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KDE

Cross Platform PIM on a Stick

Filed under
KDE

Available for memory sticks on Windows or Linux, the new release KDE-PIM/Platform independent lets you carry around your favourite KDE applications and your personal data in the palm of your hand. This device independent software can import your data directly from Outlook and sync it with KDE-PIM running on other computers. Based on the great work of the KDE-PIM developers, KDE-PIM/Pi is available for Windows, Linux and the Zaurus PDA and includes platform independent versions of KAddressbook and KOrganizer (Screenshots).

KDE kdelibs PCX Image Buffer Overflow Vulnerability

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KDE
Security

Bruno Rohee has reported a higthly critical vulnerability in KDE kdelibs, which potentially can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a vulnerable system.

The Linux Box Show: Aaron Seigo on KDE's Future

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KDE
-s

KDE developer Aaron J. Seigo on The Linux Box Show speaks of the new Appeal project and what that means for kde 4.0. He outlines three main principals for the Appeal project and that adds up to more eye candy and functionality for all.

KDE 3.4 offers improved accessibility

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KDE

zdnet has a nice little article covering KDE 3.4 accessibility features. They say, "An improved colour scheme and a tool that reads out text should make KDE Linux desktop more usable for those whose vision is impaired."

"It's a huge improvement in accessibility," said Matthias Dalheimer, a KDE developer. "There is a new screen reading technology for visually impaired people and a much better colour scheme with icons that have a high contrast."

KDE DCop DoS Vulnerability prior to 3.4

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KDE
Security

Sebastian Krahmer has reported a vulnerability in KDE, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

The vulnerability is caused due to an error in the authentication process in the DCOP (Desktop Communication Protocol) daemon dcopserver. This can be exploited to lock the dcopserver for arbitrary local users. Successful exploitation may result in decreased desktop functionality for the affected user.

The vulnerability has been reported in versions prior to 3.4.

Solution: Upgrade to KDE 3.4 or apply patch.

Click for more information and links to patches.

Original information on dot.kde.org.

KDE 3.4 Unleashed

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KDE
Reviews
-s

Defined as a network transparent contemporary desktop environment for UNIX workstations similar to the desktop environments found under the MacOS or Microsoft Windows, KDE provides an easy-to-use highly customizable integrated graphical interface for today's most demanding tasks. These include email communication, newsgroup participaton, web surfing, instant messaging, graphic design and manipulation, multimedia capabilities thru audio and video applications, system monitoring, file managing, and even software package handling. Today we will look at the latest incarnation.

It's hitting the mirrors folks.

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KDE

KDE 3.4 scheduled to be released on March 16 is making it's way onto mirrors as planned. It is still not officially announced yet, but stay tuned. Mirrors should be fairly complete by morning. We will mostly likely get the go-ahead by then.

Please stop by the old homestead here tomorrow for a review and of course plenty of beautiful default and customized screenshots from little ole me in my gallery as well.

Interview, interview, they've all got it in to view

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KDE

On LugRadio Jono Bacon, Stuart Langridge, Ade Bradshaw, and Matt Revell talk about Linux and whatever else comes along, including:

Aaron Seigo, KDE developer, talks about what KDE's up to and dispels some myths about the desktop environment.

Link.

Hot kNew Stuff

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KDE

ca asked why this interview with Josef Spillner wasn't on some of the biggie news sites, so I thought I'd share it on my teny tiny one.

"There has been some recent buzz around KDE's Get Hot New Stuff framework. As the first in a series looking into KDE technologies, KDE Dot News interviewed author Josef Spillner to find out what all this "stuff" was about... read on for the interview. You may also be interested in recent blog entries about KNewStuff: Kate, desktop backgrounds, Quanta, KNewStuffSecure, its user interface design and the HotStuff server setup."

A Week with KDE 3.4rc1

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KDE
Reviews
-s

Well, what can I say that I haven't already said? Not the best way to start an article hoping to get read, but this has been the most uneventful week using kde yet, and I've been using kde quite a long time.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News/Leftovers

Cloudgizer: An introduction to a new open source web development tool

Cloudgizer is a free open source tool for building web applications. It combines the ease of scripting languages with the performance of C, helping manage the development effort and run-time resources for cloud applications. Cloudgizer works on Red Hat/CentOS Linux with the Apache web server and MariaDB database. It is licensed under Apache License version 2. Read more

James Bottomley on Linux, Containers, and the Leading Edge

It’s no secret that Linux is basically the operating system of containers, and containers are the future of the cloud, says James Bottomley, Distinguished Engineer at IBM Research and Linux kernel developer. Bottomley, who can often be seen at open source events in his signature bow tie, is focused these days on security systems like the Trusted Platform Module and the fundamentals of container technology. Read more

TransmogrifAI From Salesforce

  • Salesforce plans to open-source the technology behind its Einstein machine-learning services
    Salesforce is open-sourcing the method it has developed for using machine-learning techniques at scale — without mixing valuable customer data — in hopes other companies struggling with data science problems can benefit from its work. The company plans to announce Thursday that TransmogrifAI, which is a key part of the Einstein machine-learning services that it believes are the future of its flagship Sales Cloud and related services, will be available for anyone to use in their software-as-a-service applications. Consisting of less than 10 lines of code written on top of the widely used Apache Spark open-source project, it is the result of years of work on training machine-learning models to predict customer behavior without dumping all of that data into a common training ground, said Shubha Nabar, senior director of data science for Salesforce Einstein.
  • Salesforce open-sources TransmogrifAI, the machine learning library that powers Einstein
    Machine learning models — artificial intelligence (AI) that identifies relationships among hundreds, thousands, or even millions of data points — are rarely easy to architect. Data scientists spend weeks and months not only preprocessing the data on which the models are to be trained, but extracting useful features (i.e., the data types) from that data, narrowing down algorithms, and ultimately building (or attempting to build) a system that performs well not just within the confines of a lab, but in the real world.