Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

KDE: Krita Interview with Autumn Lansing, Deprecation of Qbs, and KDE in FreeBSD

Filed under
KDE
  • Krita Interview with Autumn Lansing

    I’m a comics artist and web developer from Oklahoma City. I’ve been creating comics and artwork for most of my life, though I didn’t seriously start making comics until several years ago. I’ve also worked variously as a writer, editor, layout artist, concert promoter, and art gallery director, among other things.

  • Deprecation of Qbs

    The Qt Company has been supporting three different build systems for Qt programs. For Qt users, qmake is currently the most widely used build system. CMake is a clear second and growing in popularity. The third place is Qbs, with significantly smaller adoption. When asked about their preferences, most of our customers said they plan to use either CMake or qmake in the future.

    We have decided to deprecate Qbs and redirect our resources to increase support for CMake. Qbs will remain supported until the end of 2019 with the last planned release in April 2019, together with Qt Creator 4.9. Qbs is available under both commercial and open-source licenses, and we are happy to continue providing the infrastructure for further development by the Qt Project community.

  • The Qt Company Decides To Deprecate The Qbs Build System, Will Focus On CMake & QMake

    While Qt's Qbs build system was once planned as the default build system for Qt6 and shaping up to be the de facto successor to QMake, there is a change of course with The Qt Company now announcing they are deprecating this custom build system.

    In recent months Qbs for Qt 6 began looking less certain and now The Qt Company has announced they are going to deprecate Qbs. From talking with their customers, they decided to focus on QMake and CMake.

  • October? [Ed: Adriaan de Groot reports KDE progress in FreeBSD]

    FreeBSD ports contain Qt 5.11.2 (except for WebEngine), KDE Frameworks 5.51, KDE Plasma 5.12.7 (LTS, but there’s movement lower in the graphics stack that should allow us to update to the current feature release soon-ish), and Applications 18.08. I just updated deskutils/latte-dock to the latest 0.8.2 release. Tobias has been doing everything, updating stuff all over.

    There are also things going away from FreeBSD ports. I’ll repeat for the hard-of-understanding: KDE4 ports are being removed on december 31st, 2018. We’ve notified those maintainers that we can — people using BitBounce deserve a special place and haven’t been informed, although we tried. New is that Qt4 ports are deprecated on FreeBSD and scheduled for removal on march 31st, 2019 (three months after KDE4, the main consumer, is removed). This is a bigger deprecation step, actually, since it touches applications maintained outside of kde@. The issue is simple though: Qt4 went EOL in 2015 and maintainence is increasing (e.g. for OpenSSL 1.1.1, changing C++ compilers, etc.). We have started updating default flavors (for things that have both) and informing maintainers.

Plasma 5.14.2, Applications 18.08.2 and Frameworks 5.51.0 by KDE now available to all Chakra users

Filed under
KDE

On your next system upgrade you will receive all the latest versions of KDE’s Plasma , Applications and Frameworks , in addition to the usual package updates. All these have been compiled against the latest Qt 5.11.2.

We make available Plasma 5.14 in its second bug-fix release, a brand new series that introduces many new features to our favorite desktop environment.

Read more

Latte bug fix release v0.8.2

Filed under
KDE

Version 0.8.2 contains two very important bug fixes for multi-screen environments. The new multi-screen approach from v0.8.1 helped me to track with a user a very annoying bug that could be present from v0.6.x era. During startup under multi-screen environments there were some rare cases that docks in explicit screens were not positioned correctly. More specific the docks were appearing in the middle of the screen or at a wrong screen rather than the appropriate screen and edge choice. The second important multi-screen bug that was fixed is that when the user was unplugging very often its external screens the associated docks were not loaded automatically when he was re-attaching that screens. So as you see v0.8.2 is a very important milestone for multi-screen environments and as such I advice you to update in case you are using multi screens.

Read more

digiKam 6.0.0 beta 2 is released

Filed under
KDE

Since a very long time, digiKam users would like to be able to manage videos just like photos. The digital camera world adds video support in all devices, with plenty of formats. The challenge to deal with these video media is to extract all the main metadata and populate the database. The Exiv2 shared library used in background by digiKam has video support which has never been finalized and the implementation is still unstable. Enabling video metadata support with Exiv2 would crash digiKam quickly in production.

So we have been forced to find an alternative to Exiv2 for video support. In release 5.5.0 we started to use the QtAV framework to play video media in digiKam. We chose QtAV because this framework directly uses ffmpeg codecs which de facto supports all formats very well. In contrast, the QtMultimedia framework requires extra platform codecs that end users need to install explicitly to obtain functional video support. We don’t want to force digiKam users to install extra programs for that. This must work automatically when digiKam is installed. digiKam must work as simple way to deal with video, as for photo.

Read more

KDE in Asia and Latin America

Filed under
KDE
  • KDAB at Embedded Technology, Japan

    KDAB is proud to announce that for the first time ever we will be present at Embedded Technology outside of Tokyo in Japan.

    Every year more than 25000 visitors attend over 3 days!

    The event takes place in the Pacifico Yokohama exhibition center and focuses on Embedded AI, IoT Wireless Technology, Smart Sensing and Safety & Security.

    KDAB will present Automotive and Industrial customers’ showcases and tools around Modern C++, Qt and 3D.

  • LaKademy 2018 Celebrates 22 Years of KDE

    LaKademy, or Latin American Akademy, is the annual meeting of the Latin American KDE community - one of the biggest Free software communities in the world. The event takes place since 2012, and is open to all developers, artists, users, and everyone who wants to contribute in any way to the software created or maintained by the community.

Qt Design Studio 1.0 Released

Filed under
Development
KDE

Qt Design Studio is a UI design and development environment that enables designers and developers to rapidly prototype and develop complex and scalable UIs.

Qt Design Studio is a tool used by both designers and developers and that makes collaboration between the two a lot simpler and more streamlined: Designers can look the graphical view, while developers can look at the QML code. With this workflow, designers can have their Photoshop designs running on real devices in minutes! As an aside, I say Photoshop designs, but we are planning to support other graphic design tools in the future.

Read more

Also: Qt Design Studio 1.0 Released As New Design/Development Environment

Pine64, maker of cheap Linux laptops, may be making a cheap Linux phone

Filed under
KDE

You might remember Pine64 as the manufacturer and retailer behind the Pinebook, a US $99 Linux-based laptop. The company is planning to continue its journey into the world of budget-tier Linux mobile devices by working on a smartphone, dubbed the PinePhone.

Like the cheap laptops Pine sells, the PinePhone isn’t likely to be a specs monster. According to the Pine team, they’re planning on basing the PinePhone around their Pine A64 single-board computer. That means the PinePhone is likely to have a mere 2 GB of RAM and a quad-core ARM Cortex A53 SoC. The phone will also likely only have 16 GB of onboard storage.

Most of the details are still up in the air, especially concerning the final design. However, Pine64 is planning on releasing a dev kit for the phone on November 1. This will include the Pine A64 baseboard, an SOPine module, a 7-inch touchscreen, a camera, a WiFi/Bluetooth card, a battery case, and an LTE Cat4 USB dongle. The final device may use a 5.45” 1440x720 display, but since the design isn’t planned on being final until mid-2019, this could change.

Read more

Qt Code of Conduct and KDE Bug Day

Filed under
KDE

Slimbook & Kubuntu - Combat Report 1

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

It has been a few weeks since I purchased my lovely Slimbook Pro2 and installed Kubuntu 18.04 on it. A few weeks during which I put the laptop and its operating system through a series of real-life usage tests, just as I've promised. I do use Linux in my production setup, but only sparingly, mostly because the domains of gaming and writing are not as good as on the Windows side of things.

This attempt is a no-nonsense approach to using Linux fully and completely for serious tasks, without any glamor and fanboyism. While Linux has always served me superbly in the data center space, on the desktop and in the office, it's always taken a second place to Windows. Well, Slimbook + Kubuntu might shatter my preconceptions and exceed my expectations. Might. Also, henceforth, I shall call my machine Slimbuntu. Or not. Anyway, after me.

Read more

Also: Plasma 5.14.2 available in Cosmic backports PPA

Solus Readies KDE Plasma Edition Testing ISO with Latest KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop

Filed under
OS
KDE

After giving us the feature-rich and luxurious Budgie desktop, as well as dedicated editions with the GNOME and MATE desktop environments, the Solus Project now readies the Solus Plasma Edition, a special edition featuring the latest KDE Plasma desktop environment and related technologies.

An ISO image for the Solus Plasma Edition is now available for public testing, which you can download here, featuring the recently released KDE Plasma 5.14 desktop environment, along with the KDE Applications 18.08.2 and KDE Frameworks 5.51 open-source software suites, all built against the Qt 5.11.2 open-source software development framework.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • #RecruitmentFocus: Open source skills in high demand
    The unemployment rate in South Africa rose to 27.5% in the third quarter of 2018, while the demand for skills remains high - leaving an industry conundrum that is yet to be solved. According to SUSE, partnerships that focus on upskilling graduates and providing real-work skills, as well as placement opportunities - could be exactly what the industry in looking for.
  • Stable: not moving vs. not breaking
    There are two terms that brings a heavy controversy in the Open Source world: support and stable. Both of them have their roots in the “old days” of Open Source, where its commercial impact was low and very few companies made business with it. You probably have read a lot about maintenance vs support. This controversy is older. I first heard of it in the context of Linux based distributions. Commercial distribution had to put effort in differentiating among the two because in Open SOurce they were used indistictly but not in business. But this post is about the adjectivet stable…
  • Cameron Kaiser: A thank you to Ginn Chen, whom Larry Ellison screwed
    Periodically I refresh my machines by dusting them off and plugging them in and running them for a while to keep the disks spinnin' and the caps chargin'. Today was the day to refurbish my Sun Ultra-3, the only laptop Sun ever "made" (they actually rebadged the SPARCle and later the crotchburner 1.2GHz Tadpole Viper, which is the one I have). Since its last refresh the IDPROM had died, as they do when they run out of battery, resetting the MAC address to zeroes and erasing the license for the 802.11b which I never used anyway. But, after fixing the clock to prevent GNOME from puking on the abnormal date, it booted and I figured I'd update Firefox since it still had 38.4 on it. Ginn Chen, first at Sun and later at Oracle, regularly issued builds of Firefox which ran very nicely on SPARC Solaris 10. Near as I can determine, Oracle has never offered a build of any Firefox post-Rust even to the paying customers they're bleeding dry, but I figured I should be able to find the last ESR of 52 and install that. (Amusingly this relic can run a Firefox in some respects more current than TenFourFox, which is an evolved and patched Firefox 45.)
  • Protecting the world’s oceans with open data science
    For environmental scientists, researching a single ecosystem or organism can be a daunting task. The amount of data and literature to comb through (or create) is often overwhelming. So how, then, can environmental scientists approach studying the health of the world’s oceans? What ocean health means is a big question in itself—oceans span millions of square miles, are home to countless species, and border hundreds of countries and territories, each of which has its own unique marine policies and practices. But no matter how daunting this task may seem, it’s a necessary and vital one. So in 2012, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and Conservation International publicly launched the Ocean Health Index (OHI), an ambitious initiative to measure the benefits that oceans provide to people, including clean water, coastal protections, and biodiversity. The idea was to create an annual assessment to document major oceanic changes and trends, and in turn, use those findings to craft better marine policy around the world.

Openwashing Leftovers

The Last Independent Mobile OS

The year was 2010 and the future of mobile computing was looking bright. The iPhone was barely three years old, Google’s Android had yet to swallow the smartphone market whole, and half a dozen alternative mobile operating systems—many of which were devoutly open source—were preparing for launch. Eight years on, you probably haven’t even heard of most of these alternative mobile operating systems, much less use them. Today, Android and iOS dominate the global smartphone market and account for 99.9 percent of mobile operating systems. Even Microsoft and Blackberry, longtime players in the mobile space with massive revenue streams, have all but left the space. Then there’s Jolla, the small Finnish tech company behind Sailfish OS, which it bills as the “last independent alternative mobile operating system.” Jolla has had to walk itself back from the edge of destruction several times over the course of its seven year existence, and each time it has emerged battered, but more determined than ever to carve out a spot in the world for a truly independent, open source mobile operating system. After years of failed product launches, lackluster user growth, and supply chain fiascoes, it’s only been in the last few months that things finally seem to be turning to Jolla’s favor. Over the past two years the company has rode the wave of anti-Google sentiment outside the US and inked deals with large foreign companies that want to turn Sailfish into a household name. Despite the recent success, Jolla is far from being a major player in the mobile market. And yet it also still exists, which is more than can be said of every other would-be alternative mobile OS company. Read more