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Pre-KDE/Akademy Posts

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KDE
  • Life in Deventer

    Time passes. In Deventer, it is chimed by the church bells every hour, and during the day, a tiny concert every quarter-hour. To celebrate the Market, there was a concert of bells yesterday. The guest carillon-master was quite showy, with flourishes and trills! The church is in the next block, so we hear the bells very clearly. Behind the house a short distance is the Roman Catholic church, where yesterday we heard the joyous tolling of bells to celebrate a wedding.

    [...]

    In short, life is good! My thanks to the KDE e.V. for supporting the KDE community and Akademy, and sponsoring my accomodation while there. My thanks to the Ubuntu community fund for sponsoring my travel here and back home again. My profound and deep thanks to Boud and Irina Rempt for their generosity, thoughtfulness, hospitality, peaceful house and delicious food, and most of all, for asking me to come and live with them in Deventer this week. This is city living at its finest.

  • I’m going to Akademy 2018 – Vienna, Austria

    Akademy is KDE annual conference and comprises of hundreds of attendees from the global community. The venue is Technische Universität Wien (TU Wien) and I’m glad that I’m being sponsored by the KDE e.V.

  • Going to Akademy

    Like many people around, I plan to attend Akademy this year. I unfortunately was not able to attend it last year, when it was in Spain again and damn, I love Spain, but this time I cannot miss it, especially when it’s so closed to Czech Republic.

KDE: Assistant on KDE Plasma, Engineering Plasma, GammaRay 2.9.1 and Akademy

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KDE
  • An Assistant on KDE Plasma?

    Today, I learned that KDE and Mycroft collaborated to create a Mycroft AI assistant plasmoid.

    Of course, this is not a final product yet and the easiest installation seems to be for Fedora.

    Mozilla is also working on an assistant.

  • Engineering Plasma: Extensions and stability — Present and future

    This week, we have received a number of inquiries into how Plasma extensions, particularly those found on the KDE Store, relate to the stability and safety of a Plasma system. With an engineering focus, this blog hopes to provide answers.

  • GammaRay 2.9.1 Release

    We have released version 2.9.1 of our Qt application introspection tool GammaRay. Besides important improvements for use in Android APK bundles this release fixes a number of corner cases in the Qt Quick remote view, including crashes and corrupt view content when encountering certain non-integer high DPI scaling factors. Problems with activating the Qt 3D inspector when attaching to a running target have also been addressed, as well as build issues with pre-release versions of Qt 5.12.

  • Going to Akademy!

    Here in beautiful Deventer, in the Netherlands, with Boud and Irina Rempt, the first leg of the journey to Akademy is done. The plane ride as always was dreadful, however the train from Amsterdam through the countryside was nearly silent, fast, and beautiful. I'm recovering from jetlag, eating great salads, wonderful cheese, drinking good beer, and most important, chatting up Irina and Boud, and watching the birds play on the nieghboring roofs.

KDE: Kate, Akademy, KDE Connect, Google Summer of Code

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KDE
  • Porting KTextEditor to KSyntaxHighlighting

    After several years, the time has come that KTextEditor finally starts to use more of KSyntaxHighlighting than just the syntax definitions resources.

    At the moment, we still do everything on our own (parsing the xml, doing the highlighting, …) and only use the XML files bundled inside the KSyntaxHighlighting library as “code sharing”.

    I started a “syntax-highlighting” branch in ktexteditor.git to change that. Dominik helped out by starting to add missing API to KSyntaxHighlighting that will ease the porting.

  • I’m going to Vienna as well!

    We’ve already got Valorie here in Deventer, and next week we’ll take the slow train, the international train and then the ICE to Vienna, to attend Akademy. Last time Irina and I attended Akademy was in A Coruña, to present the work I had been doing on Plasma Mobile.

  • KDE Connect – New Stuff II

    It’s time for another feature update for KDE Connect!

    You can now run commands on connected devices from the Plasmoid.

  • Google Summer of Code, Porting Keyboard KCM to Qt Quick — Part 3

7 of the Best KDE Plasma Themes for Linux

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KDE

Plasma is known for being one of the most visually attractive desktop environments for Linux. It’s more than earned its reputation, too. Even the default Breeze theme that ships with Plasma looks great. That’s not to say there isn’t room to customize and improve things based on your own preferences. These Plasma themes capitalize on the great aesthetic that’s already in place and tweak it to create something new and visually appealing for your desktop.

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KDE Plasma 5.13.4 Desktop Environment Released with More Than 45 Improvements

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KDE

Coming almost three weeks after the KDE Plasma 5.13.3 release, the KDE Plasma 5.13.4 maintenance update continues to improve the stability and performance of the KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment by adding total of 48 changes and bug fixes across various components, including the Plasma Desktop, Plasma Discover, Plasma Workstation, KScreen, KWin, Plasma Add-ons, Info Center, Breeze Plymouth, and others.

"Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.13.4. Plasma 5.13 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds two week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important," reads today's announcement.

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GNOME/GUADEC and KDE Software With Microsoft/Windows DRM

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KDE
GNOME
  • Back from GUADEC 2018

    Been a while since GUADEC 2018 has ended but subsequent travels and tasks reduced the time to write up a quick summary of what happened during this year’s GNOME conference.

  • GUADEC Thoughts

    This month I had the amazing opportunity to attend GUADEC, the GNOME community conference in Europe! The GNOME Foundation generously sponsored this trip as part of my Google Summer of Code project and I can’t thank them enough!

  • Krita in the Windows Store: an update

    We’ve published Krita in the Windows store for quite some time now. Not quite a year, but we’ve updated our Store listing almost twenty times. By far the majority of users get Krita from this website: about 30,000 downloads a week. Store downloads are only about 125 a week. Still, the income generated makes it possible for the Krita maintainer to work on Krita full-time, which would not have been possible otherwise.

    That’s good, because combining a day job and working on Krita is a sure recipe for a burn-out. (Donations fund Dmitry’s work, but there aren’t enough donations to fund two people at the same time: we have about 2000 euros per month in donations.)

KDE: Dolphin and openQA, Slackware Updates and Usability/Productivity Roundup

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KDE
  • Dolphin and openQA and other assorted bits

    Part of this post is about openQA, openSUSE’s automated tool which tests a number of different scenarios, from installation to the behavior of the different desktop environments, plus testing the freshest code from KDE git. Recently, thanks to KDE team member Fabian Vogt, there has been important progress when testing KDE software.

  • KDE 5_18.07 for Slackware, includes Plasma 5.13.3 and Qt 5.11.1

    Last week, Slackware-current updated its poppler package . The ‘ktown’ repository for Plasma5 contains a custom built ‘poppler’ package, one that includes Qt5 support. That means that the ‘ktown’ version needs to be kept in sync with the Slackware version to prevent breakage in your Slackware installation. Therefore I recompiled my ‘poppler’ and at the same time, I used the opportunity to grab all the latest sources from the KDE download server and built a whole new and fresh Plasma5 experience for Slackware.

    Important to know is that I have bridged the ‘latest’ repository to the ‘testing’ repository. Meaning: I have said goodbye to the LTS (Long Term Support) versions of Qt5 (5.9.6) and Plasma (5.12) and will focus again on the bleeding edge of KDE’s development.
    I did this after talking to Patrick to see what his ideas are about Plasma5 and whether he would adopt LTS releases of the software, or perhaps stick with the latest and greatest. Based on discussions in the LinuxQuestions.org forum it was clear that the latest Qt (5.11) combined with the latest Plasma Desktop (5.13) gets rid of bugs that have been annoying Slackware users who have been installing my ‘ktown’ packages. So that settled it, and the difference between ‘latest’ and ‘testing’ is gone again. In future I will probably use the ‘testing’ repository to test Wayland usability in Slackware, like I did in the past. For that reason, it’s best if you point your package manager (slackpkg+ comes to mind) to the ‘latest‘ URL instead of using the ‘testing‘ URL.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 29

    Another week, another set of Usability and Productivity improvements! This week we fixed a lot of bugs in preparation for the KDE Applications 18.08 release as well as for Plasma itself.

Plasma 5.13.3, Applications 18.04.3 and Frameworks 5.48.0 by KDE now available to all Chakra users

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KDE

Hi everyone!

On your next system upgrade you will receive all the latest versions of KDE’s Plasma, Applications and Frameworks, in addition to the usual package updates. For more details and the full changelogs on KDE’s software releases, you can read the official announcements:

Plasma 5.13.3
Applications 18.04.3
Frameworks 5.48.0

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Trinity Desktop R14.0.5 Preparing For Release As Maintained KDE3 Fork

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KDE

It's been a while since last hearing anything about the Trinity Desktop Environment, which is a fork of the KDE 3.5 desktop, but a new release is on the way.

Trinity R14.0.5 is the next release being prepped. As implied by the version, Trinity R14.0.5 is just a maintenance release but does come with dozens of bug fixes to these former KDE3 packages.

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KDE and GNOME: Atelier, KDE neon Bionic Update, GUADEC 2018 and Dino

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KDE
GNOME
  • Atelier at The Developers Conference SP 2018

    As you may know, there are two events in every year that I try to attend, one is Campus Party and the resume of that is here, and the second is The Developers Conference.

    And last week the edition of TheDevConf Sao Paulo happened, and I was able to see my friends, connect with new people, and for the first time, I was able to coordinate one of the tracks with my friends Gedeane Kenshima and Fernando Veiga.

  • KDE neon Bionic Update

    The work to rebase KDE neon on Bionic is progressing. Apologies if it feels slow but it’s keeping our infrastructure busy while continuing with the xenial builds alongside. I’ve just managed to get the package version check to turn green which means all the packages are now built.

  • How was GUADEC for you?

    Did you come to GUADEC in Alméria? Did you decide to avoid the sweltering heat and stay home? Were you thwarted by visa bureaucracy?

  • GUADEC 2018

    From the 2th of July I have been travelling from Italy all the way to the south Spain by train, to attend GUADEC 2018. During this long trip, I didn’t just sleep, but I kept working on Fractal and some other cool things.

    [...]

    I was travelling with Tobias, and at some point we randomly met Bastian on the train from Madrid to Almera, so the travel turned into a hackfest on the train.

  • Filter expressions

    During my Google Summer of Code project I implement message search for Dino, a XMPP client focusing on ease of use and security.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • 8 hurdles IT must overcome if they want open source success
    Open source software has the potential to drive innovation and collaboration across an enterprise, and can transform the way developers work together. "Open source is now part of the evaluation criteria when deciding on a software platform, so much so that it is expected," said Matt Ingenthron, senior director of engineering at Couchbase. "In this way, open source has somewhat faded into the background in a positive way. Just like no consumer would inquire if a mobile phone had internet access or text messaging, choosing an open source solution is almost always an option."
  • Sprint calls on open source analytics to prevent cyberfraud
    Mobile phone-related fraud is big business. Fraudsters, hackers, and other bad actors employ creative techniques to compromise networks, hijack user information, and piece together customer identities that are then sold for big bucks on the dark web. To protect its customers, Sprint needed to transform the way it detected and blocked fraudulent activity. “In the mobile phone business, there’s no markup on selling devices — our bread and butter is the network and the services that are delivered on that network, through the devices,” says Scott Rice, CIO of Sprint. “Identity theft is a huge problem and the ability for nefarious actors to use that theft of information to impersonate our customers means we were eating the costs of the devices and the costs of services delivery.”
  • Open Source Platform Delivers LDAP Integration
    The latest release of InfluxData, an open source platform for metrics, events, and other time series data, adds LDAP integration, new advanced analytics, and self-healing capabilities in the time series database platform. According to the company, time series data, collected and stored with InfluxData’s Time Series database platform is integral to observability and is becoming mission critical for organizations. Enhancements to InfluxEnterprise make it easier for administrators to keep this mission critical data available and secure by checking and verifying every requested action. This includes creating databases, storing data and running queries – against a user’s stored authorizations and role.
  • YOYOW-WeCenter Special Edition Release: Free and Open Source
    The YOYOW-WeCenter Special Edition, customized and developed by YOYOW and based on WeCenter Q&A community framework, has been released on GitHub. Compared to regular WeCenter frameworks, YOYOW is providing free open source services and will be continually iterating products and will be introducing an incentive mechanism. Each Q&A community can directly integrate into YOYOW's bottom layer network and enjoy the network services provided by YOYOW.
  • Add-on Recommended By Mozilla Caught Logging Users’ Browsing History
    According to the reports by Mike Kuketz, an independent security blogger from Germany and uBlock Origin, an add-on named “Web Security” has been caught collecting users’ browsing history. [...] Soon after this discovery by Hill, Kuketz added a post on his blog about the same extension pointing to the same strange behavior of the add-on. A user on Kuketz’s blog decoded the garbled data and found that the add-on was collecting users’ browsing history and sending it to a German server.
  • Zombies: Top 5 Open Source Vulnerabilities That Refuse To Die [Ed: Microsoft partner WhiteSource continues to stigmatise FOSS as a security nightmare, using bugs branded by other Microsoft partner for extra panic]
  • How a civic hacker used open data to halve tickets at Chicago's most confusing parking spot
    Matt Chapman used the Freedom of Information Act to get the City of Chicago's very mess parking ticket data; after enormous and heroic data normalization, Chapman was able to pinpoint one of the city's most confusing parking spots, between 1100-1166 N State St, which cycled between duty as a taxi-stand and a parking spot with a confusingly placed and semi-busted parking meter. After surveying the site and deducing the problem, Chapman contacted the alderman responsible for that stretch of North State Street, and, eight months later, the signage was cleaned up and made more intuitive. Followup data analysis showed that Chapman's work had halved the number of parking tickets issued on the spot, with 600-odd fewer tickets in the past 20 months, for a savings of $60,000 to Chicago motorists.
  • Bluespec, Inc. Releases a New Family of Open-Source RISC-V Processors
    Bluespec Inc. has released Piccolo, its first in a family of RISC-V open-source processors provided as a vehicle for open innovation in embedded systems. Piccolo is a 3-stage RV32IM processor whose small “footprint” is ideal for many IoT applications. The repository (https://github.com/bluespec/Piccolo) contains a royalty-free synthesizable Verilog core that can be easily integrated and deployed into an ASIC or FPGA. Bluespec, Inc. will actively maintain Piccolo. It also offers commercial-grade tools for the customization and verification of RISC-V cores. Configurations will be continually added to provide the full spectrum of embedded controller features. Companies or universities interested in contributing to the Piccolo project should contact Bluespec, Inc. (add contact – RISC-V open source support).

KDE Applications 18.08 Open-Source Software Suite Released, Here's What's New

Being in development for the past several months, KDE Applications 18.08 goes stable today and will hit the software repositories of various popular GNU/Linux distributions during the next few days. This is a major release and brings numerous new features and improvements across multiple apps, including Dolphin, Konsole, Gwenview, KMail, Akonadi, Cantor, Spectacle, and others. "We continuously work on improving the software included in our KDE Application series, and we hope you will find all the new enhancements and bug fixes useful," reads today's announcement. "More than 120 bugs have been resolved in applications including the Kontact Suite, Ark, Cantor, Dolphin, Gwenview, Kate, Konsole, Okular, Spectacle, Umbrello and more!" Read more

Security Leftovers

  • How to Protect Your PC From the Intel Foreshadow Flaws
  • AT&T Sued After SIM Hijacker Steals $24 Million in Customer's Cryptocurrency
    It has only taken a few years, but the press, public and law enforcement appear to finally be waking up to the problem of SIM hijacking. SIM hijacking (aka SIM swapping or a "port out scam") involves a hacker hijacking your phone number, porting it over to their own device (often with a wireless carrier employee's help), then taking control of your personal accounts. As we've been noting, the practice has heated up over the last few years, with countless wireless customers saying their entire identities were stolen after thieves ported their phone number to another carrier, then took over their private data. Sometimes this involves selling valuable Instagram account names for bitcoin; other times it involves clearing out the target's banking or cryptocurrency accounts. Case in point: California authorities recently brought the hammer down on one 20-year-old hacker, who had covertly ported more than 40 wireless user accounts, in the process stealing nearly $5 million in bitcoin. One of the problems at the core of this phenomenon is that hackers have either tricked or paid wireless carrier employees to aid in the hijacking, or in some instances appear to have direct access to (apparently) poorly-secured internal carrier systems. That has resulted in lawsuits against carriers like T-Mobile for not doing enough to police their own employees, the unauthorized access of their systems, or the protocols utilized to protect consumer accounts from this happening in the first place.
  • Voting Machine Vendors, Election Officials Continue To Look Ridiculous, As Kids Hack Voting Machines In Minutes
  • Security updates for Thursday