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KDE

KDE: Plasma Mobile, Martin on CSD

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KDE
  • How To Test Plasma Mobile OS On Your Computer

    Howdy KDE users! I’ve got a good news for you to spend your weekend with an interesting project. As you may already know, the team behind KDE has announced a new open source smartphone OS named “Plasma Mobile” last year. Since it is a collaborative project, they haven’t set any timeline to the availability of final release. Last week, KDE team has hosted a poll on their Twitter and Google+ pages and requested the community members to help the KDE developers move forward with Plasma Mobile. As a result, 44% poll participants wanted to test the OS. After a lot of users’ request, KDE development team has released x86_64 based Plasma Mobile ISO images, so that anyone can now download and test it on their system or spin up a VM. This is really a great news for KDE fans and for those who wanted to get a glimpse of how it looks like in real time.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 3

    Howdy folks! Here’s your weekly update on our long-term Usability & productivity goal.

  • Server side decorations and Wayland

    I heard that GNOME is currently trying to lobby for all applications implementing CSD. One of the arguments seems to be that CSD is a must on Wayland. That’s of course not the case. Nothing in Wayland enforces CSD. Wayland itself is as ignorant about this as X11.

    The situation is that GNOME Shell and Weston require CSD, but KDE Plasma and Sway do not. In fact we created a protocol (supported by GTK) that allows to negotiate with the Wayland compositor whether to use CSD or SSD.

  • KWin Developer's Response To The GNOME CSD Initiative

    KDE KWin window manager / compositor maintainer Martin Flöser has penned a brief response to the recent GNOME developer's CSD Initiative in trying to get all applications to pursue client-side decorations and abandon title bars in favor of header bars.

    GNOME's Wayland strategy has been all about using client-side decorations (CSD) rather than server-side decorations (SSD) although Wayland does not force applications to use CSDs. GNOME and the Weston reference compositor notably use client-side decorations while KDE has been all about server-side decorations.

KDE Invites Users to Test Plasma Mobile, Releases First-Ever Dedicated ISO Image

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KDE

Last week, KDE pledged to make 2018 the year its Plasma Mobile user interface for mobile devices becomes fully a functional mobile environment and deploy it on as many devices as possible, including the upcoming Librem 5 Linux phone from Purism, which should be available in Q1 2019.

But they need community's help to test Plasma Mobile on their devices or virtual machines and report issues they might discover. As such, KDE released today the first-ever dedicated Plasma Mobile ISO image that users can download and boot on real machines or virtual ones like QEMU/KVM or Oracle's VirtualBox.

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KDE: Season Of KDE and Qt 5.11

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KDE
  • Season Of KDE midway status report

    Hey everyone…half the period of 40 days project of SoK has passed and if I had to describe it in 3-4 words, it would be: “Super awesome”, “Incredible learning experience”, “Helpful support” and “Hard work”.

  • Branching from 'dev' to '5.11' started

    We have now soft branched '5.11' from dev so please start using '5.11' now. Qt 5.11 feature freeze and final downmerge from 'dev' to '5.11' will happen Wed 31.1.2018 so there is still enough time to finalize ongoing changes in 'dev'.

  • The Qt 5.11 Feature Freeze Is Imminent

    While it feels like Qt 5.10 was just released a short time ago, the scheduled feature freeze and branching for Qt 5.11 is imminent.

    Release manager Jani Heikkinen at The Qt Company announced today the soft branching of "5.11" from their "dev" branch. The hard feature freeze for Qt 5.11 is next week on 31 January. Features that don't get merged in time will be delayed to Qt 5.12.

KDE: Bounties, Kubuntu 17.10 Guide, KDAB and Qt

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KDE
  • KDE Contributors: Your work matters to people

    [We made someone very happy]

    This feature was implemented by one of our newer contributors, Andreas Krutzler, who’s already making a name for himself with some high-quality work on Dolphin. Great Job, Andreas!

    Sometimes our labors can seem a bit abstract, but as the above screenshot shows, it makes a difference. Our software gets used every day by millions of real people with real needs, frustrations, challenges, and triumphs.

  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 2
  • Discover makes your app look gooooood

    A common user complaint about Discover has been that the design could use some improvement. We set out to remedy this in the soon-approaching release of Plasma 5.12, with the aid of KDE’s Visual Design Group. VDG members came up with endless ideas and mockups, and we spent weeks discussing things and iterating on the design. I wanted to share the evolution of a single view in Discover: the application page.

  • KDAB at Embedded World 2018

    See for yourself our spectacular demos showing our work in Qt, C++ and Qt 3D, including some of KDAB’s best known tools, GammaRay, Hotspot and Clazy, developed to enhance efficiency in our client projects, and Qt Automotive Suite – taking the hassle out of developing for automotive, using Qt.

  • Qt in Visual Studio: A New Approach Based on MSBuild

Off and On Again: The story of KDE Plasma's desktop icons; 5.12 improvements

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KDE

Recent news in the Linux desktop community recall an interesting time in Plasma's history: Release 4.1 in 2008, Plasma's second release ever, that time we (in)famously abandoned desktop icons (sneak preview: they came back).

Of course we never really abandoned them. Instead, in 4.1 we initially debuted the Folder View technology, which powers most of the ways to browse file locations on a Plasma desktop. Folder View gives you folder widgets on the desktop, folder popups on your panels - and yes, desktop icons, which always remained a supported option. An option we, crucially, did decide to tick default-off at the time. Instead we chose to place a folder widget on the default desktop, in part to reinforce the then-new widget-oriented ways of doing things in Plasma, things older KDE desktops just couldn't do.

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Also: KDE Plasma Remains Committed To Supporting Icons On The Desktop

Qt 5.9.4 Released

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KDE

I am pleased to inform that Qt 5.9.4 is released today. As a patch release Qt 5.9.4 does not add any new functionality, but provides many bug fixes and other improvements.

Compared to Qt 5.9.3, the new Qt 5.9.4 contains nearly 200 bug fixes and in total more than 500 changes since Qt 5.9.3. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.9.4.

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Also: Qt 5.9.4 Released With Close To 200 Bug Fixes

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, Krita Interview, GNOME Builder

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KDE
GNOME
  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2

    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...

  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma

    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time?

    Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.

  • Builder happenings for January

    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors.

    I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.

Revisited: Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE

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KDE
Linux
Reviews

Long-time readers of the Linux distribution reviews on this blog know that I am a fan of Linux Mint, but I have had somewhat mixed experiences with KDE. When I've reviewed a new release of Linux Mint, I have occasionally reviewed its KDE edition in addition to its GNOME/MATE/Cinnamon and Xfce editions, generally finding that the KDE edition has too many minor bugs and not enough compelling features compared to the more mainstream editions. Apparently the Linux Mint developers feel similarly, as this is the last release of a KDE edition for Linux Mint; henceforth, they are only releasing MATE, Cinnamon, and Xfce editions for a tighter focus on GTK-based DEs and applications. With that in mind, I figured it was worth reviewing a KDE edition of Linux Mint one final time. I tested it on a live USB system made with the "dd" command. Follow the jump to see what it's like.

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KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

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GNU
KDE
Linux

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices.

With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode.

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KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

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KDE
Slack
  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!

    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly Wink

  • What about AppImage?

    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover.

    It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager

    This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.

  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more

    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

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More in Tux Machines

NuTyX 10.1-rc1 Available

I'm very please to propose you the first release candidate version of the next version 10.1 stable version of NuTyX As they have been so many security issues, I took the chance to recompile all the collections (1701 packages) for this coming next stable NuTyX version. Read more

Android Leftovers

Events: FOSDEM Samba Talks, USENIX Enigma, LCA (linux.conf.au) and FAST18

  • Authentication and authorization in Samba 4
    Volker Lendecke is one of the first contributors to Samba, having submitted his first patches in 1994. In addition to developing other important file-sharing tools, he's heavily involved in development of the winbind service, which is implemented in winbindd. Although the core Active Directory (AD) domain controller (DC) code was written by his colleague Stefan Metzmacher, winbind is a crucial component of Samba's AD functionality. In his information-packed talk at FOSDEM 2018, Lendecke said he aimed to give a high-level overview of what AD and Samba authentication is, and in particular the communication pathways and trust relationships between the parts of Samba that authenticate a Samba user in an AD environment.
  • Two FOSDEM talks on Samba 4
    Much as some of us would love never to have to deal with Windows, it exists. It wants to authenticate its users and share resources like files and printers over the network. Although many enterprises use Microsoft tools to do this, there is a free alternative, in the form of Samba. While Samba 3 has been happily providing authentication along with file and print sharing to Windows clients for many years, the Microsoft world has been slowly moving toward Active Directory (AD). Meanwhile, Samba 4, which adds a free reimplementation of AD on Linux, has been increasingly ready for deployment. Three short talks at FOSDEM 2018 provided three different views of Samba 4, also known as Samba-AD, and left behind a pretty clear picture that Samba 4 is truly ready for use. I will cover the first two talks in this article, and the third in a later one.
  • A report from the Enigma conference
    The 2018 USENIX Enigma conference was held for the third time in January. Among many interesting talks, three presentations dealing with human security behaviors stood out. This article covers the key messages of these talks, namely the finding that humans are social in their security behaviors: their decision to adopt a good security practice is hardly ever an isolated decision. Security conferences tend to be dominated by security researchers demonstrating their latest exploits. The talks are attack-oriented, they keep a narrow focus, and usually they close with a dark outlook. The security industry has been doing security conferences like this for twenty years and seems to prefer this format. Yet, if you are tired of this style, the annual USENIX Enigma conference is a welcome change of pace. Most of the talks are defense-oriented, they have a horizon going far beyond technology alone, and they are generally focused on successful solutions.
  • DIY biology
    A scientist with a rather unusual name, Meow-Ludo Meow-Meow, gave a talk at linux.conf.au 2018 about the current trends in "do it yourself" (DIY) biology or "biohacking". He is perhaps most famous for being prosecuted for implanting an Opal card RFID chip into his hand; the Opal card is used for public transportation fares in Sydney. He gave more details about his implant as well as describing some other biohacking projects in an engaging presentation. Meow-Meow is a politician with the Australian Science Party, he said by way of introduction; he has run in the last two elections. He founded BioFoundry, which is "Australia's first open-access molecular biology lab"; there are now two such labs in the country. He is also speaks frequently as "an emerging technology evangelist" for biology as well as other topics.
  • Notes from FAST18

    I attended the technical sessions of Usenix's File And Storage Technology conference this week. Below the fold, notes on the papers that caught my attention.

Security: Vista10 and uTorrent Holes Found by Google

  • Google drops new Edge zero-day as Microsoft misses 90-day deadline

    Google originally shared details of the flaw with Microsoft on 17 November 2017, but Microsoft wasn’t able to come up with a patch within Google’s non-negotiable “you have 90 days to do this” period.

  • Google Goes Public with Another Major Windows 10 Bug
    After revealing an Edge browser vulnerability that Microsoft failed to fix, Google is now back with another disclosure, this time aimed at Windows 10 Fall Creators Update (version 1709), but potentially affecting other Windows versions as well. James Forshaw, a security researcher that’s part of Google’s Project Zero program, says the elevation of privilege vulnerability can be exploited because of the way the operating system handles calls to Advanced Local Procedure Call (ALPC). This means a standard user could obtain administrator privileges on a Windows 10 computer, which in the case of an attack, could eventually lead to full control over the impacted system. But as Neowin noted, this is the second bug discovered in the same function, and both of them, labeled as 1427 and 1428, were reported to Microsoft on November 10, 2017. Microsoft said it fixed them with the release of the February 2018 Patch Tuesday updates, yet as it turns out, only issue 1427 was addressed.
  • uTorrent bugs let websites control your computer and steal your downloads

    The vulnerabilities, according to Project Zero, make it possible for any website a user visits to control key functions in both the uTorrent desktop app for Windows and in uTorrent Web, an alternative to desktop BitTorrent apps that uses a web interface and is controlled by a browser. The biggest threat is posed by malicious sites that could exploit the flaw to download malicious code into the Windows startup folder, where it will be automatically run the next time the computer boots up. Any site a user visits can also access downloaded files and browse download histories.

  • BitTorrent Client uTorrent Suffers Security Vulnerability (Updated)

    BitTorrent client uTorrent is suffering from an as yet undisclosed vulnerability. The security flaw was discovered by Google security researcher Tavis Ormandy, who previously said he would reveal a series of "remote code execution flaws" in torrent clients. BitTorrent Inc. has rolled out a 'patch' in the latest Beta release and hopes to fix the stable uTorrent client later this week.