Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

KDE Plasma 5.14.3 Desktop Further Improves Firmware Updates, Flatpak Support

Filed under
KDE

Coming about two weeks after the October 23rd release of the KDE Plasma 5.14.2 point release, the KDE Plasma 5.14.3 point release continues to improve the new firmware update functionality implemented in the Plasma Discover graphical package manager, as well as support for the Flatpak and Snap universal binary formats.

Read more

Plasma 5.14.3 update for Cosmic backports PPA

Filed under
KDE
Security

We are pleased to announce that the 3rd bugfix release of Plasma 5.14, 5.14.3, is now available in our backports PPA for Cosmic 18.10.

The full changelog for 5.14.3 can be found here.

Already released in the PPA is an update to KDE Frameworks 5.51.

Read more

KDE: Window Buttons Applet 0.1, Accessibility, KDE Connect 1.10

Filed under
KDE
  • Window Buttons Applet v0.1

    Window Buttons Applet presents its first release to the public. I always wanted to be able to make my top panel to behave as a window titlebar whenever it is needed. To achieve this some special applets are needed and of course specific behavior from the top panel.

  • Accessibility update – Kickoff, Kicker and KWin improvements

    Chrys took up the role of coordinator, fixer and new master of KDE accessibility, which I think is just fantastic. We have been working on what he decided to be most important, mostly chrys fixing issues to make things work with Plasma and screen readers. After getting Orca to read desktop icons he spent quite some time to improve the various start menus.

    With so much fresh energy around I started poking at KWin, which was a bit scary, to be honest. It was fun to read code I hadn’t looked at before. In the end, after I spent a while working on a huge work-around, it turned out that we could enable the task switcher to work with relatively little code added. The main issue was that KWin does really not want to give focus to the task switcher. My first attempt was to write sub-classes of QAccessibleInterface for everything in KWin. That started to work, but during some debugging I realized that KWin was actually creating the regular representations for its UI, it was just not properly announcing them to Orca. Thus I threw away my almost complete prototype. At least I verified that it’s possible to create an entire Qt UI for screen readers only, disconnected from the actual UI. Thanks to QAccessible::installFactory it is nowadays pretty easy to instantiate custom representations (subclasses of QAccessibleInterface).

  • KDE Connect 1.10 Released To Improve The Android Device Integration

    KDE Connect is the interesting project allowing communication/sharing between your KDE desktop and an Android smartphone/tablet whether it be multimedia content, text messages, or files and more. KDE Connect 1.10 further enhances this interesting effort to bridge Android mobile devices to the KDE desktop.

  • Kernel 4.20-rc1 Is Out, KDE Connect Android App 1.10 Released, Linux Mint 19.1 Coming Soon, Microsoft Ported ProcDump to Linux and Neptune Version 5.6 Now Available

    The KDE Connect Android app version 1.10 was released yesterday. Main changes include "mouse input now works with the same speed independent from the phones pixel density"; "the media controller now allows stopping playback"; the "run command supports triggering commands using kdeconnect:// URLs" and more. There are several desktop improvements as well, and the Linux Mobile App has also gained many new features.

KDE Plasma 5.15 Will Make It Easier to Apply Updates, Improve Kickoff App Menu

Filed under
KDE

According to the report, the KDE Plasma 5.15 desktop environment will make it easier for users to check and uncheck all available updates or select only the ones they want to apply from Plasma Discover's redesigned Updates page. This feature wouldn't be possible with the hard work of Aleix Pol Gonzalez.

KDE Plasma 5.15 also promises to allow NumLock enablement during boot on Wayland, improve the readability of the Kickoff Application Menu with subtle lines that separate the content view from the tab bar and header, as well as to fix the many inconsistencies between the light and dark variants of the Breeze theme.

Read more

KMyMoney 5.0.2 released

Filed under
KDE

The KMyMoney development team is proud to present version 5.0.2 of its open source Personal Finance Manager.

Although several members of the development team had been using version 5.0.1 in production for some time, a number of bugs and regressions slipped through testing, mainly in areas and features not used by them.

These have been reported by many of you and the development team worked hard to fix them in the meantime. The result of this effort is the new KMyMoney 5.0.2 release.

Despite even more extensive testing than usual, we understand that some bugs may have slipped past our best efforts. If you find one of them, please forgive us, and be sure to report it, either to the mailing list or on bugs.kde.org.

From here, we will continue to fix reported bugs, and working to add many requested additions and enhancements, as well as further improving performance.

Read more

Outline of KDE/Plasma Improvements

Filed under
KDE

Future of KDE in Perspective

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE has been deprecated in RHEL 7.6 and future version of RHEL

    Red Hat is moving KDE to EPEL (Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux) repo. To install KDE on a CentOS or RHEL or Fedora, you need to setup EPE repo. Fedora act as a test bed and upstream distro for RHEL. However, Red Hat is not going to put engineering and Software quality assurance (SQA) resources in KDE.

  • Red Hat killing off KDE [Ed: Misleading headline, I think by intention (author's history is a giveaway)]

    Red Hat appears to have used the news of its takeover by IBM to bury the news that it was killing off KDE.

    In the RHEL 7.6 changelog the following appears Red Hat said that KDE Plasma Workspaces (KDE), which has been provided as an alternative to the default GNOME desktop environment has been deprecated.

    'Deprecated' as used in Red Hat Enterprise Linux is a warning that certain functionality may be removed or replaced in the future.

  • Nitrux: Linux, KDE Plasma 5, Qt and Nomad Desktop

    This sounds very similar to Elementary OS, but instead of Gnome and Gtk+-oriented, it's built around Qt and KDE technologies. I like distributions that try to do something more interesting than being just another random Gnome or KDE distribution, and I especially like how the open source Linux community seems to be focusing more and more on polish, design, and simplicity lately. Very welcome additions to the Linux world.

KDE Frameworks 5 for Yocto and Red Hat's Decision on KDE

Filed under
KDE
Red Hat
  • KDE Frameworks 5 for Yocto

    Making KF5 easily available to users of Yocto is actually a rather old idea, and considering how popular Qt and Yocto are for user interfaces in embedded systems that makes a lot of sense. Johan Thelin started the work on this in 2014. Things went dormant for a while until this was revived during Akademy in Almería last year. By now we have 74 of the 79 KF5 frameworks available in the meta-kf5 layer.

    With the KDE Frameworks being mostly libraries, it’s somewhat hard to test and demonstrate their capabilities though. So, we added another Yocto layer, meta-kde, which contains recipes for the Plasma parts needed for bringing up a basic Plasma Mobile shell.

  • Red Hat and KDE

    By a strange coincidece the news broke this morning that RHEL is deprecating KDE. The real surprise here is that RHEL supported KDE all. Back in the 90s they were entirely against KDE and put lots of effort into our friendly rivals Gnome. It made some sense since at the time Qt was under a not-quite-free licence and there’s no reason why a company would want to support another company’s lock in as well as shipping incompatible licences. By the time Qt become fully free they were firmly behind Gnome. Meanwhile Rex and a team of hard working volunteers packaged it anyway and gained many users. When Red Hat was turned into the all open Fedora and the closed RHEL, Fedora was able to embrace KDE as it should but at some point the Fedora Next initiative again put KDE software in second place. Meanwhile RHEL did use Plasma 4 and hired a number of developers to help us in our time of need which was fabulous but all except one have left some time ago and nobody expected it to continue for long.

  • We (may) now know the real reason for that IBM takeover. A distraction for Red Hat to axe KDE [Ed: Misleading headline and unfair slant]

    In other words, if you're using RHEL on the desktop, at some point KDE will not be supported. As our tipster remarked: “Red Hat has never exactly been a massive supporter of KDE, but at least they shipped it and supported you using it.”

    Hats off, our sharp-eyed vulture: Red Hat's long list of deprecated features isn't particularly user-friendly, because a great many deprecation announcements are carried over from previous releases.

    Steve Almy, principal product manager of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, told El Reg in an email: “Based on trends in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux customer base, there is overwhelming interest in desktop technologies such as Gnome and Wayland, while interest in KDE has been waning in our installed base.”

KDE: Frank Karlitschek, Akonadi, 3 Years With KDE and Krita

Filed under
KDE
  • Nextcloud Founder Frank Kalitschek awarded 20,000 euros -- Donates prize to promote inclusiveness

    Frank Karlitschek, the founder of Nextcloud, has won the Reinhard von Koenig award and will be donating the winnings, amounting to € 20,000, to start a fund called "Nextcloud Include".

    The fund, set up in collaboration with KDE e.V., wants to encourage diversity in open source. It aims to help underrepresented groups participate in the global Nextcloud community and foster an inclusive and diverse space where the community can continue to collaborate and develop world-class software. Mentoring, travel support, and internships are provided as part of the program. The program is ran in collaboration with the KDE community under the umbrella of the KDE e.V.

  • We have OAuth and we’re strong

    It’s been a while since I posted anything related to the Akonadi EWS resource, but that does not mean that the project is abandoned – development is ongoing, albeit a little slow.

    Today’s episode of “what’s going on in the EWS world” is all about authentication.

    From the early days of Akonadi EWS interacting with Microsoft authentication mechanisms was a bit on the hard side. Anybody who is wondering why is invited to look into Samba history & development, which should be a good enough indication of the problems we’re dealing with here. This mostly impacted NTLM authentication, which had to be patched in KIO in order to work properly (NTLM version 2).

  • 3 years with KDE – It’s about time!

    KDE life is responsible for a lot of changes in my life, including my personality. I don’t have enough thanks to this amazing community.

    Today I am part of Atelier, the printer host, where 3DPrinting was the first reason that made me into KDE, and that changed my life in so many ways… I really hope to get back to the project anytime soon… And I am also part of the Fundraising WG…

  • My participation at Krita October Sprint

    A few weeks ago I travelled to the Netherlands to be part of the Krita October Sprint. During this Sprint we decided to focus on bug fixing, my tasks included some simple bugs and a couple of more convoluted bugs. I started fixing the simple ones in order to gain speed: one about modifiers not working on OSX, the bug was simple enough but puzzling as the missing logic shouldn’t make the code work on Linux, but it did. The second bug was related to events logic in the preferences dialog command: My first approach was good but not simple, so talking with the team made me change the solution to something much more simple.

KDE apps – Any good?

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

This is the most important application on the desktop. In this modern age, online connectivity is a must, and Web browsers are a portal into this big, chaotic online world. The default KDE browser is, depending on the interpretation, most likely, either Konqueror or Falkon. However you choose, it’s an nth incarnation of an idea that never quite caught on. Konqueror, rekonq, Qupzilla, Falkon, you name it. At some point in time, you must have seen or used some or all of these, alongside other browsers, and it’s quite likely you went with the more mainstream choice. in fact, KDE neon, Kubuntu, openSUSE and several other KDE desktops all ship Firefox as the default browser.

Falkon is a reasonable product, but it’s sort of odd. There’s something about it that deters enthusiasm, and of course, it does not have any killer features over Firefox or Chrome. It feels like a mature product from an incomplete idea, or vice versa. It also does not have quite as much versatility as you’d expect from a Plasma product, and it doesn’t integrate as seamlessly into the desktop as either Firefox or Chrome do, both of which are non-native to the environment. Add plugins, extensions, overall speed and performance, plus stability, which was always odd for K browsers, and you get a game of diminishing returns.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • #RecruitmentFocus: Open source skills in high demand
    The unemployment rate in South Africa rose to 27.5% in the third quarter of 2018, while the demand for skills remains high - leaving an industry conundrum that is yet to be solved. According to SUSE, partnerships that focus on upskilling graduates and providing real-work skills, as well as placement opportunities - could be exactly what the industry in looking for.
  • Stable: not moving vs. not breaking
    There are two terms that brings a heavy controversy in the Open Source world: support and stable. Both of them have their roots in the “old days” of Open Source, where its commercial impact was low and very few companies made business with it. You probably have read a lot about maintenance vs support. This controversy is older. I first heard of it in the context of Linux based distributions. Commercial distribution had to put effort in differentiating among the two because in Open SOurce they were used indistictly but not in business. But this post is about the adjectivet stable…
  • Cameron Kaiser: A thank you to Ginn Chen, whom Larry Ellison screwed
    Periodically I refresh my machines by dusting them off and plugging them in and running them for a while to keep the disks spinnin' and the caps chargin'. Today was the day to refurbish my Sun Ultra-3, the only laptop Sun ever "made" (they actually rebadged the SPARCle and later the crotchburner 1.2GHz Tadpole Viper, which is the one I have). Since its last refresh the IDPROM had died, as they do when they run out of battery, resetting the MAC address to zeroes and erasing the license for the 802.11b which I never used anyway. But, after fixing the clock to prevent GNOME from puking on the abnormal date, it booted and I figured I'd update Firefox since it still had 38.4 on it. Ginn Chen, first at Sun and later at Oracle, regularly issued builds of Firefox which ran very nicely on SPARC Solaris 10. Near as I can determine, Oracle has never offered a build of any Firefox post-Rust even to the paying customers they're bleeding dry, but I figured I should be able to find the last ESR of 52 and install that. (Amusingly this relic can run a Firefox in some respects more current than TenFourFox, which is an evolved and patched Firefox 45.)
  • Protecting the world’s oceans with open data science
    For environmental scientists, researching a single ecosystem or organism can be a daunting task. The amount of data and literature to comb through (or create) is often overwhelming. So how, then, can environmental scientists approach studying the health of the world’s oceans? What ocean health means is a big question in itself—oceans span millions of square miles, are home to countless species, and border hundreds of countries and territories, each of which has its own unique marine policies and practices. But no matter how daunting this task may seem, it’s a necessary and vital one. So in 2012, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and Conservation International publicly launched the Ocean Health Index (OHI), an ambitious initiative to measure the benefits that oceans provide to people, including clean water, coastal protections, and biodiversity. The idea was to create an annual assessment to document major oceanic changes and trends, and in turn, use those findings to craft better marine policy around the world.

Openwashing Leftovers

The Last Independent Mobile OS

The year was 2010 and the future of mobile computing was looking bright. The iPhone was barely three years old, Google’s Android had yet to swallow the smartphone market whole, and half a dozen alternative mobile operating systems—many of which were devoutly open source—were preparing for launch. Eight years on, you probably haven’t even heard of most of these alternative mobile operating systems, much less use them. Today, Android and iOS dominate the global smartphone market and account for 99.9 percent of mobile operating systems. Even Microsoft and Blackberry, longtime players in the mobile space with massive revenue streams, have all but left the space. Then there’s Jolla, the small Finnish tech company behind Sailfish OS, which it bills as the “last independent alternative mobile operating system.” Jolla has had to walk itself back from the edge of destruction several times over the course of its seven year existence, and each time it has emerged battered, but more determined than ever to carve out a spot in the world for a truly independent, open source mobile operating system. After years of failed product launches, lackluster user growth, and supply chain fiascoes, it’s only been in the last few months that things finally seem to be turning to Jolla’s favor. Over the past two years the company has rode the wave of anti-Google sentiment outside the US and inked deals with large foreign companies that want to turn Sailfish into a household name. Despite the recent success, Jolla is far from being a major player in the mobile market. And yet it also still exists, which is more than can be said of every other would-be alternative mobile OS company. Read more