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KDE

Desktop Environments, KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Desktop Workspaces In Linux

    Desktop workspaces on Linux are like having a multi-monitor system on your single computer. Developers, artist, audio engineers, etc. would call this "workstation" because they prefer working on individual task concurrently through two or more display monitors, set up on their system.

    However, desktop workspaces quite vary with the "workstation" bit because all multiple displays are virtual and not physical. The desktops are simulated with software, usually your desktop environment.

    So you must be wondering how they might be beneficial for any ordinary user who is not familiar with it. OK, here's my opinion. Desktop workspaces are useful for multi-tasking purpose. Let me run it down with an example, suppose you are interacting with virtual friends on a social media platform and sometime later you decide to upload an image to update your status. But the image isn't quite right to your taste so you launch multiple image editing software on another workspace. You try them out by efficiently switching between windows while the social application is running on another workspace. Once you are done, you close all those image editing programs and finally upload the image to your social feed.

  • Giving KDE developer docs some TLC

    Last month, I had the privilege of coming on board as a documentation specialist to take a closer look at KDE’s developer documentation and to later come up with strategies to make them better than ever. I have talked with some of the community’s developers to get their feedback on some of the areas that need updating or fixing when it comes to technical documentation. But that’s only one part of the story.

    Our dev docs are also meant for new developers. That applies to both new contributors in the KDE community as well as external developers who want to use our software, particularly our excellent KDE Frameworks. In that regard, we’re also looking for feedback on the areas where interested budding rockstar coders and passionate KDE contributors are having trouble getting into the community.

    Having clear, up-to-date, and relevant documentation goes a long way in encouraging and helping new developers get involved with the community with as little friction as possible. It even helps those already manning the ship become familiar with other parts of our software they may not have used before. I would love to hear some thoughts and suggestions, especially from interested KDE hackers, so let me know in the comments below.

  • [Krita] April Development Update

    It’s April already… We’re long overdue for a development update, especially since we haven’t had a new release for quite some time.

    The reason for both those facts is that our maintainer has had some health issues since December that seriously slowed down not just his part of the development work, but also made it really hard to create new releases — all releases are still prepared by one person, and if that person temporarily loses the use of one arm, things that should happen, don’t happen. The arm is back in action, but that wasn’t the only issue, and things are still a bit slowed down.

    Apart from that, we’re making quite good progress towards our next release, which should happen next month.

    In the first place, we’ve got a new full-time developer! Tiar, who is well known in Krita’s Reddit community, graduated from university just when the increased income from Steam made it possible to hire someone to help out with this year’s big goal: bug fixing! Tiar started March 1st, and has already fixed more than a dozen or so tough bugs. Krita now finally has a real Nearest Neighbour scaling method, for instance.

  • New features in Elisa

    I have been quiet for some months but during those months, Elisa has seen many improvements by existing and new contributors and a new stable version is planned in the coming weeks.

    I will publish some blog posts about the many new features implemented in the master branch.

  • Red Hat Certified Engineer Program Changes, OpenStack v19 Released, XFCE Back in openSUSE Installer, GNOME 3.32.1 Marks First Point Release of 3.32

    Now available, GNOME 3.32.1 marks the first point release of GNOME 3.32. And it boasts four weeks worth of bugs fixes.

Updated Qt Installer Released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the new Qt Installer release, based on the Installer Framework 3.1. The main reason for a new installer was that we wanted to provide a more intuitive and streamlined user experience.

We simplified the component tree view by introducing package categories. This has a significantly improved the metadata download performance, as there is no need to load the metadata of all the packages anymore. In addition, it is more intuitive for new users to pick up the right packages instead of selecting everything just in case.

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Slimbook & Kubuntu - Combat Report 7

Filed under
KDE
Hardware
Reviews

When I started my Slimbook & Kubuntu journey, I didn't know where it would end. And I still don't. But half a dozen reports later, I am much more confident into what kind of experience awaits me day in, day out. What I really value in software are two main qualities: stability and predictability, the kind of stuff one must have for their production setup. So far, this laptop and its blob of code are delivering nicely, reliably.

Another facet of this journey is its randomness. I typically have a very strict routine when it comes to distro reviews, but here, I'm letting the challenges surprise me. I am using the system, and if and when a use case occurs, I handle it. For better or worse. Well, you can definitely read all about that in the previous articles. Now, let's see what happened over the last handful of moonrises.

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KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 65

Filed under
KDE

Here’s week 65 in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative, and I’m happy to announce a long-anticipated improvement: High DPI support in Gwenview

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KDE Cantor - Sing me some math

Filed under
KDE
Software
Sci/Tech

It's a song, but it needs refinement. Cantor seems like a clever piece of software, but it lacks refinement and sophistication to match its own goals. I did only test Octave, but I think my findings are pretty indicative. After all, if there were issues with one backend, whatever they are, they need to be fixed. And these weren't trivial issues, either. Slow performance, memory and CPU noise, frozen interface, bad-looking figures.

The configuration also needs to be improved. All in all, it's very difficult doing what Cantor tries, so the idea is really cool. But it seems to be a complex task, and at the moment, it brings more woes than benefits. I'd like to see a smoother integration, and a clever wizard that lets you add backends. Maybe a smart clipboard to share code with other programs. I'd expect a fully HW-accelerated graphics module, so everything responds fast and looks peachy. Finally, Cantor mustn't work any worse than the native engines it represents, because it invalidates its own purpose by doing that (or rather not doing that, hi hi). At the moment, it's a raw product, and it needs a lot of fixes. But me likey, so I will be testing in the future. Unique software, here I go.

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KDE: Applications 19.04 Release Candidate

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KDE

Today KDE released the Release Candidate of the new versions of KDE Applications. With dependency and feature freezes in place, the KDE team's focus is now on fixing bugs and further polishing.

Check the community release notes for information on tarballs and known issues. A more complete announcement will be available for the final release.

The KDE Applications 19.04 releases need a thorough testing in order to maintain and improve the quality and user experience. Actual users are critical to maintaining high KDE quality, because developers simply cannot test every possible configuration. We're counting on you to help find bugs early so they can be squashed before the final release. Please consider joining the team by installing the Release Candidate and reporting any bugs.

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Also: KDE Applications 19.04 Release Candidate Ships

KDE Plasma 5.16 Desktop Promises Much-Improved Login, Logout, and Lock Screens

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment is currently in the works, due for release this summer, and new KDE contributors Filip Fila and Krešimir Čohar have been trying to improve the lock and feel of the login, lock, and logout screens to make them look more modern, usable, and beautiful.

Their work made the login screen more prettier with a toned-down fader effect for the background so you can clearly see the labels, as well as a new magnification effect for the user icons in focus. On the other hand, the logout screen received improved controls with new subtle transparent background, lighted up text, and reworked or new icons.

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Plasma 5.15.4

Filed under
KDE

Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.15.4. Plasma 5.15 was released in February with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience.

This release adds three week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important and include...

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.15.4 Desktop Environment Released with More Than 35 Changes

Qt 3D Studio 2.3 Released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the Qt 3D Studio 2.3 release is now available via the online and offline installers. Here’s a quick summary of the new features and functions in 2.3. For detailed information about the Qt 3D Studio, visit the online documentation page.

The 2.3 release introduces a new font rendering engine based on distance field font rendering. The new renderer is the default starting from 2.3 release onward. The old Qt Painter texture based can be enabled by setting an environment variable Q3DS_DISTANCE_FIELD_DISABLED to 1. The new font rendering also supports pre-generated distance field cache. The new font rendering does require Qt 5.12.2 release, with the earlier Qt releases the text rendering in using the old font rendering.

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Also: Qt 3D Studio 2.3 Debuts With New Font Rendering Engine, Performance Improvements

KDE Connect and Android

Filed under
Android
KDE

As most of you know KDE Connect has recently been removed from Google Play due to a policy violation with regard to our SMS and telephony features. While the public outcry helped to get it back in with all features remaining this is just yet another example of how new Android policies make it harder for us to maintain the level of quality and features you expect from KDE Connect. Android Oreo forced us to drop support for older Android versions and imposed restrictions on background services which force us to have an annoying persistent notification. It is to be expected that Google will further restrict background services which will impose more problems for us. With each new Android versions new restrictions and problems arise which we have to work around, if possible. For example, the upcoming Android Q imposes restrictions on accessing the phone’s clipboard. It is unclear whether the clipboard sync in it’s current form is feasible on Android Q. Those are just examples of the problems with the direction Android is moving towards.

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Also: Krita Interview with D

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More in Tux Machines

KDE: Krita Interview, KDE Developer Documentation and KDE Craft Packager

  • Krita Interview with Anna Hannon
    I opted for trying Linux Mint, and tested Krita as my Photoshop replacement. Love at first sight! I currently run Manjaro KDE and it continues to be my only painting software (even on my Microsoft surface).
  • KDE Developer Documentation Update: Far from the Endgame
    It has been nearly three months since I embarked on an adventure in the land known as dev docs. And while the set period for that work is coming to a close, the truth is that the journey has really only just begun. Just like the pioneers of old, the first important step is to get to survey the land and map it for future adventurers. The KDE community’s developer documentation isn’t exactly new territory but, through the years, it has grown from a garden to a huge forest with only a brave few doing the work to keep things from getting out of hand. They could use a helping hand.
  • KDE Craft Packager on macOS
    In Craft, to create a package, we can use craft --package after the compiling and the installing of a library or an application with given blueprint name. On macOS, MacDMGPackager is the packager used by Craft. The MacDylibBundleris used in MacDMGPackager to handle the dependencies. In this article, I’ll give a brief introduction of the two classes and the improvement which I’ve done for my GSoC project.

10 Best Free Linux Docks

Docks are utility software designed to basically make launching applications and navigating between app windows as easy as possible alongside beautifying the entire process. They implement animations, app icon shadows, customization options, widgets, etc. in different ways but they all aspire to one goal – boost productivity. Read more

15 Best Free Linux Bioinformatics Tools

Bioinformatics has been defined in many different ways, but it is common ground to regard this discipline as the application of mathematics, computing and statistics to the analysis of biological information. The objective of bioinformatics is to enable the finding of new biological insights, and to create a broader, more critical view from which unifying principles in biology can be perceived. Bioinformatics is very important in the field of human genome research. It has become crucial for large-scale measurement technologies such as DNA sequencing, microarrays, and metabolomics. The field of bioinformatics has been aided significantly by Linux-based hardware and software. There are a number of Linux distributions which offer an integrated bioinformatics workstation. The popular distribution Bio-Linux packages hundreds of bioinformatics programs spanning a number of different fields. There’s a wide selection of Linux bioinformatics tools released under an open source license. This article identifies our favorite tools which are extremely useful for anyone interested in sequence analysis, molecular modelling, molecular dynamics, phylogenetic analysis and more. We hope this feature offers a useful resource for biologists. Read more

Games: Quake II RTX, Kerbal Space Program, WonderOS and More

  • Quake II RTX to release June 6th, first 3 levels free for everyone and source code will be up too
    NVIDIA have announced that Quake II RTX, the ray-traced remaster of Quake II is going to release in full with Linux support on June 6th. They've said that anyone will be able to download it and try out the first three levels for free. If you own Quake II, you will be able to play through the campaign in full and play against others online.
  • Kerbal Space Program is getting a big expansion named Breaking Ground, releasing this week
    I haven't really kept up with Kerbal Space Program so I'm a little late on finding this out. On May 30th, the huge Breaking Ground expansion is going to be released. The theme of this expansion is all about exploration, experimentation and technological breakthroughs. It's introducing a bunch of new equipment, some of which you will deploy onto the surface of a planet to do science which sounds fun. There's also new features that will be scattered across the surface of planets for you to study, along with a bunch of new building parts for your craft like hinges, pistons, rotors and more.
  • Gaming-Focused WonderOS To Allow PC And Console Streaming On Android
    The gaming-focused WonderOS is finally in active development after tip-toeing for several years. The operating system belongs to the startup “Wonder”. According to the company’s CEO, Wonder is an “all-in-one” gaming platform. Almost everyone currently working on the team has a rich experience in the gaming industry. According to its website, Wonder currently has ex-employees from Google, Microsoft, SEGA, Razer, Xbox, Sony, etc. Together, the team wants to transform your Android smartphone into the only device you’ll ever play games on.
  • AMD officially announce the "Zen 2" Ryzen 3 series & new RDNA GPU architecture + Intel tease new CPU
    For those looking at their next upgrade, both AMD and Intel have made announcements recently and there's a lot of big stuff coming. On the AMD side, they've officially announce the starting line-up of the Zen 2 core units that make up the Ryzen 3 series processors. To go along with this will be the new X570 chipset for the AM4 socket which supports PCIe 4.0.
  • 2D dodge-em-up 'JUMPGRID' adds an addictive endless mode, my fingers hurt
    JUMPGRID, the 2D fast-paced game where all you do is dodge obstacles is madly addicting and the new endless mode is fantastic.