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KDE

KDE: Plasma 5.16 Work, Latte Dock, December/January in KDE Itinerary

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KDE
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 55

    First I have some exciting personal news to share: I’ve been hired by Blue Systems to work on KDE projects full time as QA manager!

    This means I don’t need community sponsorship via Patreon and will be shutting it down after this month. I’ll be keeping the PayPal and LiberaPay links to serve as a sort of “digital tip jar”, but I don’t need longer looking for internet money to support my family. Blue Systems is seeing to that now.

  • KDE Plasma 5.16 Getting Rewritten System Settings' Colors Page

    Nate Graham, who has now been hired by Blue Systems to work on KDE full-time, has shared many of the both large and small improvements made in the KDE space this week.

  • Latte bug fix release v0.8.5

    Latte Dock v0.8.5 has been released containing important fixes and improvements!

  • December/January in KDE Itinerary

    It’s time again for another update on what has recently happened around KDE Itinerary. Since the last two month summary we had the KDE Applications 18.12 release, so most of the following developments will be for the April release.

GNOME and KDE: GNOME 3.32, Rust, Builder and Krita

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KDE
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.32 Gets Fixed Up For Buggy Zoom Mode

    In addition to Canonical's Daniel van Vugt having been tackling various performance issues with the GNOME desktop, the Ubuntu developer has also been working on addressing various usability issues and other glaring problems.

    One of those issues with a fix now in place is in regards to the GNOME Shell's zoom mode. When using the zoom mode there was the possibility of pop-ups/dialogs being clipped off, text and icons having sharp edges in this accessibility mode, and related issues. The new patch merged in Mutter strikes out these multiple issues, clutter: Fix offscreen-effect painting of clones.

  • Librsvg's GObject boilerplate is in Rust now

    The other day I wrote about how most of librsvg's library code is in Rust now.

    Today I finished porting the GObject boilerplate for the main RsvgHandle object into Rust. This means that the C code no longer calls things like g_type_register_static(), nor implements rsvg_handle_class_init() and such; all those are in Rust now. How is this done?

  • Christian Hergert: A Better Builder – Part I

    As I mentioned in my overview of the upcoming Builder release, a lot of this development cycle focused on improving machinery the user does not see. In the past four years of development, a number of patterns emerged. When I started this project, I had some ideas of how to keep things organized, but Builder quickly grew beyond my ability to keep the whole design in my head at once.

    Thankfully, I’ve worked on many large software teams during my tenure at companies like VMware and MongoDB. These company’s products have something in common, in that they’re a number of sub-systems performing specialized tasks that coordinate with each other. Not surprising, I know. But sometimes, knowing where to draw the lines between sub-systems is what differentiates products. (Interestingly, if you want to build a database engine, you better have a good reason to deviate from page 144 of Architecture of a Database System).

    Now days, Builder segments the code into a series of static libraries. We have a core library that provides the basic functionality used by all sub-systems. We have a process and threading library. One library deals with representing and manipulating source code. Yet another focuses on building, executing, testing, and packaging software. To enable Language Servers, we have one too. Even the gui and editor are somewhat compartmentalized.

  • New Test Builds: changes to Flow and Saving/Loading

    Krita needs you! We’ve new test builds of what will become Krita 4.2. There are two changes that we really would like everyone to test!

KDE: GCompris, KookBook, KDE Plasma 5.14.90

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KDE

GNOME and KDE: GTK, KEXI, KookBook and Krita

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KDE
GNOME
  • Theme changes, revisited

    We’ve made a 3.24.4 release, to fix up a few oversights in 3.24.3. This release does not include the new theme yet, we will push that to the next release.

    We’ve also made another NewAdwaita tarball, which includes refinements based on some of the suggestions we received since last week.

  • KEXI 3.2 Beta

    Yesterday KEXI 3.2 Beta shipped, effect of improvements from entire 2018. Full info in the wiki.

    That's best KEXI to date! Pun intended because among other things one is especially worth mentioning, entirely new and final date/time grammar for user's SQL.

  • KookBook 0.2.1 – now actually kind of useful

    There was a snag in the KookBook 0.2.0 release, and 0.2.1 is available.

  • Krita Interview with Edgar Tadeo

    Comparing to Photoshop, I think Krita can make good digital painting that looks like it was made with a real brush. However,  PS is not a paint program, Krita’s advantage is its brushes.

KDE: Usability & Productivity Report From Nate Graham

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KDE
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 54

    This week in KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative, something big landed: virtual desktop support on Wayland, accompanied by a shiny new user interface for the X11 version too. Eike Hein has been working on this literally for months and I think he deserves a round of applause! It was a truly enormous amount of work, but now we can benefit for years to come.

  • KDE Now Has Virtual Desktop Support On Wayland

    KDE landing virtual desktop support on Wayland this week is certainly quite exciting while also a new UI was added for the X11 virtual desktop support too. Some of the other KDE improvements that landed this week and relayed by Nate Graham include the digital clock widget now allowing adjustments to the date formatting, the KDE Information Center's USB devices section will now actually display all USB devices, wallpaper chooser view improvements, and various other improvements.

Plasma 5.15 Beta

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KDE

Today KDE launches the beta release of Plasma 5.15.

For the first release of 2019, the Plasma team has embraced KDE's Usability & Productivity goal. We have teamed up with the VDG (Visual Design Group) contributors to get feedback on all the papercuts in our software that make your life less smooth, and fixed them to ensure an intuitive and consistent workflow for your daily use.

Plasma 5.15 brings a number of changes to our configuration interfaces, including more options for complex network configurations. Many icons have been added or redesigned. Our integration with third-party technologies like GTK and Firefox has been made even more complete. Discover, our software and add-on installer, has received a metric tonne of improvements to help you stay up-to-date and find the tools you need to get your tasks done.

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.15 Desktop Environment Enters Beta, Promises Numerous Improvements

KDE Plasma 5.15 Beta Released With Some Grand Improvements

Plasma ergonomics - Lessons in life

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KDE

The bugsy trends aren't unique to Plasma - this is the desktop all over. The agile thingie, the curse of quality and usability everywhere. Even looking at something like Windows, there are far more annoyances in Windows 8.1 than there were in Windows 7, and then a whole order of magnitude more still in Windows 10. These could be seemingly small things - and there sure ain't enough testing to begin with - but they can mean a world to the end user. And if Plasma wants to be top dog, it needs to do everything better than the competition. Today, I uncovered a fresh handful issues, and that's just a couple of extra months of rigorous usage. It will be interesting to see what happens a year or two down the road. Well, my Plasma journey continues. Stay tuned.

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Also: KDE Students Excel during Google Code-in 2018

Essential System Tools: Krusader – KDE file manager

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KDE

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at Krusader, a free and open source graphical file manager. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article.

Krusader is an advanced, twin-panel (commander-style) file manager designed for KDE Plasma. Krusader also runs on other popular Linux desktop environments such as GNOME.

Besides comprehensive file management features, Krusader is almost completely customizable, fast, seamlessly handles archives, and offers a huge feature set.

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This week in [KDE] Usability & Productivity, part 53

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KDE

I totally missed that last week marked the one-year anniversary of my documentation and guidance of KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative. I think we’ve achieved a lot over the course of that year!

Note that this is NOT an exhaustive log of everything that happened this week in the entire KDE community, or even in all of Plasma. The actual number of commits and improvements is always vast and enormous–too much to comprehend, really. The KDE Community is staggeringly productive.

Rather, this is always a curated list of only the user-facing improvements I believe are directly relevant to the Usability & Productivity initiative. And speaking of it, this week we got an interesting assortment of new features, bugfixes, and UI improvements–many of which I didn’t mention but will ultimately be appreciated when taken together

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KDE Frameworks 5.54.0

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KDE

KDE Frameworks are over 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the KDE Frameworks web page.

This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

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Also: KDE Frameworks 5.54 Released With KWayland Improvements, KIO Supports TLS 1.3

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More in Tux Machines

Essential System Tools: QDirStat – Excellent Qt-based directory statistics

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at QDirStat, a graphical application to show what’s devouring your disk space and help you tidy up the disorder. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article. QDirStat is a continuation of the KDirStat utility. QDirStat is based on the latest Qt 5, and doesn’t need any KDE libraries or infrastructure. If you come from a Windows background you’ve probably tried WinDirStat, a Windows port of KDirStat, the predecessor of QDirStat. Read more

KDE is adding Matrix to its instant messaging infrastructure

KDE has been looking for a better way of chatting and live-sharing information for several years now. IRC has been a good solution for a long time, but it has centralized servers KDE cannot control. It is also insecure and lacks features users have come to expect from more modern IM services. Other alternatives, such as Telegram, Slack and Discord, although feature-rich, are centralized and built around closed-source technologies and offer even less control than IRC. This flies in the face of KDE's principles that require we use and support technologies based on Free software. However, our search for a better solution has finally come to an end: as of today we are officially using Matrix for collaboration within KDE! Matrix is an open protocol and network for decentralised communication, backed by an open standard and open source reference implementations for servers, clients, client SDKs, bridges, bots and more. It provides all the features you’d expect from a modern chat system: infinite scrollback, file transfer, typing notifications, read receipts, presence, search, push notifications, stickers, VoIP calling and conferencing, etc. It even provides end-to-end encryption (based on Signal’s double ratchet algorithm) for when you want some privacy. Read more Also: KDE To Support Matrix Decentralized Instant Messaging

Android Leftovers

Canonical Is Planning Some Awesome New Content For The Snap Store

There I was, thoughtfully drafting an article titled "3 Things Canonical Can Do To Improve The Snap Ecosystem," when I jumped on the phone with Evan Dandrea, an Engineering Manager who just so happens to be responsible for the Snapcraft ecosystem at Canonical. As it turns out, that headline will need a slight edit. One less number. That's because I've just learned Canonical has some ambitious plans for the future of the Snap Store. Read more