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KDE

First Beta Release of Krita 4.1

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KDE

Three months after the release of Krita 4.0, we’re releasing the first (and probably only) beta of Krita 4.1, a new feature release!

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KDE/Qt: Qt 6 in Sight and Elisa 0.2 Beta

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KDE
  • Qt Contributor Summit 2018

    About two weeks ago i attended Qt Contributor Summit 2018, i did so wearing my KDAB hat, but given that KDE software is based heavily on Qt I think I'll give a quick summary of the most important topic that was handled at the Summit: Qt 6

  • The Qt 6 Plans For November 2020, Qt 5.15 Likely Being Last Of Qt5

    At the recent Qt Contributors' Summit as previously covered on Phoronix were some early discussions over plans to release Qt 6.0 in 2020. A few more tidbits of information have come to light on these interesting tool-kit plans.

    Albert Astals Cid of KDAB was at this recent Qt conference and he has now shared his summit notes, particularly around Qt 6. He confirms that Qt 6.0 is planning for a November 2020 release, Qt 6 should be an easy migration path from Qt 5, etc.

  • 0.2 Beta 1 Release of Elisa Music Player

    Elisa is a music player developed by the KDE community that strives to be simple and nice to use. We also recognize that we need a flexible product to account for the different workflows and use-cases of our users.

    We focus on a very good integration with the Plasma desktop of the KDE community without compromising the support for other platforms (other Linux desktop environments, Windows and Android).

  • Elisa 0.2 Beta Released For This Newest KDE Music Player

    KDE's Elisa music player is just over one year old and with a few months having passed since the Elisa 0.1 inaugural release, succeeding that today is the beta for the upcoming Elisa 0.2.

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

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KDE
  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux

    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.

  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE

    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software.

    Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.

  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG

    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time.

    I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.

KDE and GNOME: File Picker, Flatpaks and Epiphany 3.29

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KDE
LibO
GNOME
  • LibreOffice Picks Up A Native "KDE 5" File Picker

    Several months back LibreOffice developers began working on better integration with KDE Plasma 5 and that has advanced again today with now having a native file picker.

  • Going In-Depth With Flatpak For Sandboxed Application Packaging

    Red Hat / GNOME developer veteran Matthias Clasen has recently begun a series of blog posts going in-depth with Flatpaks for those wondering how this application deployment technology is taking over the Linux desktop.

    Last week Clasen penned the initial piece for explaining bundles, runtimes, and extensions in the Flatpak realm.

  • Epiphany 3.29.3 Picks Up A Reader Mode, Finally Disables NPAPI Plugins

    Epiphany 3.29.3 is now available as the latest version of this GNOME Web Browser.

    Being in the middle of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle, the Epiphany 3.29.3 release is made up of many changes. First up, Epiphany now has an experimental reader mode that is inspired by Mozilla's Firefox reader mode. When viewing page sources in Epiphany, it will also now display within the web browser itself rather than the text editor.

KDE Plasma 5.13 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, over 20 Bugs Fixed

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KDE

The KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment launched a week ago as the best release of the acclaimed desktop designed for GNU/Linux distributions, introducing new lock and login screens, redesigned system settings, Plasma Browser Integration, Plasma Discover enhancements, and many other improvements and changes.

Now, users can update their KDE Plasma 5.13 installations to the first point release, KDE Plasma 5.13.1, which brings more than 20 bug fixes across various components, such as Plasma Discover, Plasma Add-ons, Plasma Desktop, Plasma Networkmanager (plasma-nm), KWin, and KDE Hotkeys.

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Qt 5.11.1 Released

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KDE

I am pleased to announce that Qt 5.11.1 is released today. As a patch release Qt 5.11.1 does not add any new functionality, but provides important bug fixes and other improvements.

New Qt 5.11.1 is first patch release for Qt 5.11 series. There are fixes for over 150 bugs and it contains more than 700 changes compared to Qt 5.11.0. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.11.1. And don’t worry if some fix is missing from new Qt5.11.1 release; we are planning to release Qt 5.11.2 at the beginning of September.

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Also: Qt 5.11.1 Released With 150+ Bug Fixes

Kubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver upgrades - Results!

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KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

A month later, two upgrades later, Kubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver is a nicer distribution than what I tested shortly after its official release. But then, it's not perfect. The older box with the Nvidia card returned better results overall, although there were some niggles. On the multi-boot laptop, I wasn't too happy with the slow-boot issue, although this is NOT a Kubuntu-specific problem, as you will learn in a few days. But it still does not give me the razor-sharp confidence I need and expect from an LTS.

In general, Ubuntu-family upgrades are reasonably robust, but they can still be more streamlined, including package removal, third-party repos and odd glitches here and there. I wonder how I'd have felt if I tested Beaver fresh, right now. Alas, I cannot delete the memory of my first encounter. With Trusty, it was just right. Here, it might be right, and I may even end up using - and loving - Plasma Bionic in my prod setup, but it will never be the amazing chemistry I had with 14.04.

But if you're wondering, by all means, worth testing and upgrading, and the post-release Kubuntu Beaver is a pretty slick and tight distro. If I had to judge in isolation, i.e. no early-May scars, then when I combine performance, looks, fonts, media, hardware support, and such, 'tis really neat. Something like 9/10. Now, just waiting for the Men In Black mind-zapping eraser thingie, so I can be blissfully happy. And we're done.

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KDE/Qt: Qt 3D, Kube/Kolab, GSoC, and Atelier (3-D Printing)

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KDE
  • What a mesh!

    With all the advances being made in Qt 3D, we wanted to create some new examples showing some of what it can do. To get us started, we decided to use an existing learning framework, so we followed the open source Tower Defence course, which you can find at CGCookie. Being a game, it allows an interactive view of everything at work, which is very useful.

  • Last week in Kube

    Perhaps if Windows wasn’t such a PITA there would be more progress

  • GSoC 2018: Week 4 & 5

    The last 2 weeks were mainly dedicatd for reviews and testing and thanks to my mentors, I passed the first evaluation with good work till now. Some significant changes were made on discussion with my mentors during the last 2 weeks in the code and some new features.

  • Giving Atelier some Love

    I work for atelier together with Chris, Lays and Patrick for quite a while, but I was basically being the “guardian angel” of the project being invocked when anything happened or when they did not know how to proceed (are you a guardian angel of a project? we have many that need that)

    For instance I’v done the skeleton for the plugin system, the buildsystem and some of the modules in the interface, but nothing major as I really lacked the time and also lacked a printer.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Landed

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KDE
SUSE

As of today, the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system is now powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.17 kernel series, which landed in the most recent snapshot released earlier.

Tumbleweed snapshot 20180615 was released today, June 17, 2018, and it comes only two days after snapshot 20180613, which added the Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack and KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, along with many components of the latest KDE Applications 18.04.2 software suite.

Today's snapshot 20180615 continued upgrading the KDE Applications software suite to version 18.04.2, but it also upgraded the kernel from Linux 4.16.12 to Linux 4.17.1. As such, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed is now officially powered by Linux kernel 4.17, so upgrading your installs as soon as possible would be a good idea.

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KDE: Usability and Productivity initiative, Kraft and Konsole

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KDE
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 23

    This has been a bit of a light week for KDE’s Usability and Productivity initiative, probably because everyone’s basking in the warm glow of a well-received release: KDE Plasma 5.13 came out on Tuesday and is getting great reviews!

  • Kraft Version 0.81 Released

    I am happy to announce the release of Kraft version 0.81. Kraft is a Qt based desktop application that helps you to handle documents like quotes and invoices in your small business.

    Version 0.81 is a bugfix release for the previous version 0.80, which was the first stable release based on Qt5 and KDE Frameworks5. Even though it came with way more new features than just the port, it’s first release has proven it’s stability in day-to-day business now for a few month.

  • Giving Konsole some love

    I started to hack in Konsole, and first I was afraid, I was petrified. You know, touching those hardcore apps that are the center of the KDE Software Collection.

    I started touching it mostly because some easy to fix bugs weren’t fixed, and as every cool user knows, this is free software. So I could pay for someone to fix my bugs, or I could download the source code and try to figure out what the hell was wrong with it. I choosed the second approach.

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Android Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • 8 hurdles IT must overcome if they want open source success
    Open source software has the potential to drive innovation and collaboration across an enterprise, and can transform the way developers work together. "Open source is now part of the evaluation criteria when deciding on a software platform, so much so that it is expected," said Matt Ingenthron, senior director of engineering at Couchbase. "In this way, open source has somewhat faded into the background in a positive way. Just like no consumer would inquire if a mobile phone had internet access or text messaging, choosing an open source solution is almost always an option."
  • Sprint calls on open source analytics to prevent cyberfraud
    Mobile phone-related fraud is big business. Fraudsters, hackers, and other bad actors employ creative techniques to compromise networks, hijack user information, and piece together customer identities that are then sold for big bucks on the dark web. To protect its customers, Sprint needed to transform the way it detected and blocked fraudulent activity. “In the mobile phone business, there’s no markup on selling devices — our bread and butter is the network and the services that are delivered on that network, through the devices,” says Scott Rice, CIO of Sprint. “Identity theft is a huge problem and the ability for nefarious actors to use that theft of information to impersonate our customers means we were eating the costs of the devices and the costs of services delivery.”
  • Open Source Platform Delivers LDAP Integration
    The latest release of InfluxData, an open source platform for metrics, events, and other time series data, adds LDAP integration, new advanced analytics, and self-healing capabilities in the time series database platform. According to the company, time series data, collected and stored with InfluxData’s Time Series database platform is integral to observability and is becoming mission critical for organizations. Enhancements to InfluxEnterprise make it easier for administrators to keep this mission critical data available and secure by checking and verifying every requested action. This includes creating databases, storing data and running queries – against a user’s stored authorizations and role.
  • YOYOW-WeCenter Special Edition Release: Free and Open Source
    The YOYOW-WeCenter Special Edition, customized and developed by YOYOW and based on WeCenter Q&A community framework, has been released on GitHub. Compared to regular WeCenter frameworks, YOYOW is providing free open source services and will be continually iterating products and will be introducing an incentive mechanism. Each Q&A community can directly integrate into YOYOW's bottom layer network and enjoy the network services provided by YOYOW.
  • Add-on Recommended By Mozilla Caught Logging Users’ Browsing History
    According to the reports by Mike Kuketz, an independent security blogger from Germany and uBlock Origin, an add-on named “Web Security” has been caught collecting users’ browsing history. [...] Soon after this discovery by Hill, Kuketz added a post on his blog about the same extension pointing to the same strange behavior of the add-on. A user on Kuketz’s blog decoded the garbled data and found that the add-on was collecting users’ browsing history and sending it to a German server.
  • Zombies: Top 5 Open Source Vulnerabilities That Refuse To Die [Ed: Microsoft partner WhiteSource continues to stigmatise FOSS as a security nightmare, using bugs branded by other Microsoft partner for extra panic]
  • How a civic hacker used open data to halve tickets at Chicago's most confusing parking spot
    Matt Chapman used the Freedom of Information Act to get the City of Chicago's very mess parking ticket data; after enormous and heroic data normalization, Chapman was able to pinpoint one of the city's most confusing parking spots, between 1100-1166 N State St, which cycled between duty as a taxi-stand and a parking spot with a confusingly placed and semi-busted parking meter. After surveying the site and deducing the problem, Chapman contacted the alderman responsible for that stretch of North State Street, and, eight months later, the signage was cleaned up and made more intuitive. Followup data analysis showed that Chapman's work had halved the number of parking tickets issued on the spot, with 600-odd fewer tickets in the past 20 months, for a savings of $60,000 to Chicago motorists.
  • Bluespec, Inc. Releases a New Family of Open-Source RISC-V Processors
    Bluespec Inc. has released Piccolo, its first in a family of RISC-V open-source processors provided as a vehicle for open innovation in embedded systems. Piccolo is a 3-stage RV32IM processor whose small “footprint” is ideal for many IoT applications. The repository (https://github.com/bluespec/Piccolo) contains a royalty-free synthesizable Verilog core that can be easily integrated and deployed into an ASIC or FPGA. Bluespec, Inc. will actively maintain Piccolo. It also offers commercial-grade tools for the customization and verification of RISC-V cores. Configurations will be continually added to provide the full spectrum of embedded controller features. Companies or universities interested in contributing to the Piccolo project should contact Bluespec, Inc. (add contact – RISC-V open source support).

KDE Applications 18.08 Open-Source Software Suite Released, Here's What's New

Being in development for the past several months, KDE Applications 18.08 goes stable today and will hit the software repositories of various popular GNU/Linux distributions during the next few days. This is a major release and brings numerous new features and improvements across multiple apps, including Dolphin, Konsole, Gwenview, KMail, Akonadi, Cantor, Spectacle, and others. "We continuously work on improving the software included in our KDE Application series, and we hope you will find all the new enhancements and bug fixes useful," reads today's announcement. "More than 120 bugs have been resolved in applications including the Kontact Suite, Ark, Cantor, Dolphin, Gwenview, Kate, Konsole, Okular, Spectacle, Umbrello and more!" Read more

Security Leftovers

  • How to Protect Your PC From the Intel Foreshadow Flaws
  • AT&T Sued After SIM Hijacker Steals $24 Million in Customer's Cryptocurrency
    It has only taken a few years, but the press, public and law enforcement appear to finally be waking up to the problem of SIM hijacking. SIM hijacking (aka SIM swapping or a "port out scam") involves a hacker hijacking your phone number, porting it over to their own device (often with a wireless carrier employee's help), then taking control of your personal accounts. As we've been noting, the practice has heated up over the last few years, with countless wireless customers saying their entire identities were stolen after thieves ported their phone number to another carrier, then took over their private data. Sometimes this involves selling valuable Instagram account names for bitcoin; other times it involves clearing out the target's banking or cryptocurrency accounts. Case in point: California authorities recently brought the hammer down on one 20-year-old hacker, who had covertly ported more than 40 wireless user accounts, in the process stealing nearly $5 million in bitcoin. One of the problems at the core of this phenomenon is that hackers have either tricked or paid wireless carrier employees to aid in the hijacking, or in some instances appear to have direct access to (apparently) poorly-secured internal carrier systems. That has resulted in lawsuits against carriers like T-Mobile for not doing enough to police their own employees, the unauthorized access of their systems, or the protocols utilized to protect consumer accounts from this happening in the first place.
  • Voting Machine Vendors, Election Officials Continue To Look Ridiculous, As Kids Hack Voting Machines In Minutes
  • Security updates for Thursday