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KDE and GNOME: NVIDIA, Krita/Atelier and GSoC Mentors Summit 2018

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KDE
GNOME
  • NVIDIA Working On An EGLStreams Back-End For KDE On Wayland

    With no recent activity on the NVIDIA-led Unix device memory allocation work that all developer communities could get behind to supersede GBM and EGLStreams for use by Wayland compositors, NVIDIA is working on an EGLStreams back-end for KDE's KWin compositor.

    Similar to the work done on an EGLStreams back-end for GNOME and other EGLStreams work by the smaller Wayland compositors, a NVIDIA engineer is now officially working on an EGLStreams back-end for KWin so that the NVIDIA proprietary driver would play well with KDE on Wayland. Up to now KWin has only supported the Mesa GBM interfaces. KDE developers have said they wouldn't invest in developing an EGLStreams back-end, but that they wouldn't be opposed if say NVIDIA would contribute and maintain the code -- that's what is happening now.

  • Shop update! Digital Atelier and a new USB-Card

    And we’ve also created a new USB-card, with the newest stable version of Krita for all OSes. Includes Comics with Krita, Muses, Secrets of Krita and Animate with Krita tutorial packs.

  • GSoC Mentors Summit 2018

    I represented GNOME, sadly alone because the other selected mentor didn’t get the US visa in time. This was my first trip out of India and I couldn’t plan it properly1, so I went there for just the two conference days.

KDevelop 5.3

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KDE
  • KDevelop 5.3 released

    A little less than a year after the release of KDevelop 5.2 and a little more than 20 years after KDevelop's first official release, we are happy to announce the availability of KDevelop 5.3 today. Below is a summary of the significant changes.

    We plan to do a 5.3.1 stabilization release soon, should any major issues show up.

  • KDevelop 5.3 Released With Better C++, Python & PHP Support

    KDevelop 5.3 brings the Clazy analyzer that makes use of Clang, many improvements to C++ support, a whole lot of PHP language support improvements, and the Python language support has seen some fixes as well as the ability to inject environment profile variables into the debug process environment. KDevelop 5.3 has also seen improvements for its support on BSD, Haiku, and other operating systems.

GNOME and KDE Krita Picks

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KDE
GNOME
  • Richard Hughes: More fun with libxmlb

    A few days ago I cut the 0.1.4 release of libxmlb, which is significant because it includes the last three features I needed in gnome-software to achieve the same search results as appstream-glib.

  • Usability Testing in Open Source Software (SeaGL)

    I've been involved in Free/open source software since 1993, but recently I developed an interest in usability testing in open source software. During a usability testing class in my Master's program in Scientific and Technical Communication (MS) I studied the usability of GNOME and Firefox. Later, I did a deeper examination of the usability of open source software, focusing on GNOME, as part of my Master's capstone. (“Usability Themes in Open Source Software,” 2014.)

    Since then, I've joined the GNOME Design Team where I help with usability testing.

  • [Krita] Second Edition of “Dessin et peinture numérique avec Krita” published!

    The first edition was written forfor Krita 2.9.11, almost three years ago. A lot of things have changed since then! So Timothée has completely updated this new edition for Krita version 4.1. There are also a number of notes about the new features in Krita 4.

    And more-over, D-Booker worked again on updating and improving the French translation of Krita! Thanks again to D-Booker edition for their contribution.

  • [Krita] Interview with HoldXtoRevive

    About 4 years ago I downloaded GIMP as I wanted to get back into art after not drawing for about 15 years. I got a simple drawing tablet soon after and things just progressed from there.

KDE Usability & Productivity, Belated Writeup About Akademy 2018 by Sandro Knauß

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KDE
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 44

    Week 44 in Usability & Productivity is coming right up! This week was a bit lighter in terms of the number of bullet points, but we got some really great new features, and there’s a lot of cool stuff in progress that I hope to be able to blog about next week!

  • KDE Plasma Now Supports WireGuard, Alt-Tab Switching Improvements

    The WireGuard secure VPN tunnel is not in the mainline kernel yet but the KDE Plasma desktop is the latest project already adding support for it, which can be useful today if making use of WireGuard's DKMS kernel modules.

    KDE Plasma now supports WireGuard VPN tunnels if enabling the NetworkManager WireGuard plug-in. Previously KDE Plasma didn't play well with this plug-in but now it's all been fixed up to deliver a first-rate experience for this open-source VPN tech.

    This week KDE also received some alt+tab switching improvements for screen readers and supporting the use of the keyboard to switch between items. These alt+tab window switching and WireGuard VPN support will be part of the KDE Plasma 5.15 release.

  • Akademy 2018 Vienna

    You have probably read a lot about Akademy 2018 recently, and how great it was.

    For me it was a great experience too and this year I met a lot of KDE people, both old and new. This is always nice.
    I arrived on Thursday so I had one day to set everything up and had a little bit of time to get to know the city.

    On Friday evening I enjoyed the "Welcoming evening", but I was very surprised when Volker told me that I would be on stage the next day, talking about privacy.

    He told me that someone should have informed me several days before. The scheduled speaker, Sebastian, couldn't make it to Akademy.

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.52.0 and More KDE News

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KDE
  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.52.0

    KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

    This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.52 Released With KWayland Virtual Desktop Protocol, Spins Down Drives

    KDE Frameworks 5.52 is now the latest monthly update to this collection of KDE add-on libraries complementing the functionality of Qt5.

  • Automatic C++ comparison operators

    C++ comparison operators are usually fairly straightforward to implement. Writing them by hand can however be quite error prone if there are many member variables to consider. Missing a single one of them will still compile and mostly work fine, apart from some hard to debug corner cases, such as misbehaving or crashing algorithms and containers, or data loss. Can we do better?

KDE and GNOME: Freenode#live, KDE Applications 18.12 and More

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KDE
GNOME
  • Freenode#live post

    The weekend of 3 and 4 November Dave and I went to staff the KDE booth at Freenode#live, in Bristol. I had never been in that corner of England before, It turns out to have hills, and a river, and tides. Often an event brings me to a city, and then out, without seeing much of it. This time I traveled in early and left late the day after the event so I had some time to wander around, and it was quite worthwhile.

    Turns out there is quite a lot of cider available, and the barman gave me an extensive education on the history of cider and a bit on apple cultivation when I asked about it. Sitting down with a Slimbook and a pint can be quite productive; I got some Calamares fixes done before the conference.

  • KDE Applications 18.12 branches created

    We're already past the dependency freeze.

    The Freeze and Beta is this Thursday 15 of November.

  • Talking at PETCon2018 in Hamburg, Germany and OpenPGP Email Summit in Brussels, Belgium

    Just like last year, I managed to be invited to the Privacy Enhancing Technologies Conference to talk about GNOME. First, Simone Fischer-Huebner from Karlstadt University talked about her projects which are on the edge of security, cryptography, and usability, which I find a fascinating area to be in. She presented outcomes of her Prismacloud project which also involves fancy youtube videos…

  • GSConnect 15 Offers Better Phone Integration With The GNOME Shell

    In addition to this week bringing KDE Connect 1.10 for the communication/integration between the KDE desktop and Android smartphones/tablets, GSConnect as the GNOME Shell port of this open-source software also received a new feature release.

    GSConnect is the GNOME-based version of KDE Connect that provides integration with the GNOME Shell, Nautilus file manager, and also the Chrome/Firefox web-browsers for sharing of data and message handling from Android devices to your GNOME Linux desktop.

Kdenlive 18.08.3 released

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KDE

Kdenlive 18.08.3 is out with updated build scripts as well as some compilation fixes. All work is focused on the refactoring branch so nothing major in this release. On the other hand in the Windows front some major breakthroughs were made like the fix of the play/pause lag as well as the ability to build Kdenlive directly from Windows. The next milestone is to kill the running process on exit making Kdenlive almost as stable as the Linux version.

In other news, we are organizing a bug squash day on the first days of December. If you are interested in participating this is a great opportunity since we have prepared a list of low hanging bugs to fix. See you!

Read more

KDE: French Krita Book and Qt 5.12.0 Beta 4

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KDE
  • French Krita book – 2nd edition

    Last month was released the 2nd edition of my book “Dessin et peinture numérique avec Krita”. I just received a few copies, so now is time to write a little about it.

    I wrote the first edition for Krita 2.9.11, almost three years ago. A lot of things have changed, so I updated this second edition for Krita version 4.1.1, and added a few notes about some new features.

  • Qt 5.12.0 Beta4 released

    We have released Qt 5.12.0 Beta4 today. As earlier you can get it via online installer. Delta to beta3 attached.

  • Qt 5.12 Fast Approaching With The Final Beta Now Available

    The Qt Company has announced the release of Qt 5.12 Beta 4 as the final beta release for this upcoming LTS tool-kit update.

    Qt 5.12 Beta 4 is arriving just two days late, which still provides for hope of closely meeting the planned release target of Qt 5.12.0 as 29 November, but long story short this Qt tool-kit update should be shipping at the end of November or early December.

KDE Applications 18.08 Reaches End of Life, KDE Apps 18.12 Launches December 13

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KDE

KDE Applications 18.08.3 is now available as the third and last point release of the open-source and cross-platform KDE Applications 18.08 software suite, brining about 20 20 bugfixes and improvements to applications like Ark, Dolphin, Kate, KDE Games, Kontact, Okular, and Umbrello, as well as translation updates.

Highlights of this last point release include the ability for the KMail email client to remember the HTML viewing mode, as well as to load external images if allowed, support for the Kate text editor to remember meta information, including bookmarks, between sessions, and updated automatic scrolling in the Telepathy text UI.

Read more

KDE Plasma 5.14.3 Desktop Further Improves Firmware Updates, Flatpak Support

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KDE

Coming about two weeks after the October 23rd release of the KDE Plasma 5.14.2 point release, the KDE Plasma 5.14.3 point release continues to improve the new firmware update functionality implemented in the Plasma Discover graphical package manager, as well as support for the Flatpak and Snap universal binary formats.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Rust and WebAssembly, WebRender, MDN Changelog for November 2018, Things Gateway and Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday

  • Rust and WebAssembly in 2019
    Compiling Rust to WebAssembly should be the best choice for fast, reliable code for the Web. Additionally, the same way that Rust integrates with C calling conventions and libraries on native targets, Rust should also integrate with JavaScript and HTML5 on the Web. These are the Rust and WebAssembly domain working group’s core values. In 2018, we made it possible to surgically replace performance-sensitive JavaScript with Rust-generated WebAssembly.
  • rust for cortex-m7 baremetal
  • WebRender newsletter #33
    Yes indeed. In order for picture caching to work across displaylists we must be able to detect what did not change after a new displaylist arrives. The interning mechanism introduced by Glenn in #3075 gives us this ability in addition to other goodies such as de-duplication of interned resources and less CPU-GPU data transfer.
  • MDN Changelog for November 2018
    Potato London started work on this shortly after one-time payments launched. We kicked it off with a design meeting where we determined the features that could be delivered in 4 weeks. Potato and MDN worked closely to remove blockers, review code (in over 25 pull requests), and get it into the staging environment for testing. Thanks to everyone’s hard work, we launched a high-quality feature on schedule. We’ve learned a lot from these payment experiments, and we’ll continue to find ways to maintain MDN’s growth in 2019.
  • K Lars Lohn: Things Gateway - a Virtual Weather Station
    Today, I'm going to talk about creating a Virtual Weather Station using the Things Gateway from Mozilla and a developer account from Weather Underground. The two combined enable home automation control from weather events like temperature, wind, and precipitation.
  • Taskgraph Like a Pro
    Have you ever needed to inspect the taskgraph locally? Did you have a bad time? Learn how to inspect the taskgraph like a PRO. For the impatient skip to the installation instructions below.
  • Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday, December 21th
    We are happy to let you know that Friday, December 21th, we are organizing Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: and changes and UpdateDirectory. Check out the detailed instructions via this etherpad.

Fedora Developers Are Trying To Figure Out The Best Linux I/O Scheduler, Fedora 29 Review and Fedora Program Management

ARM's Work in Linux (Kernel)

  • Energy Model Management Framework Queued For Linux 4.21
    A new framework queued for introduction with the Linux 4.21 kernel is the ARM-developed Energy Model Management Framework. With different hardware and drivers exposing the processor/system energy consumption in different manners, the Energy Model Management Framework tries to provide a standardized way of accessing the power values for each performance domain in a system. This can help kernel drivers/schedulers and other code that could make smarter decisions based upon current energy use be able to do so via this standardized framework for acquiring the power information on capable systems.
  • ARM's AArch64 Adding Pointer Authentication Support To The Linux 4.21 Kernel
    The 64-bit ARM architecture code (a.k.a ARM64 / AArch64) with the Linux 4.21 kernel is seeing pointer authentication added as a new security feature. Pointer authentication can be supported by ARMv8.3 hardware and newer to allow for signing and authenticating of pointers against secret keys. The purpose of this pointer authentication is to mitigate ROP attacks and other potential buffer-overrun-style attacks. This ARM64_PTR_AUTH functionality will enable pointer authentication for all user-space processes and the presence of supported hardware is determined at run-time. ARM developers have been working on the plumbing for this Linux kernel support for it the past year.

The OSD and user freedom

The relationship between open source and free software is fraught with people arguing about meanings and value. In spite of all the things we’ve built up around open source and free software, they reduce down to both being about software freedom. Open source is about software freedom. It has been the case since “open source” was created. In 1986 the Four Freedoms of Free Software (4Fs) were written. In 1998 Netscape set its source code free. Later that year a group of people got together and Christine Peterson suggested that, to avoid ambiguity, there was a “need for a better name” than free software. She suggested open source after open source intelligence. The name stuck and 20 years later we argue about whether software freedom matters to open source, because too many global users of the term have forgotten (or never knew) that some people just wanted another way to say software that ensures the 4Fs. Once there was a term, the term needed a formal definition: how to we describe what open source is? That’s where the Open Source Definition (OSD) comes in. The OSD is a set of ten points that describe what an open source license looks like. The OSD came from the Debian Free Software Guidelines. The DFSG themselves were created to “determine if a work is free” and ought to be considered a way of describing the 4Fs. Read more