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KDE

Qt 4.0 Progress

Filed under
KDE

Qt4 is really progressing well. The only problem at this point is that it still changes a lot even after Beta 2... So what’s new in Qt land since Beta 2?

KDE Kommander Arbitrary Code Execution Vulnerability

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KDE
Security

Eckhart Wörner has reported a vulnerability in KDE, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

Cross Platform PIM on a Stick

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KDE

Available for memory sticks on Windows or Linux, the new release KDE-PIM/Platform independent lets you carry around your favourite KDE applications and your personal data in the palm of your hand. This device independent software can import your data directly from Outlook and sync it with KDE-PIM running on other computers. Based on the great work of the KDE-PIM developers, KDE-PIM/Pi is available for Windows, Linux and the Zaurus PDA and includes platform independent versions of KAddressbook and KOrganizer (Screenshots).

KDE kdelibs PCX Image Buffer Overflow Vulnerability

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KDE
Security

Bruno Rohee has reported a higthly critical vulnerability in KDE kdelibs, which potentially can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a vulnerable system.

The Linux Box Show: Aaron Seigo on KDE's Future

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KDE
-s

KDE developer Aaron J. Seigo on The Linux Box Show speaks of the new Appeal project and what that means for kde 4.0. He outlines three main principals for the Appeal project and that adds up to more eye candy and functionality for all.

KDE 3.4 offers improved accessibility

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KDE

zdnet has a nice little article covering KDE 3.4 accessibility features. They say, "An improved colour scheme and a tool that reads out text should make KDE Linux desktop more usable for those whose vision is impaired."

"It's a huge improvement in accessibility," said Matthias Dalheimer, a KDE developer. "There is a new screen reading technology for visually impaired people and a much better colour scheme with icons that have a high contrast."

KDE DCop DoS Vulnerability prior to 3.4

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KDE
Security

Sebastian Krahmer has reported a vulnerability in KDE, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

The vulnerability is caused due to an error in the authentication process in the DCOP (Desktop Communication Protocol) daemon dcopserver. This can be exploited to lock the dcopserver for arbitrary local users. Successful exploitation may result in decreased desktop functionality for the affected user.

The vulnerability has been reported in versions prior to 3.4.

Solution: Upgrade to KDE 3.4 or apply patch.

Click for more information and links to patches.

Original information on dot.kde.org.

KDE 3.4 Unleashed

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KDE
Reviews
-s

Defined as a network transparent contemporary desktop environment for UNIX workstations similar to the desktop environments found under the MacOS or Microsoft Windows, KDE provides an easy-to-use highly customizable integrated graphical interface for today's most demanding tasks. These include email communication, newsgroup participaton, web surfing, instant messaging, graphic design and manipulation, multimedia capabilities thru audio and video applications, system monitoring, file managing, and even software package handling. Today we will look at the latest incarnation.

It's hitting the mirrors folks.

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KDE

KDE 3.4 scheduled to be released on March 16 is making it's way onto mirrors as planned. It is still not officially announced yet, but stay tuned. Mirrors should be fairly complete by morning. We will mostly likely get the go-ahead by then.

Please stop by the old homestead here tomorrow for a review and of course plenty of beautiful default and customized screenshots from little ole me in my gallery as well.

Interview, interview, they've all got it in to view

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KDE

On LugRadio Jono Bacon, Stuart Langridge, Ade Bradshaw, and Matt Revell talk about Linux and whatever else comes along, including:

Aaron Seigo, KDE developer, talks about what KDE's up to and dispels some myths about the desktop environment.

Link.

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OSS: IBM, Logz.io, Forbes FUD and OpenAI

Graphics: Mesa and More

Red Hat Leftovers

Kernel: CH341 and LWN Articles (Just Freed)

  • Linux Adds CH341 GPIO
    There was a time when USB to serial hardware meant one company: FTDI. But today there are quite a few to choose from and one of the most common ones is the WCH CH341. There’s been support for these chips in Linux for a while, but only for use as a communication port. The device actually has RS232, I2C, SPI, and 8 general purpose I/O (GPIO) pins. [ZooBaB] took an out-of-tree driver that exposes the GPIO, and got it working with some frightening-looking CH341 boards.
  • Shrinking the kernel with an axe
    This is the third article of a series discussing various methods of reducing the size of the Linux kernel to make it suitable for small environments. The first article provided a short rationale for this topic, and covered link-time garbage collection. The second article covered link-time optimization (LTO) and compared its results to link-time garbage collection. In this article we'll explore ways to make LTO more effective at optimizing kernel code away, as well as more assertive strategies to achieve our goal.
  • The rest of the 4.16 merge window
    At the close of the 4.16 merge window, 11,746 non-merge changesets had been merged; that is 5,000 since last week's summary. This merge window is thus a busy one, though not out of line with its predecessors — 4.14 had 11,500 changesets during its merge window, while 4.15 had 12,599. Quite a bit of that work is of the boring internal variety; over 600 of those changesets were device-tree updates, for example. But there was still a fair amount of interesting work merged in the second half of the 4.16 merge window; read on for the highlights.