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KDE

Kdenlive 16.12.2 released

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KDE

The second maintenance release of the 16.12 series is out, part of KDE Applications 16.12.2.

This release fixes startup crashes with some graphic cards, as well as some fixes to MOVIT (GPU effect processing) and minor stability issues. The Appimage version as well as our PPA’s were updated, check our download section for instructions. An updated Windows version will be released in the next days. This is a relatively small update since all our efforts are currently focused on the timeline refactoring branch which will bring professional grade new features and more stability. Stay tuned for more news!

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Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • KDE Neon to Support Snap Apps in Plasma Discover

    Ubuntu-based KDE Neon is one the Linux distros we’re most excited for this year — and with good reason. The distro combines the stability of Ubuntu’s latest LTS foundations with the latest (and, if you want it, bleeding edge) KDE applications and Plasma desktop releases.

  • Adoption of Flatpak vs Snap

    Given these results alone, I’m quite frankly pretty puzzled how the jury could still be out and that’s completely ignoring the centralized nature of Snap. Distributing AppImages via Steam makes more sense than Snap (Steam has the same centralized nature as Snap). Not only does every somewhat mainstream distribution ship Steam in some non-free repo, it would also allow us to distribute applications to Windows and macOS.

  • The State Of Flatpak vs. Snaps On Various Linux Distributions

    Motivated by KDE Plasma Leaning Towards Focusing On Flatpak Over AppImage/Snaps and this lengthy, contentious forum thread, a KDE contributor has taken a closer look at the Flatpak versus Snaps versions available in different Linux distributions.

    KDE contributor Markus Slopianka sought to clarify the adoption of Flatpak vs. Snap in modern Linux distributions. He looked at the state of Snap and Flatpak in the releases of Arch, Debian, Fedora, Gentoo, Mageia, openSUSE, and Ubuntu.

Beautiful New Design on kde.org

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KDE

While in KDE we pride ourselves on making beautiful software our website has lagged behind modern requirements and trends. Visual Design Group member Ken Vermette has quietly worked away with key stakeholders to create a design and update the content. The new site uses correct HTML5 and is responsive to working on mobiles and tablets. It includes an introduction to our products, community and how you can get involved.

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KDE Applications 16.12.2 Rolls Out for Plasma Users to Fix over 20 Recorded Bugs

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KDE
Security

Today, February 9, 2017, KDE has had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of the second point release of its KDE Applications 16.12 software suite for KDE Plasma desktops.

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KDE and New Software

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KDE
Software
  • Finally, a Linux laptop worthy of KDE

    These are Macbook Air-like machines that are (as the name would imply) slim, light, and modern. The weight of Slimbook with an installed 120GB SSD, and 4GB of RAM, comes in at 1.39 kg (3.06 pounds). Considering my Chromebook Pixel 2 weighs in at 3.4 pounds, I would happily accept that encumbrance.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9.1 – Here is the First Bugfix Release

    Today, the Kde team announced the first minor release for Kde Plasma 5.9 including various little but important bugfixes and translation updates. Certainly, this first small bugfix release will improve the stability and usability of the desktop environment.

  • Desktop Dimmer – an Open-Source Screen Dimmer App

    If you regularly work in a dark room, and find your dimmed screen is still too bright, you may want to this open-source screen dimmer app a try.

  • Kupfer Quick Launcher Ported To Python 3 And GTK 3, Sees New Release After 4 And A Half Years [PPA]

    After around 4 and a half years of inactivity, a new Kupfer (quick launcher) version was released 3 days ago, followed by 3 more releases since then.

    The application has a new developer who ported the application to Python 3, GTK 3 and GObject Introspection, while also fixing various bugs.

KDE Plasma Leaning Towards Focusing On Flatpak Over AppImage/Snaps

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KDE
  • KDE Plasma Leaning Towards Focusing On Flatpak Over AppImage/Snaps

    Veteran KDE developer Sebastian Kügler has written a blog post following the Plasma Sprint that just happened recently in Stuttgart. A few interesting details were shared.

    While right now we've seen some KDE efforts around Flatpak (formerly XDG-App) and Snaps along with some in the AppImage space, KDE developers are looking to center their efforts around one next-gen packaging solution moving forward. With focusing around one app bundling solution, they hope to be able to deliver their software to more end-users directly across the distribution spectrum.

  • Plasma Meeting: Web, browsers and app bundles

    This year’s Plasma Sprint is kindly being hosted by von Affenfels, a software company in Stuttgart, Germany, focusing on mobile apps. Let me try to give you an idea of what we’re working on this week.

KDE Plasma 5.9 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, over 60 Bugs Fixed

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KDE

A few moments ago, the KDE project announced the general availability of the first point release of the KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

That's right, we're talking about KDE Plasma 5.9.1, the first bugfix release to the latest stable series of the acclaimed and modern desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions. This maintenance update comes only one week after the launch of KDE Plasma 5.9, and it fixes a total of 62 issues discovered or reported by users since then.

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Direct: KDE Plasma 5.9.1, Bugfix Release

Native look and feel

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KDE

We know that many Qt users want controls styled with a native look-and-feel. But offering that on platforms with no public styling API, is hard. A classic approach is to take snapshots of the native controls, tweak them, and use them as foreground or background in our own controls. Which is somewhat OK for static appearances. But when animations and transitions are involved, static pixmaps will only take you half the way. And since an OS can change style from one update to the next, taking snapshots runtime is risky. Using pre-grabbed snapshots is also something we don’t do because of legal considerations.

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KDE/Qt: PDF Module, Vaults, KDE Store

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KDE
  • New QtLabs PDF module

    A couple of years ago during a hackathon, a couple of us wrote a Qt wrapper around PDFium, the open-source PDF rendering engine which is used for viewing PDFs in Chromium. There have been a few fixes and improvements since then. Now we (finally) have made this module available under the LGPLv3 license.

  • Vaults - Encryption in Plasma

    Five years ago (I’m completely shocked how the time flies), we were working on Plasma Active, and one of the ideas was to allow the user to create private activities in which all the data would be encrypted.

    Now, while the idea itself was solid, there were big problems with its realization. There was no way to force applications to separate the configuration and other data based on whether the user is in the encrypted activity or not. Especially since the same application can run in multiple activities.

  • KDE Applications in Ubuntu Snap Store

    Following the recent addition of easy DBus service snapping in the snap binary bundle format, I am happy to say that we now have some of our KDE Applications in the Ubuntu 16.04 Snap Store.

  • Simple Menu launcher on KDE Store

    Quite a while ago already I wrote a launcher menu widget named Simple Menu. It's using the same backend I wrote for our bundled launchers, and it's a little bit like Application Dashboard scaled down into a small floating window, plus nifty horizontal pagination. It's also really simple and fast.

  • Chrome for iOS goes open source, a KDE-branded laptop, and more open source news

KDE Plasma 5.9, Wine 2.0, and PulseAudio 10 Hit openSUSE Tumbleweed's Repos

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KDE

The time has come for users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system to update their systems as openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio informed the community today, February 2, 2017, about the availability of multiple updated packages.

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Detailed change log for deepin 15.4 RC

deepin is a Linux distribution devoted to providing beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users. After public test of deepin 15.4 Beta, we have received a lot of suggestions and feedback, we adopted part of them and fixed a lot of problems. Read more

GNOME 3.24: New Linux desktop is fast, responsive

I’ve been a fan of the work of the GNOME team for quite some time. They put together one heck of an excellent Linux desktop environment. But of late, I’ve found myself gravitating towards some of the more lightweight environments. MATE (which is a forked version of GNOME 2) and xmonad. I like my systems to be light on resource usage and highly responsive—those are two absolutely critical things for the way I use my computers. With this week’s release of GNOME 3.24, I decided to jump back into the world of modern GNOME desktops and kick the tires again. In order to give it the best possible shot, I did a clean install of openSUSE Tumbleweed (the rolling release version of openSUSE) and then installed GNOME 3.24 on top of it. (Side note: 3.24 was not yet available in the default repositories when I wrote this article, but it should be shortly.) Read more Also: Applying to Outreachy and GSoC for Fedora and GNOME

OpenSuse Leap Reinforces Linux Faith

Leap is a solid performer. I had no trouble installing it on MBR and EFI systems. Secure Boot tends to be buggy with some configurations, but it was incident-free with this installation. The bootloader handles multiboot with other Linux distributions or Windows fairly trouble-free. Installation is routine, thanks to the graphical format used. Only 64-bit versions are available for x86 computers, which limits access to legacy hardware in the 32-bit machines. ARM ports are available if you can track them down through the project's wiki. Read more

Modular, open source robotics kit lets you build your own 3D printer

Plugg.ee Labs’s Cortex-M3 based “JuicyBoard” robotics kit is designed for building stepper motor controlled devices like 3D printers or CNC routers. The JuicyBoard has surpassed its modest funding goals on Crowd Supply, providing a modular, open source development kit for stepper motor oriented devices such as 3D printers and CNC routers. Built around an NXP LPC1769 Cortex-M3 MCU, the kits are available starting at $179, with shipments due June 15. Read more