Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

Krita 4.0.1 Released

Filed under
KDE

Today the Krita team releases Krita 4.0.1, a bug fix release of Krita 4.0.0. We fixed more than fifty bugs since the Krita 4.0.0 release! See below for the full list of fixed isses. Translations work again with the appimage and the macOS build.

Read more

Falkon browser - Fly babe fly

Filed under
KDE
Software
Reviews
Web

Falkon and QupZilla may be the same product, but just re-branding it has already improved the overall impression. Not by a huge margin, but enough to make it interesting. Once you start using it, you do realize that it's a mix of good and odd, much like the predecessor, with some really brilliant and dubious choices packaged together. Adblocking, session manager versus fuzzy interface, missing spellcheck and database plaintext thingie. Then, the behavior is nowhere near as stellar, lithe or fast as it should be.

Still, this has been my most successful QupZilla-ed experience so far. Falkon was stable, it did not crash, there were no errors, and overall, it worked well. But the sense of unease remains. I can't put my finger to it, but there's just something slightly out of place with it. Not sure what it is. But whatever it is, it's probably the reason why there hasn't been that much uptake with this native KDE Internet-giving program. Once that part is sorted out, Plasma may have a nice and friendly browser. Worth testing, and try not to be dissuaded by the oddness.

Read more

KDE and GNOME: Offline Vaults, AtCore, KDE Connect and Nautilus

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Offline Vaults for an extra layer of protection

    I’m slowly returning to KDE development after a few months of being mostly in bugfix mode due to my other-life obligations (more on that later), so I decided to implement a new feature for my youngest project – the Plasma Vault.

    One of the possible attack vectors to your Plasma Vaults is that people could potentially have access to your computer while the vault is open.

    This is not a problem if we consider direct access because it is something that is easily controlled – you see everyone who approaches your computer, but the problem can be remote access.

  • [AtCore] April progress update

    It has been over a month since my last progress update. Here is what I’ve done.

  • KDE Connect desktop 1.3 released
  • KDE Connect 1.3 Gets An Extension For GNOME's Nautilus

    KDE Connect is the nifty KDE project providing allowing communication between your Linux desktop computer and your Android smartphone/tablet via a secure communication protocol. KDE Connect 1.3 is now the latest feature release.

    KDE Connect already allows functionality like viewing/replying to messages from your desktop, sending browser links to your phone, and other data synchronization abilities. With GNOME not having any compelling alternative to KDE Connect, today's v1.3 release adds in a Nautilus extension that allows users to send files to their phone from the GNOME file manager's context menu.

  • Proposal to add an Action-Info Bar to Nautilus

    We are looking into adding an action & info bar to Nautilus. The background about this proposal can be read on the task where we put the main goals, prior art, different proposals and mockups, etc.

    We are not sure whether this is the appropriate solution and whether the implementation we propose is ideal. In order to be more confident, we would like to gather early feedback on the current proposal. Also, we are looking for ideas on how to improve the overall approach.

    The current proposal is being worked in a branch and can be installed via Flatpak clicking here (Note: You might need to install it the the CLI by executing `flatpak install nautilus-dev.flatpak` due to a bug in Software).

Tumbleweed/KDE and GNOME/GTK

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Tumbleweed Starts Week with Plasma, DigiKam Updates
  • Community Data Analytics: Now in Technicolor!

    So let's revisit our "whole year 2017 for all of KDEPIM" (that is the parts in KDE Applications, in Extragear and in Playground) with more colors!

    Firstly, this gives us the weekly activity using the "Magma" palette and a linear interpolation of the colors between the minimum and maximum commit counts...

    [...]

    This time we don't even need to zoom in to spot the code KDEPIM contributors in 2017. With the color coding, we see right away again that Laurent Montel, Daniel Vratil and Volker Krause are the core contributors. It's much less guess work than the last time, we're backed by the color coded centrality metric now. We can also better see that Allen Winter, Sandro Knauß and David Faure are very central too, something that we missed the last time.

  • Canta Is An Amazing Material Design GTK Theme

    Canta is a complete Material Design theme. It uses pastel colors in a beautiful blend, with round buttons, tabs, and corners. Subtle, unobtrusive transparency is used sporadically, giving Canta a stylish look.

A Preview to Kubuntu 18.04 from the Beta 2

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Kubuntu 18.04 Beta 2 is here! It arrived today at Friday, April 6, 2018 in an announcement from Steve Langasek on Ubuntu Announce mailing list. Here's the summary after I installed it freshly on my laptop: the memory usage is only about 370MiB when idle, new dark themes, new wallpaper, new applications (Firefox 59, LibreOffice 6.0, KDE Applications 17.12.3), Muon is here again along with Plasma Discover (both are software center). This will be a good news for every Kubuntu user who is waiting for the latest LTS version of Kubuntu.

Read more

Also: Kubuntu Bionic Beaver (18.04 LTS) Beta 2 Released!

Getting Started with Linux Mint? Focus on These Three Tools

KDE Ships Release Candidate of KDE Applications 18.04

Filed under
KDE

April 6, 2018. Today KDE released the release candidate of the new versions of KDE Applications. With dependency and feature freezes in place, the KDE team's focus is now on fixing bugs and further polishing.

Check the community release notes for information on tarballs and known issues. A more complete announcement will be available for the final release

The KDE Applications 18.04 releases need a thorough testing in order to maintain and improve the quality and user experience. Actual users are critical to maintaining high KDE quality, because developers simply cannot test every possible configuration. We're counting on you to help find bugs early so they can be squashed before the final release. Please consider joining the team by installing the release candidate and reporting any bugs.

Read more

Also: KDE Applications 18.04 Release Candidate Arrives

KDE: KDE Connect, qbittorrent, Kraft 0.80

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Connect – Tips, Tricks and Misconceptions

    Since my first blog post we got an huge amount of feedback and it’s amazing to see that you are as excited about KDE Connect as we are. This way I want to say “Thank you” for all your kind words and tell you that this kind of positive feedback is what keeps us going.

    I would also like to share some tips and tricks about KDE Connect that you might not know yet, but first I would like to clear up a common misconception.

  • [Slackware] New package for qbittorrent, now based on Qt5

    Not related per se to the fall-out of last weekend’s update to the icu4c and poppler packages, my qbittorrent package for slackware-current had stopped working sometime ago – caused by an update in -current of the boost package on which the torrent library depends.

    I needed to update qbittorrent too therefore, after having taken care of the icu4c/poppler breakage. The thing is, I had tried to delay the switch in qbittorrent from Qt4 to Qt5 for as long as possible. The ‘new’ 4.x series of qbittorrent have a hard dependency on Qt5, and Qt4 is no longer supported. So I bit the bullet and made packages for bittorrent-4.0.4 and its dependency, libtorrent-rasterbar-1.1.6.
    Since the program uses Qt5 now, the dependencies have changed. If you were running qbittorrent 3.x on slackware-current previously then you have to ensure that you have libxkbcommon, qt5 and qt5-webkit packages installed now.

  • Kraft Version 0.80 Released

    I am happy to announce the release of the stable Kraft version 0.80 (Changelog).

    Kraft is desktop software to manage documents like quotes and invoices in the small business. It focuses on ease of use through an intuitive GUI, a well choosen feature set and ensures privacy by keeping data local.

    After more than a dozen years of life time, Kraft is now reaching a new level: It is now completely ported to Qt5 / KDE Frameworks 5 and with that, it is compatible with all modern Linux distributions again.

    KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt5 are the best base for modern desktop software and Kraft integrates seamlessly into all Linux desktops. Kraft makes use of the great KDE PIM infrastructure with KAddressbook and Akonadi.

Cutelyst 2.1 Released

Filed under
Development
KDE

Cutelyst a Qt/C++ Web Framework got upped to 2.1. Yesterday I found a bug that although not critical it’s important enough to roll out a new release.

As a new feature we have LangSelect plugin to help with auto detection of user language (Matthias).

Read more

Also: New in Qt 5.11: quick text selection in QLineEdit

KDE: Latte Dock, Krita, KDE FreeBSD

Filed under
KDE
  • Latte Dock 0.7.79 Released With Wayland Improvements, New Features

    For fans of Latte Dock, the KDE Plasma aligned desktop "dock", is out with a big development release ahead of the Latte Dock 0.8 release that will be coming up soon.

  • [Krita] Interview with Christopher

    A friend of mine back East who is really into Open Source does digital painting from time to time. He knew I was dissatisfied with Painter X and CS so he recommended Krita. Painter wasn’t particularly intuitive and CS, while OK, I wanted something different. Just because something is popular doesn’t mean it’s the right fit for everyone. So then I asked him where I could get Krita. He said to me “Open Source. Just download it. From their site”. I was like “it couldn’t be that simple”. But it was. I installed it and I was hooked.

  • CMake 3.11 (P)reparations

    CMake 3.11 is here — it went through four rc’s — which means that preparatory work is underway in KDE FreeBSD land (and has been since -rc1). KDE, as the main early consumer of CMake, is the package maintainer on FreeBSD. That means that it falls to us to signal things that break due to CMake updates, and often to fix them as well. Generally the KDE ports (even the KDE4-era onces) are not a problem; modern-ish CMake was basically develop-tested in KDE. Sometimes updates in C++ bite us — recent FreeBSD releases keep updating Clang, which keeps getting more picky about C++ code (and may default to newer C++ standards than expected). But generally, KDE stuff is ok.

    To test a CMake update, I build about 2000 packages on my own desktop workstation. It takes about 20 hours with all the supporting libraries and other bits — rebuilding Qt Webengine, three WebKits, five llvm’s and gcc6 kinda takes its time. Then there’s maybe two dozen packages that don’t build, and it comes down to figuring out whether they don’t build because of a change in CMake, or a change in something else, or simply because they’re already broken. But it means I end up diving into all kinds of codebases, for instance:

Latte Dock v0.7.79 - a step before the last turn...

Filed under
KDE
Software

Hello everyone Latte Dock v0.7.79 may be the last version before a beta release scheduled for the next month. This is a call for testers and enthusiasts to play with that version and try to find bugs or inconveniences that can be improved. Latte v0.8 is going to be a huge release (scheduled for June 2018) and one of its main goals is to make the user feel with it very natural and comfortable.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Debian XU4 images updated
    I've updated my Debian images for the ODROID XU4; the newest build was done before stretch release, and a lot of minor adjustments have happened since then.
  • Parrot 4.0 Ethical Hacking Linux Distro Released
  • FBI says Russians hacked [sic] hundreds of thousands of home and office routers

    The warning followed a court order Wednesday that allowed the FBI to seize a website that the hackers [sic] planned to use to give instructions to the routers. Though that cut off malicious communications, it still left the routers infected, and Friday’s warning was aimed at cleaning up those machines.

  • FBI tells router users to reboot now to kill malware infecting 500k devices

    Researchers from Cisco’s Talos security team first disclosed the existence of the malware on Wednesday. The detailed report said the malware infected more than 500,000 devices made by Linksys, Mikrotik, Netgear, QNAP, and TP-Link. Known as VPNFilter, the malware allowed attackers to collect communications, launch attacks on others, and permanently destroy the devices with a single command. The report said the malware was developed by hackers [sic] working for an advanced nation, possibly Russia, and advised users of affected router models to perform a factory reset, or at a minimum to reboot.

Software and Games: KStars, Opera, OpenStack, MariaDB and More

  • KStars 2.9.6 is Released!
    I'm glad to announce the release of KStars 2.9.6 for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. This is a minor bugfix release.
  • Opera 54 Browser Enters Beta with News on the Speed Dial, Update & Recovery Menu
    Opera has promoted its upcoming Opera 54 web browser to the beta channel, giving us a glimpse of what to expect from the final version, due for release sometime next month. Based on the open-source Chromium 67.0.3396.18 web browser, Opera 54 recently entered beta stages of development with a plethora of new features and improvements, among which we can mention a new Update & Recovery Opera menu page that makes it easier for users to update the web browser and reset it to its default state, including the ability to clear temporary data, such as cookies.
  • OpenStack at a Crossroads
    The OpenStack of a few years ago is dead, however. What has emerged from the hype cycle is a materially different foundation, mission and software stack, with a great deal of change still ahead of it.
  • The OpenStack Foundation grows beyond OpenStack
    The OpenStack Foundation has made a considerable change to its development process and governance structure by introducing two open source projects that are not part of the OpenStack cloud platform. This week, the organization launched version 1.0 of Kata Containers - a runtime system with an emphasis on speed and security, enabling users to boot a VM in as little as five seconds - and introduced a brand new project called Zuul, spinning out the software development and integration platform that has been used by the OpenStack community internally since 2012.
  • Oracle nemesis MariaDB tries to lure enterprise folk with TX 3.0
    Open-source database biz MariaDB has upped the ante in its war against Oracle, promising enterprise customers better compatibility with – and easier migration from – Big Red. The Finnish firm's latest offering, MariaDB TX 3.0, released for GA today, extends the number of use cases to include temporal processing and advanced data protection for sensitive and personally identifiable information, as well as Oracle compatibility. The broad aim is to tap into customers' grumbles over legacy vendor lock-in, while convincing the bigger customers that they can move to an open-source database without compromising performance.
  • The Humble Monthly Bundle just added two great Linux games
    For those that are interested, you can secure a copy of two great Linux games in the current Humble Monthly Bundle. Just added today are: Get Cook, Serve, Delicious! 2!! Ken Follett's The Pillars of the Earth
  • SC-Controller 0.4.3 Released, Support Steam Controller & Sony DS4 Over Bluetooth
    For those looking to manage your Steam Controller and other supported Linux gaming peripheral input devices outside of Steam, there is a new release of the independently-developed SC-Controller Linux user-space software. While Linux 4.18 is bringing the Steam Controller kernel driver, for those looking for a Steam Controller solution right now to enjoy this excellent gaming controller for now outside of Steam, SC-Controller fills that void.

Huawei, Fuchsia and More

  • Huawei will no longer allow bootloader unlocking (Update: Explanation from Huawei)

    "In order to deliver the best user experience and prevent users from experiencing possible issues that could arise from ROM flashing, including system failure, stuttering, worsened battery performance, and risk of data being compromised, Huawei will cease providing bootloader unlock codes for devices launched after May 25, 2018. [...]"

  • Fuchsia Friday: How ad targeting might be a hidden cost of Fuchsia’s structure
     

    Fuchsia, by its nature, comes with the potential for a handful of new opportunities for ad targeting. Let’s peer into the dark side of Fuchsia’s innovative features.

  • iPhone Quarter, ZTE Troubles, Facebook Troubles, Nokia Come-back
     

    So the past month or two? The Quarterly results cycle came in. The item often of great interest is the Apple iPhone performance. 52.2 million iPhones shipped and that gives roughly a flat market share compared to the year before, so about 14%-15%. I'll come and do the full math later of the quarterly data. That race is no longer in any way interesting.

    But two Top 10 smartphone brands ARE in the news. One who is facing imminent death and the other who is making a miraculous return-from-dead. So imminent death and current Top 10 brand first. ZTE. The Trump administration has put a massive squeeze on ZTE and the company is in serious trouble of imminent collapse. Then bizarrely, Trump reversed course and felt he needed to protect CHINESE employment (???) and after yet another typical Trump-mess, we now are at a Never-Neverland where Trump's own party Republicans are revolting against their President and well, ZTE may end up a casualty of this mess. We'll keep an eye on it.

  •