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KDE

KDE/Qt: Qt Desktops, KDE e.V. Board Dinner, KWin/Wayland, Privacy, KTimer, Plasma 5.11 Beta

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KDE
  • It’s the Qt showdown

    Qt desktops are many and varied. So one may ask, all right, if you have to choose one, which one? Well, the answer is both complicated and philosophical. First, because taste is subjective, and my immediate answer would be Plasma, hands down. The way it is realized in Kubuntu 17.04 is just awesome. The best Linux has to offer on the market right now.

    But let’s say you want to choose from one of the other available Qt-based desktops. What do you do then? Well, that’s why we’re here, and I’d like to give you a multi-dimensional overview and comparison of these different Qt desktop environments. After all, we talked about them a fair bit recently, so let’s narrow it down, shall we?

  • Come dine with the KDE e.V. board in Berlin in October!

    As has become tradition in recent years, the KDE e.V. board will have an open dinner alongside its in-person meeting in Berlin, Germany on October 14th, at 7 PM.

  • KDE's KWin Running On Wayland Gets Real-Time Scheduling

    When KDE's KWin is acting as a Wayland compositor, there's now a real-time scheduling policy to ensure the graphical system is always responsive.

  • KWin/Wayland goes real time

    Today I landed a change in KWin master branch to enable real time scheduling policy for KWin/Wayland. The idea behind this change is to keep the graphical system responsive at all times, no matter what other processes are doing.

    So far KWin was in the same scheduling group as most other processes. While Linux’s scheduler is completely fair and should provide a fair amount of time to KWin, it could render the system hard to use. All processes are equal, but some processes are more equal than others. KWin – as the windowing system – is to a certain degree more equal. All input and all rendering events need to go through KWin.

    We can now imagine situations where a system can become unusable due to KWin not getting sufficient time slots. E.g. if the user moves the mouse we expect a timely cursor motion. But if KWin is not scheduled the system is quickly starting to lagging. Basically what we expect is that when the mouse moves with the next page flip the cursor must be at the updated position. A page flip happens normally every 16 msec (60 Hz), so if we miss one or two we are in the area where a user visually notices this. For a gamer with a high precision mouse this could be quite problematic already.

  • Privacy Software

    As a means to give our work direction and a clearer purpose, KDE is currently in the process of soul-searching. Here’s my proposal of what we should concentrate and focus on in the coming years. I’d welcome any feedback from the community to make this proposal better, and rally up more support from the community, and others interested.

  • Kirigamization of old KDE applications

    There are quite a few applications in KDE that are severely outdated and deserve a new life.

  • Get Plasma 5.11 Beta on Kubuntu from PPA

Qt/KDE: Qt World Summit, GammaRay, Kdenlive, and Krita

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KDE
  • Lots of lights: Generating cities

    Sometimes data visualization might call for more than a graph - you need to visualize complex data, such as that generated by city lighting, in three dimensions to get the full effect.

    KDAB decided to put together a showcase for the Qt World Summit that allowed us to demonstrate Qt 3D's capabilities as a performant next-generation graphics engine, which can draw thousands of lights and objects simultaneously. This also enabled us to show what modern technologies like Qt 3D can achieve when paired with OpenGL, C++ and custom tooling.

  • GammaRay 2.8.1 Release

    We have released version 2.8.1 of our Qt application introspection tool GammaRay. This release contains a number of important bugfixes as well as support for Qt 5.9.2. Especially if you are experiencing corrupt views or crashes when searching in the object tree, or having trouble attaching to a process on Windows, you want to upgrade to the new version. The same applies to users of bleeding edge Qt versions experiencing build failures.

  • Last week in Kdenlive

    This release is only made available for interested testers and should not be used for production. Please report problems in the categories placed on the phabricator page regarding the AppImage / timeline refactoring branch, we will switch back to the normal bugtracker when the beta release will be ready.

  • Krita 3.3 Open-Source Digital Painting App Released with Better HiDPI Support

    Krita, the cross-platform, open-source and free digital painting tool used by hundreds of thousands of artists worldwide, has been updated today to version 3.3, a point release that adds better HiDPI support and many other improvements.

    Prominent changes of Krita 3.3 include support for the Windows 8 event API to bring native support for the n-trig pen in the Surface line of laptops, as well as other similar notebooks from Acer, Dell or HP, refactored hardware-accelerated display functionality to make Krita use Direct3D indirectly instead of native OpenGL.

KDE: Nextcloud, Elisa, and Plasma

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KDE
  • Nextcloud gets End to End Encryption

    Today is a special day for Nextcloud and me because Nextcloud gets a cool and important new capability. This is end to end encryption for file sync and share. Nextcloud supports server side encryption for a long time and all file transfer over the internet is encrypted with

  • Last Week Development in Elisa

    I have focused on keyboard navigation and correct handling of focus. Some preliminary work is already integrated with more to come. I hope to soon be able to use Elisa only with the keyboard and am starting to enjoy the progress so far. This is quite different from the last two years where only mouse and touch screen were usable to interact with Elisa.

  • Plasma secrets: task manager tweaks

    Recently, I have been having a lot of fun with the Plasma desktop. It all started with Zesty Zapus, a phenomenal release that redeemed KDE. In fact, I've boldly proclaimed that my next serious box to use Linux will be running Kubuntu, most likely the upcoming 2018 LTS. It hasn't been this merry since roughly 2006 or so. Happy days.

    With so much time and pleasure spent on Kubuntu, I've dubbed the perfect distro, and then, I've also shown you how to deftly pimp it into sweet submission, as well as graced you with a few more tips and tricks that should make your Plasma experience sweeter still. Now, we will discuss another less known feature in this desktop environment, and that's the task manager. Shall we. 

    [...]

    Plasma desktop is way ahead of anything else in the Linux world right now. Yes, there are still glaring issues and annoying bugs, like the file copy timestamp for Samba shares or the ability to play media from remote devices, but overall, it's shaping up to be an excellent product. There's a lot of thought and attention to detail, and layer upon layer of smart, intelligent functionality packaged in an elegant and presentable way. I'm really really liking this.

    Well, hopefully, today's little guide gives you even more reasons to try Plasma. It started with a revelation that is Kubuntu 17.04, then I've shown you how to pimp this desktop for everyday use, and given you a wealth of tricks that should make the experience even more enjoyable. Finally, we have these task manager tweaks. Well, if you have a request for anything else, don't be a stranger. Shout, happy KDE, and may Plasma be with you.

Krita 3.3.0

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KDE

Less than a month after Krita 3.2.1, we’re releasing Krita 3.3.0. We’re bumping the version because there are some important changes, especially for Windows users in this version!

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Also: KGraphViewer 2.4.2

Neon: the naked KDE

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KDE
Reviews

I had nothing to complain about the technical part of KDE Neon Live run. It was smooth and fast. There were no glitches or unexpected delays (apart from one - I cannot remember the exact details).

However, the lack of the very basic software makes me stop from recommending this distribution to the beginners. It may be a good distribution for those users who know their way in the Linux world well, who are confident in what they need and how to get it themselves.

Do you recognise yourself in the first or the second category of Linux users?

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KDE: GCompris 0.81, Plasma Mobile and Convergence, KDE Plasma 5 and FreeBSD

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KDE
  • Release GCompris 0.81

    We are happy to bring you GCompris 0.81.

    This is a bugfix release to correct some issues in previous version. All GNU/Linux distributions shipping 0.80 should update to 0.81.

    Also, we introduce a new “light” version that doesn’t require OpenGL to run. This means that it should work on any computer. We provide some special windows packages using this option, and also the standalone installer for Linux 32bit is using this option. In this light version, the transparency gradient on the menu is gone, and we had to adapt a dozen of activities that will look a little different in this mode, but should still be usable.

  • Plasma Mobile and Convergence

    Convergence, in the broadest sense, has been one of the design goals of Plasma when we started creating it. When we work on Plasma, we ultimately expect components to run on a wide variety of target devices, we refer to that concept as the device spectrum.

  • Switched to Plasma 5

    I’ve switched to using Plasma 5 as my daily (work) desktop. “So what?” you say, since Plasma 5 has been available since July 15th, 2014. Yep, more than three years on the desktop — see Sebas’s blog for some history. So I’ve finally switched my FreeBSD desktop machine, as a sign that Plasma 5 really is coming closer to the official FreeBSD ports tree.

  • KDE Plasma 5 Is Almost Ready For FreeBSD Ports

    More than three years after the initial release of KDE Plasma 5 for Linux, the support on FreeBSD is getting into shape.

    KDE contributor Adriaan de Groot who has been leading the charge for getting the KDE packages working well on FreeBSD has mentioned he's now finally switched his FreeBSD desktop machine to Plasma 5.

Kubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) and Ubuntu

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KDE
Ubuntu
  • Kubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) Beta 2 testing

    Artful Aardvark (17.10) Beta 2 images are now available for testing.

    The Kubuntu team will be releasing 17.10 in October. The final Beta 2 milestone will be available on September 28.

    This is the first spin in preparation for the Beta 2 pre-release. Kubuntu Beta pre-releases are NOT recommended for:

  • Ubuntu Dock Now Supports Progress Bars and Badge Counts

    Support for the Unity Launcher API has managed to squeak in to the Ubuntu Dock package on Ubuntu 17.10 before the user-interface freezes takes place.

  • LXD Weekly Status #16

    The main highlight of this week was the release of LXD 2.18.

    We’ve otherwise been busy tracking down and fixing a number of issues, extended the user-agent string that LXD uses when talking to our image server and been working on a number of fixes for LXC 2.1.

    We’re also making good progress on the stable release branches and hope to get to tag a number of stable bugfix releases next week.

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KTextEditorPreviewPlugin Reaches 0.1.0 and a Quick Look (Screenshots) at KDE Plasma 5.11

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KDE
  • KTextEditorPreviewPlugin 0.1.0

    The KTextEditorPreviewPlugin software provides the KTextEditor Document Preview Plugin, a plugin for the editor Kate, the IDE KDevelop, or other software using the KTextEditor framework.

    The plugin enables a live preview of the currently edited text document in the final format. For the display it uses the KParts plugin which is currently selected as the preferred one for the MIME type of the document. If there is no matching KParts plugin, no preview is possible.

  • Quick Look at KDE Plasma 5.11

    KDE released Plasma 5.11 beta version at 14 September 2017. The new star feature here is Plasma Vault, an ability to protect your folder with password. You can try it on the latest KDE neon before the Plasma finally released next October. Here is a quick look to the new things on KDE Plasma on neon dev-unstable.

Qt 5.10 Alpha in testing for KDE neon

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KDE

Qt 5.10 got an alpha release last week and rumours are there’s lots of interesting new stuff for Plasma developers and other parts of KDE.

Packages are available in KDE neon but hidden away in the testing repository because there is inevitably some breakage. Random bits of QML such as the clock above and Kirigami seem to be unhappy. Please do test but expect breakage and fixes to be necessary.

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XFree KWin, Plasma, KDE, and Qt/GTK

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Announcing the XFree KWin project

    Over the last weeks I concentrated my work on KWin on what I call the XFree KWin project. The idea is to be able to start KWin/Wayland without XWayland support. While most of the changes required for it are already in Plasma 5.11, not everything got ready in time, but now everything is under review on phabricator, so it’s a good point in time to talk about this project.

  • Adapta Theme is Now Available for the #KDE Plasma Desktop

    A new port brings the Adapta GTK theme to the KDE Plasma 5 desktop for the first time, news that will please fans of its famous flat stylings.

  • A New Project To Let You Run Qt Apps With GTK+ Windowing System Integration

    A Norwegian developer has developed a new Qt platform abstraction plug-in to let Qt applications make use of GTK+ for windowing system integration. The Qt apps rely upon GTK+ as a host toolkit to provide GTK menus, GTK for input, and other integration bits.

  • Ant is a Flat GTK Theme with a Bloody Bite

    Between Arc, Adapta and Numix it kind of feels like Linux has the whole flat GTK theme thing covered.

    But proving their’s always room for one more is Ant.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold
    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes. The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.
  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots
    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion. The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.
  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release
    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."

Samsung Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!
    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.
  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan
    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time. Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions. Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.
  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)
    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM. Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit. You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.
  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros
    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.