh my machines by dusting them off and plugging them in and running them for a while to keep the disks spinnin' and the caps chargin'. Today was the day to refurbish my Sun Ultra-3, the only laptop Sun ever "made" (they actually rebadged the SPARCle and later the crotchburner 1.2GHz Tadpole Viper, which is the one I have). Since its last refresh the IDPROM had died, as they do when they run out of battery, resetting the MAC address to zeroes and erasing the license for the 802.11b which I never used anyway. But, after fixing the clock to prevent GNOME from puking on the abnormal date, it booted and I figured I'd update Firefox since it still had 38.4 on it. Ginn Chen, first at Sun and later at Oracle, regularly issued builds of Firefox which ran very nicely on SPARC Solaris 10. Near as I can determine, Oracle has never offered a build of any Firefox post-Rust even to the paying customers they're bleeding dry, but I figured I should be able to find the last ESR of 52 and install that. (Amusingly this relic can run a Firefox in some respects more current than TenFourFox, which is an evolved and patched Firefox 45.)
  • Protecting the world’s oceans with open data science
    For environmental scientists, researching a single ecosystem or organism can be a daunting task. The amount of data and literature to comb through (or create) is often overwhelming. So how, then, can environmental scientists approach studying the health of the world’s oceans? What ocean health means is a big question in itself—oceans span millions of square miles, are home to countless species, and border hundreds of countries and territories, each of which has its own unique marine policies and practices. But no matter how daunting this task may seem, it’s a necessary and vital one. So in 2012, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and Conservation International publicly launched the Ocean Health Index (OHI), an ambitious initiative to measure the benefits that oceans provide to people, including clean water, coastal protections, and biodiversity. The idea was to create an annual assessment to document major oceanic changes and trends, and in turn, use those findings to craft better marine policy around the world.

Openwashing Leftovers

The Last Independent Mobile OS

The year was 2010 and the future of mobile computing was looking bright. The iPhone was barely three years old, Google’s Android had yet to swallow the smartphone market whole, and half a dozen alternative mobile operating systems—many of which were devoutly open source—were preparing for launch. Eight years on, you probably haven’t even heard of most of these alternative mobile operating systems, much less use them. Today, Android and iOS dominate the global smartphone market and account for 99.9 percent of mobile operating systems. Even Microsoft and Blackberry, longtime players in the mobile space with massive revenue streams, have all but left the space. Then there’s Jolla, the small Finnish tech company behind Sailfish OS, which it bills as the “last independent alternative mobile operating system.” Jolla has had to walk itself back from the edge of destruction several times over the course of its seven year existence, and each time it has emerged battered, but more determined than ever to carve out a spot in the world for a truly independent, open source mobile operating system. After years of failed product launches, lackluster user growth, and supply chain fiascoes, it’s only been in the last few months that things finally seem to be turning to Jolla’s favor. Over the past two years the company has rode the wave of anti-Google sentiment outside the US and inked deals with large foreign companies that want to turn Sailfish into a household name. Despite the recent success, Jolla is far from being a major player in the mobile market. And yet it also still exists, which is more than can be said of every other would-be alternative mobile OS company. Read more