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KDE

New KDE.ru website

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KDE

Today, on September 18th, 2018, the Russian-speaking KDE community launches its updated website on KDE.ru.

The new website serves as the main page for the Russian-speaking community. It provides localized information about the community, product download links and the list of social network pages we maintain. It is also meant to help new members get involved in KDE’s projects, particularly in our translation and promotion efforts.

The website was created by me and Alexander Potashev on top of Jonah Brüchert‘s work for plasma-mobile.org. It uses Jekyll and is now hosted on official KDE servers. It replaces the old forum that has significantly lost its users in the past years.

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Qt 5.12 Alpha Released

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Development
KDE

I am pleased to announce that Qt 5.12 Alpha is released today. There are prebuild binaries as well in addition to source code packages with Alpha release.

Please check Qt 5.12 New Features wiki to see what new is coming with Qt 5.12 release. Please note that the feature list is still in progress and not to be considered final before the first Beta release.

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Also: Qt 5.12 Alpha Released With OpenGL ES 3.1 Renderer, Several Wayland Improvements

KDE: Krita and KGraphViewer

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KDE

KDE: KDE Repository Proposal, Belated Akademy Coverage, and Krita Interview With Alyssa May

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KDE
  • Proposal: .editorconfig files in every KDE Repository

    There’s some discussion on D15383 about the use of editorconfig in our sources, I belive that we should have this little file in *all* of our projects (actually I would put this in *every single project that exists*. This is a small file that handles common code conventions per project, for instance the tab vs spaces thing.

  • KDE Akademy 2018

    Yeah I am not in the picture, but I was there! You can find me over on the left there, where several of us were cut off Akademy was held in the lovely city of Vienna, Austria this year. Hats off to the akademy team for a great job!

    This year at akademy I spent much of my time catching up with the Blue Systems team and meeting with the KDE Sysadmin team. I am happy to report Ben Cooksley is real! Due to my flights, I missed the first and last day. It was still a productive akademy. I attended some good sysadmin and KDE Neon BoFs . I also did a bit of volunteering

    Even though I am mostly packaging for Debian directly these days, KDE Neon is still near and dear to my heart. I hope to be able to merge debian packaging into Neon soon so that we can have better collaboration within the team.

    I met with Ben in regards to getting back into sysadmin/CI work. I am working on Appimage tooling for KDE Binary factory to begin. I hope to utilize the craft tooling to make everyone’s lives easier. This of course is on my free time, but do keep an eye out!

  • Krita Interview with Alyssa May

Latte bug fix release v0.8.1

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KDE

Latte Dock v0.8.1 has been released containing important fixes and improvements!

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KDE Week in Usability & Productivity

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KDE
  • KMail Now Supports A Unified Inbox While KDE Keeps Getting Polished

    Come KDE Applications 18.12 in time for the holidays, the KMail KDE email client will finally offer a unified inbox.

    The unified mailbox support for KMail allows for a single "inbox" folder of emails from all of your accounts as well as unified sent/draft folders and other folders.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 36

    Greetings, KDE-loving humans! This week’s Usability & Productivity is a heavy one in terms of importance. We scored awesome fixes and improvements through the KDE software stack for subjects as varied as Libinput mouse and touchpad device handling, Task Manager icon sorting for LibreOffice, and a snazzy new unified mailbox in KMail.

KDE: Elisa, Krita and KDE Itinerary

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KDE
  • KDE's Elisa Music Player 0.3 Enters Beta

    Elisa is one of several options when it comes to music players for the KDE desktop. Elisa 0.3 entered beta this week as another step forward for this relatively young project.

  • The Krita 2018 Fundraiser Starts: Squash the Bugs!

    It’s time for a new Krita fundraiser! Our goal this year is to make it possible for the team to focus on one thing only: stability. Our previous fundraisers were all about features: adding new features, extending existing features. Thanks to your help, Krita has grown at breakneck speed!

    [...]

    As an experiment, Dmitry has just spent about a month on area of Krita: selections. And now there are only a few issues left with selection handling: the whole area has been enormously improved. And now we want to ask you to make it possible for us to do the same with some other important areas in krita, ranging from papercuts to brush engines, from color management to resource management. We’ve dug through the bugs database, grouped some things together and arrived at a list of ten areas where we feel we can improve Krita a lot.

    The list is order of number of reports, but if you support Krita in this fundraiser, you’ll be able to vote for what you think is important! Voting is fun, after all, and we love to hear from you all what you find the most important things.

  • KDE Itinerary - Static Knowledge

    In the previous post on writing custom data extractors for the KItinerary framework, I mentioned we are augmenting extracted data with knowledge from Wikidata. This post will cover this aspect in more detail.

    Static knowledge refers to information that with near certainty don’t change for the duration of your trip, or during a release cycle of our software. That’s things like name, location and timezone of an airport, or the country it belongs to, as opposed to dynamic knowledge like departure gates or platforms, delays, etc.

Plasma 5.14 Beta Updates Discover, KWin and Adds New Widgets

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KDE

Thursday, 13 September 2018. Today KDE launches the beta release of Plasma 5.14.

Plasma is KDE's lightweight and full featured Linux desktop. For the last three months we have been adding features and fixing bugs and now invite you to test the beta pre-release of Plasma 5.14.

A lot of work has gone into improving Discover, Plasma's software manager, and, among other things, we have added a Firmware Update feature and many subtle user interface improvements to give it a smoother feel. We have also rewritten many effects in our window manager KWin and improved it for slicker animations in your work day. Other improvements we have made include a new Display Configuration widget which is useful when giving presentations.

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop Environment Enters Beta with New Features, Improvements

KDE Plasma 5.13 Desktop Reaches End of Life, KDE Plasma 5.14 Arrives October 9

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KDE

KDE Plasma 5.13.5 arrived a week ago, on September 4, 2018, as the last point release for the short-lived KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment series, which won't receive further updates or security fixes. It brought a total of 35 changes across various core components and apps.

"Plasma 5.13 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds a month's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important," reads the announcement.

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A Look at KDE's KAlgebra

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KDE

Many of the programs I've covered in the past have have been desktop-environment-agnostic—all they required was some sort of graphical display running. This article looks at one of the programs available in the KDE desktop environment, KAlgebra.

You can use your distribution's package management system to install it, or you can use Discover, KDE's package manager. After it's installed, you can start it from the command line or the launch menu.

When you first start KAlgebra, you get a blank slate to start doing calculations.

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today's leftovers

OSS Leftover

  • How an affordable open source eye tracker is helping thousands communicate
    In 2015, while sat in a meeting at his full-time job, Julius Sweetland posted to Reddit about a project he had quietly been working on for years, that would help people with motor neurone disease communicate using just their eyes and an application. He forgot about the post for a couple of hours before friends messaged him to say he'd made the front page. Now three years on Optikey, the open source eye-tracking communication tool, is being used by thousands of people, largely through word of mouth recommendations. Sweetland was speaking at GitHub Universe at the Palace of Fine Art in San Francisco, and he took some time to speak with Techworld about the project. [...] Originally, Sweetland's exposure to open source had largely been through the consumption of tools such as the GIMP. "I knew of the concept, I didn't really know how the nuts and bolts worked, I was always a little blase about how do you make money from something like that... but flipping it around again I'm still coming from the point of view that there's no money in my product, so I still don't understand how people make money in open source...
  • Fission open source serverless framework gets updated
    Platform9 just released updates to Fission.io - the open source, Kubernetes-native Serverless framework, with new features enabling developers and IT Operations to improve the quality and reliability of serverless applications. Other new features include Automated Canary Deployments to reduce the risk of failed releases, Prometheus integration for automated monitoring and alerts, and fine-grained cost and performance optimization capabilities. With this latest release, Fission offers the most complete set of features to allow Dev and Ops teams to safely adopt Serverless and benefit from the speed, cost savings and scalability of this cloud native development pattern on any environment - either in the public cloud or on-premises.
  • Alphabet’s DeepMind open-sources key building blocks from its AI projects
  • United States: It's Ten O'Clock: Do You Know Where Your Software Developers Are? [Ed: Smith Gambrell & Russell LLP are liars. Dana Hustins says FSF "purport to convert others' proprietary software into open source software" in there. They paint GPL as a conspiracy of some kind to entrap proprietary s/w developers.]
  • Transatomic Power To Open Source IP Regarding Advanced Molten Salt Reactors [Ed: There's no such thing as "IP", Duane Morris LLP. There are copyrights, trademarks, patents etc. and Transatomic basically made code free.]
  • Code Review--an Excerpt from VM Brasseur's New Book Forge Your Future with Open Source
    Even new programmers can provide a lot of value with their code reviews. You don't have to be a Rockstar Ninja 10x Unicorn Diva programmer with years and years of experience to have valuable insights. In fact, you don't even have to be a programmer at all. You just have to be knowledgable enough to spot patterns. While you won't be able to do a complete review without programming knowledge, you may still spot things that could use some work or clarification. If you're not a Rockstar Ninja 10x Unicorn Diva programmer, not only is your code review feedback still valuable, but you can also learn a great deal in the process: Code layout, programming style, domain knowledge, best practices, neat little programming tricks you'd not have seen otherwise, and sometimes antipatterns (or "how not to do things"). So don't let the fact that you're unfamiliar with the code, the project, or the language hold you back from reviewing code contributions. Give it a go and see what there is to learn and discover.

Security Leftovers