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KDE

KDE 4.0 Release Schedule Finalised

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KDE

The KDE Community and the release team have put together a release plan for the long anticipated version 4.0, which is planned to be released in October 2007. KDE 4.0 will be a major milestone for the Free Desktop, as it offers a new foundation and set of frameworks that will shape the desktop user experience for years to come.

A month with KDE

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KDE

Last month I wrote a piece saying that I was going to try KDE for a month (I’m a big GNOME fan!) and then report back on my experiences. I must admit I’m feeling relieved to be back with GNOME as I never really felt comfortable with KDE, but that’s not to say it was all bad.

KDE 4 roadmap made official

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KDE

It has already been reported by several blogs and news pages, therefore I’m safe blogging about it now. The previously discussed schedule is out in the wild. The KDE 4.0 schedule has officially been released to the KDE development wiki. Also, a roadmap and a module status page ahs been added.

Konsole Survey

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KDE

One of the areas of Konsole which I really want to give a little love for KDE 4 is the terminal setup ( terminal features, colour schemes, display options, character encoding etc. ) and creation of profiles for different types of terminal.

Living in the real world with KDE

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KDE

Today (and the last few days, and I generally does that quite all the time) I have been using KDE applications extensively in real life projects, today a tight day in the fundraising group in the sailing club.

Discussing via email what should go in our ‘sales’ material, and producing that material using KWord, Krita, Digikam, Konqueror and KPDF.

KDE@CeBIT: first two days

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KDE

Carsten was already faster and blogged about day 3@CeBIT - so it's time to talk about the first two days Smile

The first two days we had a rather small booth compared to other projects in the LinuxPark (Hall 5): Placed in the corner next to the Debian booth (see photo). However, we managed to attract many interested eyes, and that's after all what's important (see photo).

People Behind KDE: Pino Toscano

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KDE
Interviews

Pino Toscano
Date: 15th March 2007

A SHORT INTRO

Age: 21
Located in: Catania, Italy
Occupation: University student
Nickname on IRC: pinotree
Claim to Fame: okular, kig, KDE-Edu
Fav. KDE applications: Konqueror, Kate, KNetwalk
Blog: http://www.kdedevelopers.org/blog/2661

THE INTERVIEW

In what ways do you make a contribution to KDE?

KDE 4 to be Released in October

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KDE

Hereby we, the Release Team, present a draft KDE 4.0 Release roadmap which has
been discussed on our mailinglist the past few weeks. It's an optimistic schedule
that aims to release in late October, based on 3 Beta's and 2 release candidates.

KDE 4.0 Roadmap
===============

Milestone: Subsystem Freeze
Date: 1 April 2007

Milestone: Alpha Release + kdelibs soft API Freeze

The Road to KDE 4: Amarok 2 Development is Underway

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KDE

This week we'll take a brief look at some of the many features that are making their way into Amarok 2, which is the development branch for Amarok in KDE 4.The features discussed are all in progress features which have reached varying stages of completion. Read on for information about Amarok's engines (including Phonon), UI changes, changes to the Magnatune music store, OS X support, and more.

Join the KDE Event Coordination Task Force now!

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KDE

KDE is visiting a lot of events on a yearly basis. In most cases, the booth is staffed by volunteers. A successful event attendance depends on a number of factors, if those aren't considered, it might end in frustrated, or even burnt out contributors. But getting it right is not just about "went good / bad", there are various shades of grey. Having a look at past events, the most important factors seem to be in two groups, general considerations and planning and per-event planning.

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More in Tux Machines

Brave browser switches to Chromium code base

  • Brave browser switches to Chromium code base for faster performance
    While Brave used Chromium’s back-end code since its inception in 2016, it used the Muon library for its UI. The company says that the new code base translates to a 22-percent performance improvement. It added that users should notice an 8-to-10-second gain on website load times, as compared to the previous version.
  • Brave browser switches base code to Chromium
    Brave browser has announced that it will fully switch to a Chromium base in its latest release, TheNextWeb reports. Brave used Chromium code since its inception in 2016, but used the Muon library for its UI. Brave joins the likes of Chrome, Edge, Opera, and Vivaldi to use Google’s open source Chromium as the base code for their browser. Version 0.57, the upcoming version that will use Chromium, will also support Chrome extensions and will categorise extensions as “allowed and vetted”, “allowed and unvetted”, and “blocked.”

Happy birthday, qutebrowser!

That's how qutebrowser looked a day after that (and that commit still seems to run!): https://imgur.com/a/xoG1r4G Exactly a year later, things were finally ready for a v0.1 release, after spending two weeks of holidays with fixing bugs. Originally, qutebrowser was born because the dwb project was discontinued: https://portix.bitbucket.io/dwb/ That's what I (and many others) were using at the time, and all alternatives were stuck with an unmaintained WebKit1. Since everything was using WebKitGTK which was horribly buggy (and WebKit2 in WebKitGTK lacked a lot of basic features), I decided to start my own thing, based on Qt instead. Back then, there were already discussions about QtWebEngine, and I originally wondered whether I should just wait with starting qutebrowser until it's ready. QtWebEngine support was finally added in July 2016, a lot later than I imagined. Initially, many features didn't work yet, but in September 2017 it finally became the default backend. Later, it turned out that qutebrowser also was a viable alternative for many Pentadactyl/Vimperator refugees, and qutebrowser got more popular than I ever imagined. Read more

This week in Usability & Productivity, part 49

There’s big news in Usability & Productivity: Firefox 64 can now use native KDE open/save dialogs! Read more

Android Leftovers