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KDE

Release of KDE Elisa 0.2

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KDE
  • 0.2 Release of Elisa

    Elisa is a music player developed by the KDE community that strives to be simple and nice to use. We also recognize that we need a flexible product to account for the different workflows and use-cases of our users.

  • KDE Elisa 0.2 Released For Improving The Music Experience On The Plasma Desktop

    Elisa 0.2 is now available as the second release for this Qt/KDE Plasma focused open-source music player.

    Back in April was the Elisa 0.1 release while out today is Elisa 0.2, which continues working on adding more features to this music player. Elisa 0.2 adds new music browsing views, user-interface improvements, general performance improvements, MPRIS2 support improvements, cover image handling enhancements, and various other additions.

LibreOffice and Plasma

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KDE
LibO

At KDAB, we know that consistency is an important aspect of the User Experience – users don’t want to have to learn different ways to achieve the same thing. In the Linux world, there is a major structural pitfall to this: the applications written for Linux come in at least two major technologies – Qt and GTK. Each of these frameworks deeply influences the experience the user has, and in different ways. As you’d expect, the frameworks have their own helper-dialogs e.g. to open or save a file or for printing. This can make it confusing for users, when the apps they use don’t show the same helper-dialogs for common actions.

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KDE: Kdenlive, LabPlot and KConfigXT

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KDE
  • ‘Next Gen’ Kdenlive Is Almost Here — But It Needs Your Help

    A brand new beta of the ‘next-generation’ Kdenlive video editor is now available to download.

  • Kdenlive's Significantly Refactored Video Editor Is Now Ready For Testing

    Developers working hard on the Kdenlive open-source video editor are preparing to unveil their significantly refactored code-base in the upcoming KDE Applications 18.08 release. But for helping weed out the bugs, you can now test an AppImage for this big release that is nearly two years in the making.

    The new Kdenlive video editor now automatically separates clips having both video and audio tracks, reliable slow motion video support, timeline improvements, insert/life/overwrite should now be working reliably, KDE Purpose library support, support for generating lower-resolution video in the timeline preview for faster rendering, better keyboard layout changing support, and various other enhancements.

  • Kdenlive: test the future

    After more than 1.5 years of work, we are planning to release the refactoring version of Kdenlive in august, part of the KDE 18.08 Applications release. But taking such a decision is not easy. Most of the code was rewritten, which also means many possible regressions. So while we are very excited to have the opportunity to finally release our work to the public, it’s also a bit stressful. So what now ?

  • Support for MQTT has evolved in LabPlot

    Hey guys. It's been a while since my last post, however we haven't lazed since then. We solved the problems presented in the previous post, and also implemented the "next steps". To get in the picture you may want to read the previous post.

    So let's just go through the new things step by step. I'll try to explain the respective feature, and also give examples using videos or screenshots.

    The biggest problem was that these topics are completely INDIVIDUAL, so they may send totally different amount of data (this amount of data may differ from message to message as well, given one topic) and this hasn't made possible putting the data of these messages in the same container (spreadsheet). The idea used for the solution came from my mentor Kristóf and his former mentor Alexander Semke.

  • Use KConfigXT, but use with Care.

    Imagine that you are a happy developer living a happy life sending patches for some random terminal emulator that you know and love. Imagine also that you see a strange pattern in code and you know that you can write in a better way, and you do. Code looks fine, code looks correct, code looks pretty and it also does a massive cleanup on the number of lines of code. Now also imagine that you are pretty confident that you are actually doing something good for mankind.

KDE Development: Konsole, Falkon and More

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KDE
  • KDE Finally Offers An Easy Global Shortcut To Launch The Konsole

    KDE finally has an on-by-default easy way global shortcut for launching the Konsole terminal application.

    Beginning with KDE Applications 18.08 due out next month, Ctrl + Alt + T will launch the Konsole. There had been an off-by-default option for this functionality in KHotKeys while now Konsole itself will expose this global launching shortcut.

  • [Falkon] Seventh week of coding phase, GSoC'18

    The Events API exposes the Key, Mouse and Wheel events. The properties like mousePress, mouseDoubleClick, keyPress, etc are added to QmlPluginInterface class which on set to a JavaScript function will register the plugin for that event & will call the function with proper arguments (containing event & object on which the event is triggered) when the event is triggered.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 25
  • Second Weekly Post

    To make the code easier to manage, I created a class called KoColorSetEntryGroup to handle an actual matrix of colors. This was done in KoColorSet, but that is kind of illogical. As a KoColorSet has several matrices of colors; it should be a containter of matrices of colors instead of colors themselves. KoColorSetEntryGroup is too long a name to use, so I renamed it to be KisSwatchGroup. KoColorSetEntry should be renamed to KisSwatch, too, of course, but KoColorSetEntry is used in too many places in the code base. I don’t want to do the renaming now. Lots of the usages of KoColorSetEntry are going to be changed while I’m modifying the data management of a KoColorSet, and that means if I do the renaming now, lots of the renaming will eventually be lost. Therefore, currently KisSwatch is just a placeholder. It’s now an empty subclass of KoColorSetEntry, waiting for everything to be moved from its parent into it.

KDE and Qt Leftovers

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KDE
  • Easily building and testing KDE applications into a separate prefix

    When developing your projects you will often need to install them somewhere safe. On my system I have a prefix full build of all Qt, KDE software, but this doesn’t work when we just want to work on an application or want to test a build in someone else’s system.

    Installing to /usr doesn’t feel right, /usr/local isn’t that much helpful either, so what I usually do is to create a sub-directory in /opt (e.g. /opt/discover, /opt/kalgebra), then it was a matter of having the session point at the right place. This is why I submitted a small change in ECM that generates a prefix.sh that sets the right environment variables.
    This was merged a while ago, so it should be part of any distribution by now.

  • Krita 4.1 Open-Source Digital Painting App Lets Users Save and Load Sessions

    The Krita Foundation announced the release of Krita 4.1, the first major update of the open-source and cross-platform application since the release of the Krita 4.0 series earlier this year.

    Highlights of the Krita 4.1 release include the ability to save and load sessions that can include a set of images and views, support for creating multi-monitor workspace layouts, improved workflow when working with animation frames, and better animation timeline display.

    Krita 4.1 also enables handling of larger animation files by buffering rendered frames to the local disk drive, replaces the old reference images docker with an all-new reference images tool, adds a mixing option to the color picker tool, and improves the performance of brush masks through vectorization.

  • Free Painting Software Krita 4.1.0 Released With New Reference Images Tool, Option To Save And Load Sessions, More

    Krita, the free and open source raster / vector graphics editor, was updated to version 4.1. The new release includes major new features like a new reference images tool, option to save and load sessions, multi-monitor workspace layouts, among others.

  • 正式发布Qt 5.11

KDE: Krita Refactoring, KDE Plasma 5.12.6, KDE's 2017 Community Report

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KDE
  • The Awful Dilemma

    I like fixing bugs… It makes people happy who have their bugs fixed, it makes Krita better, and it can be done in relatively small time laps. And it gives one a sense of having been usefully productive to go to the weekly bug summary, and see oneself in the top-five of bug resolvers. Not that I’m there right now, though I was last week, because sometimes one has to dig deeper.

    These weeks I’m working on refactoring Krita’s resource systems. Resource in graphics app parlance are things like brushes, gradients, patterns — mostly small files that are stored somewhere on disk and that are loaded on start up. This code dates back to 2000 or so and was originally designed for a world where people would have a few dozen of each resource installed, and where brushes and patterns wouldn’t be bigger than 64 x 64 pixels.

  • KDE Plasma 5.12.6 LTS Point Release Brings Better Support for Snap, Flatpak Apps

    The KDE Project released the sixth point release of the long-term supported KDE Plasma 5.12 desktop environment to address various issues in an attempt to increase the overall stability and reliability of the desktop.

    KDE Plasma 5.12.6 LTS comes almost two months after the KDE Plasma 5.12.5 LTS point release to add no less than 113 fixes across several components, including Plasma Desktop, Plasma Workspace, Plasma Discover, System Settings, Plasma NetworkManager (plasma-nm), plasma-integration, Milou, KWin, KSysGuard, Info Center, KDE Hotkeys, and Plasma Add-ons.

  • KDE's 2017 Community Report Is Now Available

    KDE e.V. has published their annual report for 2017 to cover the software advancements made for this open-source desktop environment, highlight their financial health, etc.

The KDE e.V. Community Report for 2017 is now available

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KDE

KDE's yearly report gives a comprehensive overview of all that has happened during 2017. It covers the progress we have made with KDE's Plasma desktop environment; Plasma Mobile (KDE's graphical environment for mobile devices); and applications the community creates to stimulate your productivity, creativity, education, and fun.

The report also looks at KDE's activities during 2017, giving details on the results from community sprints, conferences, and external events the KDE community has participated in worldwide. It also covers what is probably the most important community milestone of 2017: defining and agreeing on what are the most important global goals, goals that will direct the efforts of KDE community members for years to come.

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Also: Those top Konsole Contributors

KDE Development and KDAB in European Events

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KDE
  • From nothing to Top 20 Contributors of Konsole in less than a Month

    The title seems to be a bit bragging but it’s actually the opposite, KDE is a team of volunteers that work for free on their spare time to create awesomeness, and there’s not a single person being paid by the KDE e.V to work on KDE. Of course there are companies that hire developers to work for kde related software, but those are third parties and unrelated to how KDE software is developed as a whole, for instance I work as a developer in a Fintech that has *nothing* to do related do KDE.

  • GSoC’18 – Phase 2(Week 1 and 2)

    I also improved the text tool, which now supports the default activity font-family with bold, italic, adjustable font sizes and a variety of colors.

  • KDAB at Meet Qt in Paris

    Thanks for joining us for this year’s edition of Meet Qt that took place in Paris on the 19th June.

    The focus this year was medical and automotive and the event was again very successful despite the train strikes.

  • KDAB at Italian C++, Milan

    KDAB was sponsor of this annual C++ event run by the C++ Community for the C++ Community in Italy, which was founded some five years ago and is growing fast.

KDE: Krita, Qt 3D Studio, and Bug Fixes

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KDE
  • Krita 4.1 Released With Support For Multi-Monitor Workspace Layouts

    Krita 4.1 is now the latest stable version of this open-source digital painting program.

  • Optimizing Circular Gaussian Mask, Krita:GSoC

    Previous implementation was based on a slow scalar model, calculating each mask value per coordinate. I implement a new vectorized code using Vc library to allow a robust SIMD usage, calculating the mask values in parallel. Not all operations are implemented on Vc data types, especially erf had to be implemented for Vc data types. The new implementation shows to be up to 10 times faster (on my system) on mask generation. Given that the mask generation requires the most computing on brush stroke generation, this speed improvement holds up even in the full brush stroke benchmarks. Given the way it is implemented the code can become faster as future SIMD registers grows on future CPUs.

  • What’s in a Qt 3D Studio Scene?

    Now that Qt 3D Studio 2.0 has been released, let’s look at what some of the new features enable. In particular, we will visit the so-called in-scene debug and profile views, as these handy, built-in (both to the viewer launched from the editor and, if the developer decides so, to applications) views allow answering questions like What happens between loading a scene and issuing OpenGL draw commands?, Is this 3D scene too heavy?, How much graphics resources does this scene use?, or Is there any chance this scene will perform on this or that embedded hardware?

  • This Week in KDE, Part 4 : Bug Fixes!

Krita 4.1.0 Released

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KDE

Three months after the release of Krita 4.0, we’re releasing Krita 4.1!

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Android Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • 8 hurdles IT must overcome if they want open source success
    Open source software has the potential to drive innovation and collaboration across an enterprise, and can transform the way developers work together. "Open source is now part of the evaluation criteria when deciding on a software platform, so much so that it is expected," said Matt Ingenthron, senior director of engineering at Couchbase. "In this way, open source has somewhat faded into the background in a positive way. Just like no consumer would inquire if a mobile phone had internet access or text messaging, choosing an open source solution is almost always an option."
  • Sprint calls on open source analytics to prevent cyberfraud
    Mobile phone-related fraud is big business. Fraudsters, hackers, and other bad actors employ creative techniques to compromise networks, hijack user information, and piece together customer identities that are then sold for big bucks on the dark web. To protect its customers, Sprint needed to transform the way it detected and blocked fraudulent activity. “In the mobile phone business, there’s no markup on selling devices — our bread and butter is the network and the services that are delivered on that network, through the devices,” says Scott Rice, CIO of Sprint. “Identity theft is a huge problem and the ability for nefarious actors to use that theft of information to impersonate our customers means we were eating the costs of the devices and the costs of services delivery.”
  • Open Source Platform Delivers LDAP Integration
    The latest release of InfluxData, an open source platform for metrics, events, and other time series data, adds LDAP integration, new advanced analytics, and self-healing capabilities in the time series database platform. According to the company, time series data, collected and stored with InfluxData’s Time Series database platform is integral to observability and is becoming mission critical for organizations. Enhancements to InfluxEnterprise make it easier for administrators to keep this mission critical data available and secure by checking and verifying every requested action. This includes creating databases, storing data and running queries – against a user’s stored authorizations and role.
  • YOYOW-WeCenter Special Edition Release: Free and Open Source
    The YOYOW-WeCenter Special Edition, customized and developed by YOYOW and based on WeCenter Q&A community framework, has been released on GitHub. Compared to regular WeCenter frameworks, YOYOW is providing free open source services and will be continually iterating products and will be introducing an incentive mechanism. Each Q&A community can directly integrate into YOYOW's bottom layer network and enjoy the network services provided by YOYOW.
  • Add-on Recommended By Mozilla Caught Logging Users’ Browsing History
    According to the reports by Mike Kuketz, an independent security blogger from Germany and uBlock Origin, an add-on named “Web Security” has been caught collecting users’ browsing history. [...] Soon after this discovery by Hill, Kuketz added a post on his blog about the same extension pointing to the same strange behavior of the add-on. A user on Kuketz’s blog decoded the garbled data and found that the add-on was collecting users’ browsing history and sending it to a German server.
  • Zombies: Top 5 Open Source Vulnerabilities That Refuse To Die [Ed: Microsoft partner WhiteSource continues to stigmatise FOSS as a security nightmare, using bugs branded by other Microsoft partner for extra panic]
  • How a civic hacker used open data to halve tickets at Chicago's most confusing parking spot
    Matt Chapman used the Freedom of Information Act to get the City of Chicago's very mess parking ticket data; after enormous and heroic data normalization, Chapman was able to pinpoint one of the city's most confusing parking spots, between 1100-1166 N State St, which cycled between duty as a taxi-stand and a parking spot with a confusingly placed and semi-busted parking meter. After surveying the site and deducing the problem, Chapman contacted the alderman responsible for that stretch of North State Street, and, eight months later, the signage was cleaned up and made more intuitive. Followup data analysis showed that Chapman's work had halved the number of parking tickets issued on the spot, with 600-odd fewer tickets in the past 20 months, for a savings of $60,000 to Chicago motorists.
  • Bluespec, Inc. Releases a New Family of Open-Source RISC-V Processors
    Bluespec Inc. has released Piccolo, its first in a family of RISC-V open-source processors provided as a vehicle for open innovation in embedded systems. Piccolo is a 3-stage RV32IM processor whose small “footprint” is ideal for many IoT applications. The repository (https://github.com/bluespec/Piccolo) contains a royalty-free synthesizable Verilog core that can be easily integrated and deployed into an ASIC or FPGA. Bluespec, Inc. will actively maintain Piccolo. It also offers commercial-grade tools for the customization and verification of RISC-V cores. Configurations will be continually added to provide the full spectrum of embedded controller features. Companies or universities interested in contributing to the Piccolo project should contact Bluespec, Inc. (add contact – RISC-V open source support).

KDE Applications 18.08 Open-Source Software Suite Released, Here's What's New

Being in development for the past several months, KDE Applications 18.08 goes stable today and will hit the software repositories of various popular GNU/Linux distributions during the next few days. This is a major release and brings numerous new features and improvements across multiple apps, including Dolphin, Konsole, Gwenview, KMail, Akonadi, Cantor, Spectacle, and others. "We continuously work on improving the software included in our KDE Application series, and we hope you will find all the new enhancements and bug fixes useful," reads today's announcement. "More than 120 bugs have been resolved in applications including the Kontact Suite, Ark, Cantor, Dolphin, Gwenview, Kate, Konsole, Okular, Spectacle, Umbrello and more!" Read more

Security Leftovers

  • How to Protect Your PC From the Intel Foreshadow Flaws
  • AT&T Sued After SIM Hijacker Steals $24 Million in Customer's Cryptocurrency
    It has only taken a few years, but the press, public and law enforcement appear to finally be waking up to the problem of SIM hijacking. SIM hijacking (aka SIM swapping or a "port out scam") involves a hacker hijacking your phone number, porting it over to their own device (often with a wireless carrier employee's help), then taking control of your personal accounts. As we've been noting, the practice has heated up over the last few years, with countless wireless customers saying their entire identities were stolen after thieves ported their phone number to another carrier, then took over their private data. Sometimes this involves selling valuable Instagram account names for bitcoin; other times it involves clearing out the target's banking or cryptocurrency accounts. Case in point: California authorities recently brought the hammer down on one 20-year-old hacker, who had covertly ported more than 40 wireless user accounts, in the process stealing nearly $5 million in bitcoin. One of the problems at the core of this phenomenon is that hackers have either tricked or paid wireless carrier employees to aid in the hijacking, or in some instances appear to have direct access to (apparently) poorly-secured internal carrier systems. That has resulted in lawsuits against carriers like T-Mobile for not doing enough to police their own employees, the unauthorized access of their systems, or the protocols utilized to protect consumer accounts from this happening in the first place.
  • Voting Machine Vendors, Election Officials Continue To Look Ridiculous, As Kids Hack Voting Machines In Minutes
  • Security updates for Thursday