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KDE

KDE: Bugs Site, KDE neon, Qt Quick

Filed under
KDE
  • Bugs.kde.org improvements

    I’d like to share some welcome changes that we’ve recently made to https://bugs.kde.org, KDE’s venerable bug tracker. Improving our bug submission process was one of the ideas I submitted to KDE’s 2017 goal setting initiative, and while it wasn’t formally chosen the way the Usability & Productivity goal was, people seemed to think that it was worthwhile to do anyway. The overall task tracking this effort is https://phabricator.kde.org/T6832.

  • Cisco Confirms 88 Products Vulnerable to FragmentStack Bug, KDE neon Rebased on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, GNOME 3.30.1 Released, Rust Announces Version 1.29.1 and Mozilla Launches Firefox Monitor

    The KDE neon team announces the rebase of its packages onto Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" and encourages users to upgrade now. You also can download a clean installation from here.

  • Efficient custom shapes in Qt Quick

    QtQuick includes basic visual item to construct many common user-interface components, but people often ask how to create different visual appearances, beyond rectangles, round-rectangles and images. There’s various solutions to this problem, and with Qt 5.10, there’s the new Shapes module which makes it easy to define paths, ellipses and other standard SVG drawing elements.

  • KDE Bugsquad – Kickoff with Krita! – Part 2 on October 2nd, 2018

    Thank you everyone who participated in the first Bugsquad event! We saw the team page on Phabricator double in membership, and had seven people contribute triaging bugs. Thank you xyquadrat, emmet, spaliwal, eoinoneill, and jtamate! Many of them continued triaging past their assigned blocks, knocking out the majority of the bugs. Absolute rockstars!

KDE: Roman Gilg on Wayland, QtCon Brazil 2018 and KDE neon

Filed under
KDE
  • The State Of Wayland Support For KDE Plasma 5.14

    KDE developer Roman Gilg has shared the current state of Wayland support for the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.14 release as well as an outlook to improvements on the horizon.

    The latest code in the works (awaiting review) has support for drag and drop between native Wayland clients and XWayland clients. Pointer locking and confinement has been merged for Plasma 5.14. There are also input handling improvements and other work.

  • Announcing QtCon Brazil 2018

    We are happy to announce that the 2nd edition of the first Qt conference in America Latina (QtCon Brazil 2018) is gonna happen from 8th to 11th November, in São Paulo. The first edition of QtCon Brazil happened last year, also in São Paulo, and brought together 180 participants from universities, government institutions, and companies acting in the fields of IT services, simulation, medicine and biology, physics, embedded systems, mobile systems, and web services, just to mention a few. It was very revealing to see how much work has been built on top of Qt lately in Brazil. As a indirect result, the "Qt Brasil" telegram group — created during QtCon Brasil 2017 — has currently 320 participants, engaged in a number of daily discussions about all things related to Qt.

  • KDE neon GNU/Linux Distribution Is Now Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver)

    KDE neon project leader Jonathan Riddell announced today that the Linux-based operating system is now officially based on the latest Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series.

    Built on top of an Ubuntu base and using the latest KDE technologies, the KDE neon operating system offers Linux users quick and trustworthy access to the most recent KDE Plasma desktop environment releases on their personal computers while being powered by up-to-date packages from latest Ubuntu releases.

    Using modern DevOps techniques to automatically build, test, and deploy its packages, KDE neon follows a rolling release model where the user installs once and receives updates forever. However, from time to time, the KDE neon developers rebased the entire OS on newer Ubuntu LTS releases, and now they are proud to announce that the latest KDE neon images are based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

KDE Plasma 5.12.7 LTS Desktop Environment Released with 65 Changes, Update Now

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KDE

The KDE Plasma 5.12.7 point release comes three months after the KDE Plasma 5.12.6 maintenance update to improve the stability and reliability of the KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS desktop environment. Updated components include the Plasma Discover package manager, Plasma Desktop, Plasma Workspace, System Settings, KWin, KScreenlocker, KScreen, Plasma Addons, Info Center, and Breeze GTK theme.

Highlights include better support for LibreOffice's scrollbars in the Breeze GTK theme, update notification improvements in Plasma Discover, improved file indexer monitor in Info Center, support for scaling the appearance of the preview widget twice in KScreen, better keyboard navigation of Kicker search results, and the ability for KWin to avoid global static for effects.

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KDE neon Rebased on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver"

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

KDE neon is a project to deliver KDE's wonderful suite of software quickly. We use modern DevOps techniques to automatically build, QA and deploy our packages. We work directly with the KDE community rather than staying far away in a separate project.

Our packages are built on the latest Ubuntu LTS edition and today we have moved to their new 18.04 release. This means our users can get newer drivers and third party packages. There is an upgrade process from the previous 16.04 LTS base which we have spent the last few months writing and running QA on to ensure it runs smoothly.

We have three editions for different use cases. A user edition for those wanting to use the latest released KDE software updated daily but only released when it passes QA tests. And two developer editions built from unstable and beta Git branches without QA checks for those wanting to test or develop our forthcoming software.

You can use our output via the .deb package archive, installable ISOs and Docker images. We also have work-in-progress Snap packages which we can put more development effort into now that we have rebased on 18.04.

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Also: KDE Neon Rebased To Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Now Official

Wayland future and legacy

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
KDE

First I directly admit on what I did teaser for 5.14 in my last update but what will not make it: generic gamma color correction per display. There are two reasons for it. The first one is that some preliminary patches, which needed to be merged first, endured long review phases. The second reason is, that when these patches finally were accepted I had shifted my focus on some other topics, which I decided to give an higher priority.

Before delving into these other topics, a short analysis on why the reviews took so long: first there were of course some improvements possible to my patches, but after these got pointed out in the reviews I did fix them back then pretty quickly. The more striking reason is though that we are just short on people who can actually review KWin code changes, in particular with Martin being not maintainer anymore. That is not only a problem for my proposed code changes, but for anyone’s patches to KWin. And this hasn’t improved since back then. We must find a way to reduce the review pressure on the people being capable of doing reviews somehow, at best with only a minimal hit in code quality. I don’t have a full solution for this problem yet, we will see if we find a good one.

After this is out of the way, let us talk about these other features, which I prioritized higher.

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Semantik – An Open-Source Mind-Mapping App for KDE

Filed under
KDE

Mindmap diagrams are a productive way to visually organize information using hierarchies and relationship links among pieces of the whole. Today, we have a mind-mapping tool ideal for students, teachers, and creative users and it goes by the name of Semantik.

Semantik (formerly kdissert) is a mind-mapping KDE software for efficiently creating documents including thesis, presentations, and reports.

The created maps are converted into “flat” documents such as reports and presentations via document generators which can be used from both the GUI and Command line. You can edit the maps in linear view (as flat trees) or in 2-D and associate map nodes with text, pictures, tables, or diagrams.

Semantik also features its own internal diagramming tool (semantik-d) and combines all of its features (search function, UML-like widgets, etc.) into a simple and organized GUI.

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Good Support For Wayland Remote Desktop Handling On Track For KDE Plasma 5.15

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Plasma 5.15 release due out next year will likely be in good shape for Wayland remote desktop handling.

The KDE Plasma/KWin developers have been pursuing Wayland remote desktop support along a similar route to the GNOME Shell camp by making use of PipeWire and the XDG-Desktop-Portal. Bits are already in place for KDE Plasma 5.13 and the upcoming 5.14 release, but for the 5.15 release is now where it sounds like the support may be in good shape for end-users.

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KDE: Latest on Usability & Productivity

Filed under
KDE

Happy 20th anniversary, KDevelop

Filed under
Development
KDE

20 years of getting feature by feature, sometimes first of its kind, being partially rewritten, getting ported from Qt1 to Qt2 to Qt3 to Qt4 to now Qt5, being made run on non-Linux platforms, seeing hand-overs of maintainers.
At its 20th anniversary KDevelop, now to be called an extensible cross-platform IDE for C, C++, Python, PHP and other languages, continues to provide developers a very reliable and powerful environment to get their code work done. While being inviting to enhance their tool, KDevelop, itself, being a FLOSS software and with no company agenda attached.

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KDE and GNOME: Krita, Bionic and AppStream/AppData

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Let’s Tally Some Votes!

    We’re about a week into the campaign, and almost 9000 euros along the path to bug fixing. So we decided to do some preliminary vote tallying! And share the results with you all, of course!

    On top is Papercuts, with 84 votes. Is that because it’s the default choice? Or because you are telling us that Krita is fine, it just needs to be that little bit smoother that makes all the difference? If the latter, we won’t disagree, and yesterday Boudewijn fixed one of the things that must have annoyed everyone who wanted to create a custom image: now the channel depths are finally shown in a logical order!

  • Almost Bionic

    Maybe it’s all the QA we added but issues kept cropping up with Bionic. All those people who had encrypted home folders in xenial soon found they had no files in bionic because support had been dropped so we had to add a quirk to keep access to the files. Even yesterday a badly applied patch to the installer broke installs on already partitioned disks which it turns out we didn’t do QA for so we had to rejig our tests as well as fix the problem. Things are turning pleasingly green now so we should be ready to launch our Bionic update early next week. Do give the ISO images one last test and help us out by upgrading any existing installs and reporting back. Hasta pronto.

  • Speeding up AppStream: mmap’ing XML using libxmlb

    AppStream and the related AppData are XML formats that have been adopted by thousands of upstream projects and are being used in about a dozen different client programs. The AppStream metadata shipped in Fedora is currently a huge 13Mb XML file, which with gzip compresses down to a more reasonable 3.6Mb. AppStream is awesome; it provides translations of lots of useful data into basically all languages and includes screenshots for almost everything. GNOME Software is built around AppStream, and we even use a slightly extended version of the same XML format to ship firmware update metadata from the LVFS to fwupd.

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Red Hat: OpenShift and Awards

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OpenShift 3.11 Release Update with Scott McCarty (Red Hat)
    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Scott McCarty and numerous other members of the OpenShift Product Management team gave an in-depth look at Red Hat’s OpenShift’s latest release 3.11 and some insights in to the road ahead.
  • Awards roll call: Red Hat awards, June to October 2018
    Depending on the weather in your region, it’s safe to say that the seasons are changing so it’s a good time to look back at what was a busy few months for Red Hat, especially when it came to industry awards for our technical and product leadership. In recent months, Red Hat products and technologies took home twenty awards, highlighting the breadth and depth of our product portfolio as well as the expertise that we provide to our customers. In addition, Red Hat as a company won five awards recognizing its growth and culture as a leader in the industry.
  • More advice from a judge - what it takes to win a Red Hat Innovation Award
    Last year I penned the below post to provide insight into what the judges of the Red Hat Innovation Awards are looking for when reviewing submissions. Looking back, I would give almost the identical advice again this year...maybe with a few tweaks. With all the stellar nominations that we receive, the question I often get is, “how can we make our entry standout?” There’s no magic formula for winning the Red Hat Innovation Awards, but there are things that the other judges and I look for in the entries. Overall, we’re looking for the project that tells a compelling story. It’s not just about sharing what Red Hat products and services you used, we want to hear the full narrative. What challenges did you face; how you implemented the project; and ultimately, what was the true business impact and transformation that took place? Submissions that are able to showcase how open source culture and values were key to success, or how the project is making a difference in the lives of others, are the entries that most often rise to the top.

today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

  • How to be an effective and professional member of the Samba user and development Community
    For many years we have run these lists dedicated to developing and promoting Samba, without any set of clear guidelines for people to know what to expect when participating.  What do we require? What kind of behavior is encouraged?
  • Blockcerts Updates Open Source Blockchain Architecture
    Learning Machine is making changes to its Blockcerts Credential Issuer, Verifier and Wallet to enable native support for records issuance and verification using any blockchain. Blockcerts was launched by Learning Machine and MIT Media Lab in 2016 as new way to allow students to receive digital diplomas through an app, complementing a traditional paper degree. Blockcerts was originally designed to be blockchain-agnostic, which means that open standards can be used to anchor records in any blockchain. The Blockcerts Universal Identifier recognizes which blockchain is being used and verifies accordingly. Currently, the open source project has added support for bitcoin and Ethereum blockchains, but anyone can add support through the project's GitHub page.
  • First full featured open-source Ethereum block explorer BlockScout launched by POA Network
  • Amsterdam-based ING Bank Introduces Open-Source Zero Knowledge Technology
  • ING Bank Launches Open Source Privacy Improvement Add-On for Blockchains
  • Imec tool accelerates DNA sequencing 10x
    As a result, in a typical run, elPrep is up to ten times faster than other software tools using the same resources. It is designed as a seamless replacement that delivers the exact same results as GATK4.0 developed by the Broad Institute. elPrep has been written in the Go programming language and is available through the open-source GNU Affero General Public License v3 (AGPL-3.0).
  • On the low adoption of automated testing in FOSS
    A few times in the recent past I've been in the unfortunate position of using a prominent Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) program or library, and running into issues of such fundamental nature that made me wonder how those issues even made it into a release. In all cases, the answer came quickly when I realized that, invariably, the project involved either didn't have a test suite, or, if it did have one, it was not adequately comprehensive. I am using the term comprehensive in a very practical, non extreme way. I understand that it's often not feasible to test every possible scenario and interaction, but, at the very least, a decent test suite should ensure that under typical circumstances the code delivers all the functionality it promises to. [...] Most FOSS projects, at least those not supported by some commercial entity, don't come with any warranty; it's even stated in the various licenses! The lack of any formal obligations makes it relatively inexpensive, both in terms of time and money, to have the occasional bug in the codebase. This means that there are fewer incentives for the developer to spend extra resources to try to safeguard against bugs. When bugs come up, the developers can decide at their own leisure if and when to fix them and when to release the fixed version. Easy! At first sight, this may seem like a reasonably pragmatic attitude to have. After all, if fixing bugs is so cheap, is it worth spending extra resources trying to prevent them?
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  • Chrome for Linux, Mac, and Windows Now Features Picture-in-Picture by Default
    Chromium evanghelist at Google François Beaufort announced today that Picture-in-Picture (PiP) support is now enabled by defualt in the Google Chrome web browser for Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms. Google's engineers have been working for months to add Picture-in-Picture (PiP) support to the Google Chrome web browser, but the long-anticipated feature is finally here, enabled by default in the latest version for Linux, Mac, and Windows operating systems. The feature lets you detach a video in a floating window so you can watch it while doing something else on your computer.
  • Teaching With an Index Card: the Benefits of Free, Open-Source Tools
  • Decentralized Authentication for Self-Sovereign Identities using Name Systems
    The GNU Name System (GNS) is a fully decentralized public key infrastructure and name system with private information retrieval semantics. It serves a holistic approach to interact seamlessly with IoT ecosystems and enables people and their smart objects to prove their identity, membership and privileges - compatible with existing technologies. In this report we demonstrate how a wide range of private authentication and identity management scenarios are addressed by GNS in a cost-efficient, usable and secure manner. This simple, secure and privacy-friendly authentication method is a significant breakthrough when cyber peace, privacy and liability are the priorities for the benefit of a wide range of the population. After an introduction to GNS itself, we show how GNS can be used to authenticate servers, replacing the Domain Name System (DNS) and X.509 certificate authorities (CAs) with a more privacy-friendly but equally usable protocol which is trustworthy, human-centric and includes group authentication. We also built a demonstrator to highlight how GNS can be used in medical computing to simplify privacy-sensitive data processing in the Swiss health-care system. Combining GNS with attribute-based encryption, we created ReclaimID, a robust and reliable OpenID Connect-compatible authorization system. It includes simple, secure and privacy-friendly single sign-on to seamlessly share selected attributes with Web services, cloud ecosystems. Further, we demonstrate how ReclaimID can be used to solve the problem of addressing, authentication and data sharing for IoT devices. These applications are just the beginning for GNS; the versatility and extensibility of the protocol will lend itself to an even broader range of use-cases. GNS is an open standard with a complete free software reference implementation created by the GNU project. It can therefore be easily audited, adapted, enhanced, tailored, developed and/or integrated, as anyone is allowed to use the core protocols and implementations free of charge, and to adopt them to their needs under the terms of the GNU Affero General Public License, a free software license approved by the Free Software Foundation.
  • Make: an open source hardware, Arduino-powered, 3D-printed wire-bending machine
    How To Mechatronics has pulled together detailed instructions and a great video explaining how to make an Arduino-powered, 3D-printed wire-bending machine whose gears can create arbitrary vector images out of precision-bent continuous lengths of wire.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.4: Updates and Extensions
    The first update in a little while brings us release 0.0.4 of RApiDatetime which got onto CRAN this morning via the lovely automated sequence of submission, pretest-recheck and pretest-publish. RApiDatetime provides seven entry points for C-level functions of the R API for Date and Datetime calculations. The functions asPOSIXlt and asPOSIXct convert between long and compact datetime representation, formatPOSIXlt and Rstrptime convert to and from character strings, and POSIXlt2D and D2POSIXlt convert between Date and POSIXlt datetime. This releases brings asDatePOSIXct as a seventh courtesy of Josh Ulrich. All these functions are all fairly useful, but not one of them was previously exported by R for C-level use by other packages. Which is silly as this is generally extremely carefully written and tested code.
  • 6 JavaScript books you should know
    If there was ever the potential for a giant book list it's one based on our favorite Javascript books. But, this list is short and easy to digest. Maybe it will help you get started, gently. Plus, check out three of our top Javascript articles with even more books, resources, and tips.

Security: Telstra, Google+ and Facebook Incidents, and Latest Updates