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KDE

KDE: KDEnlive, KDE ISO Image Writer and Interview With Young Krita Artist Asja Flaim

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KDE
  • KDEnlive: An Open Source Non Linear Video Editor for Linux

    The most powerful visual media – video can deliver what texts can’t. Since watching video is how one-third of online users spend time on, videos, however, editing could be more powerful, attention-grabbing, and inspiring.

    Now, creating and professionally editing videos on Linux has become surprisingly complicated. It may be because choices for such software are not visible. To that end, I decided to discuss an outstanding video editor for Linux platforms.

  • KDE ISO Image Writer – Revamping the UI

    As part of GSoC 2019, I am working on KDE ISO Image Writer which is a tool to write ISO images to USB flash drives.

  • Interview with Asja Flaim

    When I got my PC and my Huion 191 tablet as a Christmas gift, Krita was installed on the PC.

KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 74

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KDE

Now that Plasma 5.16 is frozen and almost out the door, we’ve started turning our attentions to Plasma 5.17. One of the big features I’m pushing on is a visual evolution of the Breeze theme. The first component just landed: KWin-generated window borders are now off by default for the Breeze theme! Don’t worry, this doesn’t mean you have to aim for a single pixel to to resize windows; there are virtual resize areas just the same size as the old window borders so the behavior is unchanged. It also has no effect on other themes, many of which have big, beautiful borders that stand out as part of the theme’s design. But Breeze is a minimalistic theme, and this is the first step towards modernizing the look and feel of KDE apps. We think you’re really going to love the final result!

Read more

KDE Frameworks 5.59.0

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KDE

KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.59.0.

KDE Frameworks are over 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the KDE Frameworks web page.

This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

Read more

Also: KDE Frameworks 5.59 Brings More Fixes

KDE: GCompris, Akademy and GSoC

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KDE
  • Multiple Datasets: Overview

    For Google Summer of Code 2019, I am working on KDE community's project Gcompris. GCompris is a high quality educational software suite, including a large number of activities for children aged 2 to 10. Currently GCompris offers more than 100 activities, and more are being developed. For me the journey from making my first contribution to Gcompris, to my Google Summer of Code Project has been very interesting, and in this post I'll be discussing about my GSoC project i.e Adding multiple datasets to Gcompris

  • I'm going to Akademy!

    Akademy is free to attend however you need to register to reserve your space, so head to https://akademy.kde.org/2019/register and press the buttons.

    Akademy is very important to meet people, discuss future plans, learn about new stuff and make friends for life!

    Note this year the recommended accomodations are a bit on the expensive side, so you may want to hurry and apply for Travel support. The last round is open until July 1st.

  • GSoC’19 Project : Milestone 1

    After a couple weeks of discussions, bug reporting, fixing and coding with lots of people from the KDE Community, KNotifications can now be used for applications targeted towards the Windows 10 OS. Yes! KNotifications could well be supporting Windows 10 native notifications within the next couple releases.

    Any and all KDE applications using KNotifications need not change their code base to enjoy this new feature! More details follow:-

KDE: Kdenlive Scores Another Big Bug Fix Update, Krita at the 2019 Libre Graphics Meeting

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KDE
  • Kdenlive Scores Another Big Bug Fix Update

    “The second minor release of the 19.04 series is out with 77 bug fixes and minor usability improvements. Among the highlights for this release are fixes for compositing issues, misbehaving guides/markers and grouping inconsistencies,” they say.

    The Kdenlive Windows build — yup, the app is also available for Windows — has also been updated to better support dark themes (by showing white icons) and slideshows.

    Although not part of this release, the Kdenlive team say work has begun on a revamp of the Titler feature. This is being done as part of the Google Summer of Code (GSoC), so expect to hear further updates on that effort soon.

    You can download an AppImage of Kdenlive 19.0.4.2 right now from the Kdenlive servers. AppImages don’t need to be installed, work on virtually every Linux distro, and contain all the dependencies required to run.

  • Krita at the 2019 Libre Graphics Meeting

    Krita project maintainer Boudewijn gave the first presentation, State of the Libre Graphics. It was recorded, but the videos have not been announced yet. The link goes to the slides. This presentation is a sort of a mix between a keynote and an update on what all of the libre graphics projects have been doing since the last LGM. There were were about thirty projects who had sent in slides, which is about double from last year. Libre graphics is healthy!

    Other things that were going on were discussions about spot colors with Jan Peter Homann from Freie Farbe. Spot colors aren’t much used by creative painters, but people who design magazine covers, packaging or similar things often need them. Freie Farbe’s spot colors are defined in Lab, which theoretically makes adding support to Krita for their system very easy.

    There were other discussions about how projects could give users support, an introduction into hacking on Blender, a presentation of Krita’s new HDR capabilities and much, much more.

    Boudewijn attended the Inkscape hackfest, and invited an Inkscape developer to the 2020 Krita Sprint, which will likely be in Rennes. Inter-project communication is important!

Kdenlive 19.04.2 is out

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KDE

The second minor release of the 19.04 series is out with 77 bug fixes and minor usability improvements. Among the highlights for this release are fixes for compositing issues, misbehaving guides/markers and grouping inconsistencies. The Windows version also comes with improvements such as slideshow import and dark themes have now white icons (enable “Force Breeze Icon Theme” under settings). See the full list of commits down below.

As previously stated this cycle is focused on polishing the rough edges post the code refactoring and a whopping 118 fixes have been submitted in the last two months alone. We ask the community to keep testing and reporting issues on our gitlab instance or join us on IRC (#kdenlive) or Telegram.

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KDE and GNOME: Digital Atelier/Krita, Akademy 2019 and GNOME/Mutter Accessibility

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KDE
GNOME
  • Digital Atelier: Painter Brushes and Video Tutorials Now 50% Off

    To celebrate the new release, we’re doing a 50% off sale of Digital Atelier, Ramon Miranda’s painterly brushes and tutorials pack for the rest of this month! Get Digital Atelier in the Krita shop!

  • Akademy 2019 registration now open

    Once you have registered, take a look at our guide on how to travel to Milan and check out the accommodation we have arranged and recommend for attendees. We also have a guide on how to get from different locations within Milan to Akademy. This guide also includes information on how to move around the city in general -- useful for sightseeing!

    IMPORTANT: All attendees are expected to read and required to follow Akademy's Code of Conduct.

  • GNOME 3.34's Mutter Adds Mouse Accessibility Support For X11/Wayland

    Up to now the GNOME desktop has offered mouse accessibility support using the long-standing Mousetweaks program that allows for different actions to take place all from the lone input device for those that may be limited to manipulating only one button or other limitations around this primary input device. But GNOME's Mousetweaks only works with X11 so now Mutter has picked up mouse accessibility support itself that works on both X11 and Wayland sessions.

10 Reasons to Use KDE as Linux Desktop Environment

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KDE

KDE Plasma is a free, powerfully flexible and open source widget-based Desktop Environment primarily created for Linux systems by the KDE project. Originally, KDE was an acronym for Kool Desktop Environment until it was changed to be the “K Desktop Environment“. That notwithstanding, KDE Plasma hasn’t stopped being kool. In fact, it is among the coolest Linux desktop environments on the planet.

You might have been looking up a list of desktop environments to switch to. Or perhaps, you want to decide which DE best matches your taste. You’re reading the right blog because below are 10 solid reasons why your choice should be KDE Plasma.

Read more

KDE: Usability/Productivity, Privacy Sprint, and Libre Graphics Meeting

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KDE
  • KDE Usability and Productivity: Are we there yet?

    There’s still more to do, of course. KIO still doesn’t mount network locations locally, though that’s being actively worked on! Touchpad scrolling behavior has improved, but is still not consistent across all KDE apps and there’s no inertial scrolling yet. Samba sharing is improving, but still rough. Okular’s annotations are becoming more full-featured, compatible, and discoverable, yet more work is still needed. More System Settings pages still need to have their user interface overhauled. But are you seeing a pattern here!? Things are happening! The trajectory is really good! It’s unbelievable how many of the rough edges have gotten smoothed out over the past two years, and I feel super upbeat about the state of KDE’s software offering!

    With this kind of ongoing work, KDE’s software moves ever closer to the day when I envision that it has become humanity’s preeminent computing platform. It will take time, but open-source software is immortal as long as people care about it. And the KDE community clearly does! So slowly but surely we continue, improving year by year as competitors stagnate, drop out, or are corrupted by the lures of money and power. It will be a KDE world.

  • KDE Has Made Much Progress On Usability/Productivity, But They're Still Aiming For More

    Excellent KDE blogger Nate Graham has blogged about the work done over the past roughly two years be he and others on improving the usability and productivity of this Linux desktop. Long story short, a lot of progress has been made by the KDE development community but more work remains.

    Among the achievements he cited were better handling/configuring for libinput on X11/Wayland, a new notification system, UI improvements, performance improvements around Baloo, showing file creation dates on supported file-systems, better lock/log-in screens, and much more.

  • KDE Privacy Sprint, 2019 Edition

    During the sprint, we floated a lot of different ideas that sparked plenty of discussions. The notion of privacy encompasses a wide range of topics, technologies and methods, so it is often difficult to decide what to focus on. However, all the aspects we worked on are important. We ended up tackling a variety of issues, and we are confident that our contributions will improve data protection for all users of KDE software.

    Both Sandro Knauß and Volker Krause regularly work on KDE's Kontact suite (email, calendar, contacts, etc.), but this time they took on network-related issues. One of the problems is that there are still too many http links (instead of secure https links) within our codebase. This is a threat to users' communication, as http connections - and hence all the messages that travel over them - are unencrypted.

    To make it easier for all KDE developers, Sandro and Volker wrote an ECM-injected global unit test. The test gets added to every application and prints out warnings about http links used in your code. Another script tries to update all the links in your codebase to use https, but checks beforehand if the https links would work. For example, sourceforge.org subdomains don't provide a certificate, so the script would ignore those.

  • Timothee Giet (Animtim): LGM 2019 is finished, preparing for 2020

    We are back from Saarbrücken where was the Libre Graphics Meeting this year. As usual it was a great event, with plenty of interesting talks and workshops, and full of awesome developers and users of Free Software graphics applications.

    I’m not going to make a detailed report as many people already did around the web. However, I must talk about something special this time: our proposal to organize next LGM in our city has been officially approved, so prepare to join us in Rennes for the Libre Graphics Meeting in 2020!

    If you want to help us or support this event, you can contact the LGM mailing list, or drop me an email directly.

GNOME and KDE: Argos, Konsole and ask.krita.org

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KDE
GNOME
  • Argos Is Like BitBar For Gnome Shell: It Shows Scripts Output On The Panel (Top Bar)

    Searching for a way to show a script output on the Gnome Shell panel (top bar), I came across Argos. This Gnome Shell extension does only one thing: it adds a new item with a dropdown menu to the panel, showing the output from a script and exposing functionality.

    The extension is inspired by BitBar, a popular program to put the output from any script on the macOS menu bar, and it's even compatible with most BitBar scripts.

  • Hello new Konsole

    Konsole has been ready for many many years, and got almost 10 years without anything really exciting being added, mostly because the software is ready, why should we modify something that works to add experimental features?

    But then the reality kicked in, konsole missed some features that are quite nice and existed in Terminator, Tilix and other new terminals, but Tilix now lacks a developer, and Terminator is also not being actively developed (with the last release being it in 26 of February of 2017)

  • Retiring ask.krita.org

    About a year ago, we created the ask.krita.org website. We wanted to have a stack-exchange like place, where people could report problems, after searching whether their problems had already been discussed, where people could help each other.

    Maybe it was the platform we were using, maybe it’s that people who are using Krita have a different mindset from people for whom stack-exchange like sites work, but we came to realize that ask.krita.org did not work out.

  • Chrome 75 Released, ask.krita.org Website Retiring, LinuxGizmos Publishes Its Spring 2019 SBC Catalog, LibreOffice 6.3 Beta 1 Is Ready for Testing and Happy 15th to Phoronix

    The ask.krita.org website, a stack-exchange-like place for people to report problems and help each other, is being retired. According to the post, the problems were "Nobody seemed to be searching whether their problems had already been discussed and maybe solved, so the same questions were being asked again and again. Nobody seemed to stay around and engage with the people who were trying to help them, and nobody seemed to stay around to help other people." The team is looking for a replacement, but isn't sure quite what that will be yet.

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More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, FLOSS Weekly, Test and Code

  • LHS Episode #292: Digital Operation Deep Dive

    Welcome to Episode 292 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts are joined by Rob, KA2PBT, in a deep disucussion of digital mode operation on the amateur radio bands including what modes are available, the technology behind the creation and operation of those modes and even dive into current controversy behind FCC rules regarding encryption, PACTOR-4 and much more. Thank you for tuning in and we hope you have a wonderful week.

  • FLOSS Weekly 538: Leo Laporte

    Randal Schwartz and Jonathan Bennett talk to Leo Laporte about FLOSS's history and the TWiT Network.

  • Test and Code: 81: TDD with flit

    In the last episode, we talked about going from script to supported package. I worked on a project called subark and did the packaging with flit. Today's episode is a continuation where we add new features to a supported package and how to develop and test a flit based package.

Windows vs Ubuntu

Kubuntu is my favorite derivative of all the Ubuntu-based operating systems. I can not point out any features as favorite because I like all of them. Everything mentioned above is part of my daily workflow. Now when you know all of this it is worth trying them out. I was skeptical at first but later when I built my flow and learned how to utilize these features I can do everything faster, with fewer keystrokes and the most important thing is that I have a nicely organized desktop that helps me to minimize brain fatigue while doing my job. Kubuntu is a great distro to switch to if you’re coming from Windows. They have a quite similar UI, and Kubuntu has all the features Windows has, plus more. Read more

KDE: KDevelop 5.3.3 Released, Latte Dock Update and Release of Kaidan 0.4.1

  • KDevelop 5.3.3 released

    We today provide a stabilization and bugfix release with version 5.3.3. This is a bugfix-only release, which introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using a previous version of KDevelop 5.3. You can find a Linux AppImage as well as the source code archives on our download page. Windows installers are no longer offered, we are looking for someone interested to take care of that.

  • Latte, Documentation and Reports...

    First Latte beta release for v0.9.0 is getting ready and I am really happy about it :) . But today instead of talking for the beta release I am going to focus at two last minute "arrivals" for v0.9; that is Layouts Reports and Documentation. If you want to read first the previous article you can do so at Latte and "Flexible" settings...

  • Kaidan 0.4.1 released!

    After some problems were encountered in Kaidan 0.4.1, we tried to fix the most urgent bugs.

Security: Linux 5.2 Dissection, New Patches, New ZDNet (CBS) FUD and Kali NetHunter App Store

  • Kees Cook: security things in Linux v5.2

    Gustavo A. R. Silva is nearly done with marking (and fixing) all the implicit fall-through cases in the kernel. Based on the pull request from Gustavo, it looks very much like v5.3 will see -Wimplicit-fallthrough added to the global build flags and then this class of bug should stay extinct in the kernel. That’s it for now; let me know if you think I should add anything here. We’re almost to -rc1 for v5.3!

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (libreoffice), Red Hat (thunderbird), SUSE (ardana and crowbar, firefox, libgcrypt, and xrdp), and Ubuntu (nss, squid3, and wavpack).

  • Malicious Python libraries targeting Linux servers removed from PyPI [Ed: Python does not run only on Linux, but Microsoft-funded sites like ZDNet (CBS) look for ways to blame everything on "Linux", even malicious software that gets caught in the supply chain]
  • Malicious Python Libraries Discovered on PyPI, Offensive Security Launches the Kali NetHunter App Store, IBM Livestreaming a Panel with Original Apollo 11 Technicians Today, Azul Systems Announces OpenJSSE and Krita 4.2.3 Released

    Offensive Security, the creators of open-source Kali Linux, has launched the Kali NetHunter App Store, "a new one stop shop for security relevant Android applications. Designed as an alternative to the Google Play store for Android devices, the NetHunter store is an installable catalogue of Android apps for pentesting and forensics". The press release also notes that the NetHunter store is a slightly modified version of F-Droid: "While F-Droid installs its clients with telemetry disabled and asks for consent before submitting crash reports, the NetHunter store goes a step further by removing the entire code to ensure that privacy cannot be accidentally compromised". See the Kali.org blog post for more details.