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KDE

The Book

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KDE

When inviting to the Randa 2014 meeting, Mario had the idea to write a book about KDE Frameworks. Valorie picked up this idea and kicked off a small team to tackle the task. So in the middle of August, Valorie, Rohan, Mirko and me gathered in a small room under the roof of the Randa house and started to ponder how to accomplish writing a book in the week of the meeting. Three days later and with the help of many others, Valorie showed around the first version of the book on her Kindle at breakfast. Mission accomplished.

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KDE Frameworks Sprint - How to Release a Platform

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KDE

KDE Frameworks 5 is the result of two years of hard work porting, tidying, modularizing and refactoring KDELibs4 into a new addition to the Qt 5 platform. In January, Alex Fiestas announced The KDE Barcelona Hub—an office where anyone is welcome to come and work on KDE projects. It was just what the Frameworks team needed to finish off the code so it could be released to the world. Read on for some of what happened.

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Upstream and Downstream: why packaging takes time

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KDE

Here in the KDE office in Barcelona some people spend their time on purely upstream KDE projects and some of us are primarily interested in making distros work which mean our users can get all the stuff we make. I've been asked why we don't just automate the packaging and go and do more productive things. One view of making on a distro like Kubuntu is that its just a way to package up the hard work done by others to take all the credit. I don't deny that, but there's quite a lot to the packaging of all that hard work, for a start there's a lot of it these days.

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Monday Report: Old Style In New Form

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KDE

The basis of this theme is the old oxygen style, so he was able to reuse most of the code. Below are some screenshots of his work (without the Breeze window decoration).

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First Bugfix Update to Plasma 5

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KDE

KDE is now getting into the swing of releases numbered 5. Today we add Plasma 5's first bugfix update. The release features KDE's flagship desktop project as well as the base software needed to keep your computer running. Plasma will have feature releases every three months and bugfix releases in the months in between.

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QML/JS ported to KDevelop 5

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Development
KDE

This screenshot shows the QML/JS KDevelop plugin working as usual, highlighting declarations and uses, finding types, and displaying nice tool-tips. The code-completion also works even if it is not visible on the screenshot. What is interesting is the look of KDevelop: do you see the flatter theme? The colors that are a bit different than usual? This difference is appearance comes from the fact that this is not the usual KDevelop, this is KDevelop 5, based on Qt5 and on the shiny new KDE Frameworks 5.

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Announcing first Inqlude alpha release

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KDE

Three years ago, at Randa 2011, the idea and first implementation of Inqlude, the Qt library archive, was born. So I'm particularly happy today to announce the first alpha release of the Inqlude tool, live from Randa 2014.

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PyKDE5 Status

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Development
KDE

Also note that only Python 3 is supported. It doesn't make sense to support legacy Python versions like 2, especially when developers need to do a port anyway from PyKDE4 to PyKDE5.

Another important reason is that it costs more time and effort to support more configurations. It is no secret to anyone who has followed PyKDE4 development and support just a little bit, will have noticed that my time for KDE is very limited. The situation isn't likely to improve, in fact in a couple months it should get worse if all goes to plan. Smile I see that some people have stepped in to fill the void and fix some of the build and installation problems they have encountered (hi Luca!). This is great and I encourage people to get involved where possible. The hardest part is getting a working dev environment set up, deep C++ knowledge isn't really needed (I certainly don't have deep C++ knowledge!).

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KDE Frameworks 5.1.0 and Plasma 5.0.1 on the horizon

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KDE

You don’t have to remove the KDE 5 packages in order to get logged into your familiar KDE 4 desktop by the way – just choose the appropriate Desktop Environment. As I said, the two environments don’t bite.

One thing you will notice, is how fast the new desktop is. The Plasma Desktop in KDE 5 uses an all-new, fully hardware-accelerated graphics stack on top of Qt5 and the Frameworks5 libraries, and the effect is amazing. Resource usage is still high but the reason for that is known: it is caused by a design issue in KWin and that is currently being worked on.

KDE 5 has been my default desktop for the past week (using Plasma 5.0.0 package), and I hope that the update to Plasma 5.0.1 will fix a couple of pesky bugs.

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First Update to KDE Frameworks 5

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KDE

KDE has today made the first update to KDE Frameworks 5. Frameworks are our addon libraries for Qt applications which provide numberous useful features using peer reviewed APIs and regular monthly updates. This release has 60 different frameworks adding features from Zip file support to Audio file previews, for a full list see KDE's Qt library archive website Inqlude. In this release KAuth gets a backend so you can again add features which require root access, KWallet gets a migration system from its KDELibs 4 version and support has been added for AppStream files.

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Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

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Mesa Gets Closer To Having OpenGL 4.0 Tessellation Support

A significant patch-set was published on Saturday night that implements the driver-independent bits of OpenGL 4's ARB_tessellation_shader extension inside Mesa. The tessellation support has been one of the big pieces missing from Mesa's OpenGL 4 implementation and fortunately it's getting close to mainline. Chris Forbes of Intel published fifty-six patches this weekend that implement the driver-independent portions of the extension inside Mesa. Of course, the driver portions still need to follow for it to be useful. Read more

Small Console Menu Utilities

One of the great strengths of Linux is the whole raft of weird and wonderful open source utilities. That strength does not simply derive from the functionality they offer, but from the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with applications. The Unix philosophy spawned a "software tools" movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects. Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well on their own. This article looks at four tiny utilities that offer menu facilities. They get virtually zero coverage in the Linux press, so you may not have heard of them before, but they are well crafted and might just fit the bill. Read more