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KDE

Meet the Slimbook Excalibur, a 15″ Aluminium Linux Laptop

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Spanish computer company Slimbook has unsheathed its latest Linux laptop — the mighty 15.6-inch Slimbook Excalibur.

Their largest laptop to date, the Excalibur is forged entirely from aluminium (think MacBook), cutting itself a prime spot alongside the more nimble 13″ Slimbook KDE laptop.

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Qt 5.9 Beta 3, KDE Neon, and Krita

Filed under
KDE
  • Qt 5.9 beta3 available

    Qt 5.9 beta3 is now available. Instructions how to get the release are here: https://wiki.qt.io/How_to_get_snapshot_via_online_installer. Diff to second beta can be found as an attachment.

  • Qt 5.9 Beta 3 Now Available

    For those looking forward to the upcoming Qt 5.9 tool-kit release, the third beta is now shipping.

    Qt release manager Jani Heikkinen has announced the Qt 5.9 Beta 3 release for testing and is encouraging users/developers to try it out to find bugs/regressions ahead of the planned release possibly at the end of May but could be delayed into June.

  • Has anyone used KDE Neon aside from myself?

    I love it so much so that it's now my daily driver (having completely erased Windows whereas I normally dual-boot).

  • Krita 3.1.3 Update Lets You Run Multiple Instances of the Digital Painting App

    Today, May 1, Krita Foundation proudly announced the release and general availability of the third maintenance update to the Krita 3.1 stable series of the open-source digital painting app for all supported platforms.

    Shipping with a ton of bug fixes, as well as a handful of cool new features, Krita 3.1.3 is here two months after the previous update to implement an option that finally allows users to run multiple instances of the app. It also implements the Cut, Copy, Paste, and Object Ordering context menu actions for the default tool.

Krita 3.1.3 Released

Filed under
KDE
  • Krita 3.1.3

    Today we’re proud to release Krita 3.1.3. A ton of bug fixes, and some nice new features as well! Dmitry and Boud have taken a month off from implementing Kickstarter features to make Krita 3.1.3 as good and solid as we could make it. Thanks to all the people who have tested the alpha, the beta and the release candidate! Thanks to all the people who have worked on translations, too, and to Alexey Samoilov for picking up the maintenance of the Ubuntu Lime PPA.

  • Open Source Graphics App Krita Sees New Bug Fix Release

    Krita, one of the most popular open-source graphics editors available, has a new release — and it's already available to install on Ubuntu.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE PIM update now available for Zesty Zapus 17.04

    As explained in our call for testing post, we missed by a whisker getting updated PIM 16.12.3 (kontact, kmail, akregator, kgpg etc..) into Zesty for release day, and we believe it is important that our users have access to this significant update.

    Therefore packages for PIM 16.12.3 release are now available in the Kubuntu backports PPAs.

  • Crazy Awesome KDE Plasma Desktop Bluetooth Audio on openSUSE

    I often hear complains of Bluetooth on Linux and how it just doesn't work well. I scratch my head as I just don't understand the problem because I just cannot relate at all. Bluetooth in Linux has been a breeze! I don't know if it is universally this easy with KDE Plasma or the way openSUSE packages it all together but of any Bluetooth enabled device I have ever used, KDE Plasma on openSUSE does it right.

Leftovers: KDE and Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE neon CMake Package Validation

    In KDE neon‘s constant quest of raising the quality bar of KDE software and neon itself, I added a new tool to our set of quality assurance tools. CMake Package QA is meant to ensure that find_package() calls on CMake packages provided by config files (e.g. FooConfig.cmake files) do actually work.

  • Aether Icon Theme
  • Krita 2017 Survey Results

    A bit later than planned, but here are the 2017 Krita Survey results! We wanted to know a lot of things, like, what kind of hardware and screen resolution are most common, what drawing tablets were most common, and which ones gave most trouble. We had more than 1000 responses! Here’s a short summary, for the full report, head to Krita User Survey Report.

  • Cutelyst 1.6.0 released, to infinity and beyond!

    Once 1.5.0 was release I thought the next release would be a small one, it started with a bunch of bug fixes, Simon Wilper made a contribution to Utils::Sql, basically when things get out to production you find bugs, so there were tons of fixes to WSGI module.

  • LaKademy 2017 just started!

    The Latin America KDE Summit, LaKademy, just started today in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The country is in the middle of a general strike, which I’m supporting, but the LaKademy couldn’t stop. We’ve been organizing this meeting for a year.

  • KDE Connect from the eyes of a newbie... What sorcery is this?

    Of course, I inferred it was something to connect a phone and a PC in some way and enabling the swapping of files in between the two devices, but I really did not care much about it. After all, that is what bluetooth is for, right?

    Today, I decided to give it a try on PCLOS.

  • 9 months of Atelier project, almost time to launch(or not) =D
  • Nextcloud Plugin for QuickShare

    So after a long hiatus I chose the Plasma QuickShare applet (which is sort of the Plasma5 replacement for the old Pastebin Plasmoid) as my point of re-entry into KDE code work. There was after all a deal of itches there I wanted scratched. It’s been quite a bit of fun figuring out the various interesting frameworks QuickShare is connected to at the backend. Anyways, some days ago I got a rudimentary Nextcloud plugin past review and pushed it, which should mean it’ll soon be coming to a 5.10-powered desktop near you Smile

  • QNX as a desktop operating system

    On his spare time, Elad Lahav (a kernel developer at BlackBerry) built an experimental Qt-based desktop environment to try and see if he could use QNX as a desktop operating system. And it works!

  • Performance regression testing of Qt Quick

    We recently added a new toy to The Qt Project, and I wanted to give an overview on what it is and how it can be used.

  • Qt World Summit 2017 Call for Presentations
  • Give us a proper mimetype name for OpenCL C files!

    KDevelop, your cross-platform IDE, since version 5.1 has initial OpenCL language support.

Kubuntu 17.04 - the next generation

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

As usual, Kubuntu 17.04 does not give you any surprises. It is stable and reliable. It is reasonably resource-hungry. There are no wonders in this new release. Just a well-rounded distribution for everyday use.

Yes, there are small bugs or inconveniences here and there, but they are not huge and can be easily fixed, replaced or lived with. The biggest of them for me, of course, is the lack of multimedia codecs. You can heal that easily.

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KDE vs. GNOME Design Philosophies

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

The days are gone when the Linux desktop was dominated almost entirely by KDE and GNOME. However, the influence of their design philosophy remains, with KDE favored by a third of users, and many modern desktop alternatives, from GNOME itself to Linux Mint’s Cinnamon and MATE using applications originally designed for GNOME. Broadly speaking, KDE’s design philosopy can be described as completist, and designed for users of all levels of experience, while GNOME’s is minimalist, and aimed particularly at new users — although all levels of users can appreciate GNOME design as well.

By “completist,” I mean that KDE applications try to include every function that could possibly be included in a task. Confusion is limited by the setting of intelligent defaults, but more functions are still visible than most everyday uses require. Perhaps the ultimate example of this design is digiKam, which over the year has calved new windows the way that polar ice caps calve glaciers.

At the opposite end of the spectrum, GNOME applications tend to include only the features for the most common use-cases. This choice makes GNOME apps easy to use, but can leave users stranded if any problems emerge. A typical example is Simple Scan, which is so uncluttered that at first it can almost seem confusing.

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Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu!

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

Let us continue with the spring season distro testing. Next on the menu: Kubuntu. After many years of offering bland, emotionless releases, we had a cautiously reasonable Yakkety Yak edition, so me hopes are high for today.

And for today, we will examine the latest Kubuntu, which officially bears the name of Zesty Zapus, but once again, like my recent Ubuntu review, my version of the distro's name is totally better. So allow me to ask thee, what is the answer to Linux, multiverse and constant forking?

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Kirigami 2.1

Filed under
KDE
  • Kirigami 2.1 [Ed: post removed, maybe temporarily/by accident]
  • KDE Kirigami 2.1 Released To Help Build Convergent Linux Apps

    While convergence may be dead at Ubuntu/Canonical, KDE developers continue working on Plasma Mobile and their convergence vision driven in part by the Kirigami user-interface framework.

  • Kirigami 2.1 Open-Source Framework for Convergent Mobile and Desktop UIs Is Out

    KDE's Paul Brown announced the general availability of version 2.1 of the open-source Kirigami UI framework for producing convergent user interfaces for mobile and desktop environments.

    Kirigami 2.1 is here three and a half months after the launch of Kirigami 2.0 as the project's most mature version to date. Prominent features include ItemViewHeader, a standardized title for ListViews, which can be customized with a background image that uses a parallax effect when scrolled and the header is adjusted accordingly. Multiple behaviors can be set for this component.

KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • A Simple, Straightforward Clipboard Manager for GNOME

    Clipboard Manager extension for Gnome Shell is a no-frills clipboard manager for GNOME.

    It adds an indicator menu to the top panel and caches your clipboard history. There’s nothing extra; no regex searching, or cross-device, multi-sync or pan-dimensional magic. Just a simple, easy to access clipboard history.

    I’ve never been a particularly big clipboard fan. I typically only need to access whatever I copy as I copy it.

  • First GNOME 3.26 Development Release Out, Some Apps Ported to Meson Build System

    GNOME Project's Michael Catanzaro just informed us via an email announcement that the first unstable release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is out now for public testing and early adopters.

    Yes, we're talking about GNOME 3.25.1, the first development in the release cycle of GNOME 3.26, which is currently scheduled to launch later this year, on September 13. Being the first unstable release and all that, GNOME 3.25.1 doesn't ship with many changes, and you can check out the CORE NEWS and APPS NEWS for details.

  • Features To Look Forward To In Next Month's KDE Plasma 5.10

    We are just one month away from seeing the next KDE Plasma 5 desktop release.

  • User Question: With Some Free Software Phone Projects Ending, What Does Plasma Mobile's Future Look Like?

    Rosy. While it is true that Plasma Mobile used to be built on the Ubuntu Phone codebase, that was superseded some time ago. The recent events at Ubuntu and other mobile communities have not modified the pace of the development (which is pretty fast) or the end goal, which is to build frameworks that will allow convergence for all kinds of front-ends and apps on all kinds of devices.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Manjaro Linux 17.0.2 Arch-based operating system is here with GNOME, KDE, and Xfce
    Many Linux snobs push the Arch operating system as the greatest thing since sliced bread. In fact, some members of the Arch community (not all of them) can be downright mean and unpleasant to non-users. Not using Arch? Ugh. Peasant! In reality, while Arch is a fine OS (stable and fast), it can be very hard to install and set up, and quite frankly, often not worth the hassle. People have lives to live, and sometimes it is easy to forget that an operating system and associated computer are tools -- not a religion.
  • [Older] Friends, syslog-ng, Package Hub, ARM: openSUSE conference 2017
    Being a long-time openSUSE user, I visit the openSUSE conference not only to present on one of its components – syslog-ng – but also to meet friends and learn about new technologies and the plans for the upcoming year. Some talks, like those about Package Hub, were very interesting and important also from a syslog-ng perspective. Of course, I also joined a few talks for my personal interest, like the one on the new ARM devices supported by openSUSE.
  • UK Army to Use Red Hat OS, Automation Platform for Private Cloud Needs
  • Linux-ready PC/104 board runs on 6 to 7 Watts
    Win Enterprises announced a “MB-83310” PC/104 SBC with a Vortex DX3 SoC, GbE, Fast Ethernet, SATA, M.2, and a -20 to 70°C operating range.
  • [Older] The Turtlebot 3 has launched
    If you’re familiar with ROS (Robot Operating System), chances are you’re also familiar with the Turtlebot. The first version of the Turtlebot was created back in 2010 to serve as an inexpensive platform for learning ROS. This was followed in 2012 by the Turtlebot 2, which has since become the reference platform for learning ROS. We have a number of them here at Canonical, and we love them, although we have one issue with them: they’re just a tad too big. Taking them on a plane requires one to decide what one loves more, one’s belongings, or the Turtlebot, and to check the other.
  • Ubuntu ranked as 2nd most used IoT OS by Eclipse Foundation survey
  • Conjure-up dev summary: Week 25
    We recently switched over to using a bundled LXD and with that change came a few hiccups in deployments. We've been monitoring the error reports coming in and have made several fixes to improve that journey. If you are one of the ones unable to deploy spells please give this release another go and get in touch with us if you still run into problems.
  • We're looking for Ubuntu 17.10 wallpapers right now!
    Submissions will be handled via Flickr at the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase - Wallpapers group, and the submission window begins now and ends on July 3rd.
  • Atollic TrueSTUDIO, the leading commercial GNU/Eclipse IDE for ARM devices is now available for use on Linux workstations
    Atollic TrueSTUDIO IDE has rapidly become the preferred Eclipse™/GDB/GCC-based software development environment for developers working with ARM-based devices. The Linux hosting announcement is expected to widely increase the popularity of this tool.
  •  
  • Security-Focused Purism Librem 13 & 15 Linux Laptops Go Mainstream with Qubes OS
    Purism, the social purpose corporation focused on designing and manufacturing privacy-conscious hardware and software products, announced the general availability of their security-focused Purism Librem 13 and 15 laptops. Until recently, both Purism Librem 13 and Librem 15 laptops were available only as made-to-order, which means that those who wanted to purchase either model would have to order it first and then wait a few months until the device arrived. And now, the company finally managed to scale the production to hold inventory of the laptops.

Newly-Built Software for Slackware

  • What if gcc 7 gives you headaches?
    In Slackware-current we use version 7.1.0 of the gcc compiler suite. These advanced compilers can sometimes be quite a bit more strict about what they accept as valid code. As a consequence, you will regularly run into compilation issues with software. Not just the software made with the scripts on slackbuilds.org, but also some of the software in the Slackware core distribution requires patches in order to get them to compile. Until now, I have been lucky to find the patches I needed in the repositories of other distributions, or else developers patched their software themselves. But there will be corner cases where solutions and patches are not readily found, or the developers will simply not support gcc 7. Pale Moon is such a piece of software where the developers recommend compiling with gcc 4.x or as a last resort, gcc 5.
  • Plasma 5 for Slackware – June release
    Slackware64 14.2 users will have to wait another day, but I have uploaded my latest set of Plasma 5 packages for Slackware-current to the ‘ktown’ repository. KDE 5_17.06 contains: KDE Frameworks 5.35.0, Plasma 5.10.2 and Applications 17.04.2. I based this new release on Qt 5.9.0 (at least for Slackware-current… for 14.2 I will stick to Qt 5.7.1). NOTE: I will no longer be releasing Plasma 5 packages for 32bit Slackware 14.2.
  • LibreOffice 5.3.4 packages for -current
    When looking for package updates in preparation for a new Slackware Live PLASMA5 edition, I noticed that the Document Foundation had released LibreOffice 5.3.4 without updating their blog with the news – it’s only mentioned on the download page. I have built and uploaded Slackware-current packages for libreoffice-5.3.4. If you are on Slackware 14.2 you will probably have to skip this one, as I will not have time for compiling packages the coming weeks (allocates one virtual machine for one day per build, since I can only check on progress in the evenings). The package for -current needed to be (re-)built anyway because of the library issue with Slackware’s updated libGLEW which prevented Impress to start.

Tizen and More Android Leftovers

OSS: FOSS in Mappano, Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), Blender in Class, Kodi Jobs, Innersource

  • Italian municipality calls for sharing of IT solutions
    The council of Mappano (Italy) is calling for public administrations to share their IT solutions. The Mappano municipality is starting from scratch, and the new council has decided to build its IT infrastructure, and offer its eGovernment services, using free and open source software.
  • Windstream joins Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) project to accelerate adoption of open standards for SDN/NFV automation
  • Locks in the classroom – 2017
    For the fifth year now, our grade nine students have been doing 3D modeling using Blender. Our students finished up their first assignments over a month ago, but it’s taken this long for me to get the top models together. So, with no further delay, here are the top models from each of the three grade nine classes (click on the pictures for Full HD renders).
  • Set the WABAC to 1984: Henry Spencer getopt, and the roots of open source
    I excavated a bit of hacker history from old memories today. Not dead history either, but an important beginning of some large good things. Here’s how it happened. I got email from a person requesting me to identify a source for the following allegedly famous quote: “All operating systems eventually turn into Unix
  • Traveling “Kodi Repair Men” Are Apparently a Thing Now

    With all the chaos and upheaval in the Kodi addon scene recently, many 'pirate' devices have stopped performing as they did before. This is a problem for the thousands of people who bought their devices ready configured, since they have no idea how they work. Enter the traveling 'Kodi repair men,' who will fix your box in the pub or even your own home.

  • [Older] Does Valve really own Dota? A jury will decide
    The case could also take an interesting open source-based turn thanks to a September 23, 2004 forum post that could be seen as Eul giving up his claim on any rights to Dota. "From this point forward, Dota is now open source," he wrote. "Whoever wishes to release a version of Dota may without my consent, I just ask for a nod in the credits to your map." This post "might mean that anyone had permission to build their own versions of Dota on any platform—and to sell their versions of Eul’s creation," as Breyer puts it. Or it might simply mean that Eul was just granting a "limited license" intended for other mod-makers, not for standalone games based on Dota.
  • Innersource: A Guide to the What, Why, and How
    In a nutshell, ‘innersource’ refers to bringing the core principles of open source and community collaboration within the walls of an organization. This involves building an internal community, collaborative engineering workflow, and culture.
  • PDP-8/e Replicated — Introduction
    I am creating a replica of the DEC PDP-8/e architecture in an FPGA from schematics of the original hardware. So how did I end up with a project like this? The story begins with me wanting to have a computer with one of those front panels that have many, many lights where you can really see, in real time, what the computer is doing while it is executing code. Not because I am nostalgic for a prior experience with any of those — I was born a bit too late for that and my first computer as a kid was a Commodore 64.
  • [Older] PyCon Pune 2017
  • [Older] My lightning talk in Django Girls PyCon
    In the weekend before PyCon US, we had a Django Girls PyCon workshop in Portland on 12th-13th May. On 12th there were a few lightning talks, and installation before the actual workshop started on 13th.
  • Dreams don’t cost a penny, mumma’s boy :)
    In the dream, I am going to a Debconf, get bursary and the conference is being held somewhere in Europe, maybe Paris...
  • First Round Talks of Fedora + GNOME at UPN
    Today our local group has traveled many miles to the north of Lima to present our lately work by using Fedora and GNOME as users and developers. Thanks to the organizers of the IT Forum to invite us and support our job as Linux volunteers and very nice potential contributors to GNOME and Fedora and the group we have formed.