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KDE

KDE: Plasma Mobile and Qt Quick Controls

Filed under
KDE
  • How to emulate Plasma Mobile on your machine with qemu

    If you want to develop for Plasma Mobile, but you don’t have a Mobile device, it is useful to emulate a Plasma Mobile on your desktop or laptop. Earlier this was not documented and has been asked multiple times on how to achieve this.

    This blog post is intended to help install a Plasma Mobile on the qemu-x86.

  • Qt Quick Controls 2: Imagine Style

    Back in April we wrote about image-based styling for Qt Quick Controls 2. Since then, we have made good progress and nailed down some aspects that were still under consideration. We call the new style “Imagine”.

  • Are you ready for Qt Quick Controls 2.3?

    This blog post takes a brief look at some of the new features in Qt Quick Controls 2.3 released as part of Qt 5.10. See also New Features in Qt 5.10 for a more detailed list.

Samsung DeX will finally give life to the Linux smartphone

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Remember when Canonical was doing everything they could to bring convergence between the Linux desktop and the Ubuntu Phone? They worked tirelessly to make it happen, only to fall short of that goal. This effort was preceded by Ubuntu Edge—a smartphone that, by itself, would bridge the mobile device and the desktop. That failed as well, but the intent was the same.

For those that aren't familiar, the idea behind convergence is simple: Offer a single device that could serve as both a smartphone handset, and when connected to a monitor work as a standard desktop computer. The idea is quite brilliant and makes perfect sense. Especially when you remember how many people use a smartphone as their only means of either connecting to the world or productivity. With that number growing every year, the idea of convergence becomes even more important. Give them one device that could function in two very important ways.

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Also: Samsung Galaxy S8 Icon Theme for KDE Plasma

Qt 5.9.3 Released

Filed under
Development
KDE

I am pleased to inform that Qt 5.9.3 is released today. As a patch release Qt 5.9.3 does not add any new functionality, focus is in bug fixes and performance improvements.

Compared to Qt 5.9.2, the new Qt 5.9.3 contains over 100 bug fixes and in total more than 500 changes since Qt 5.9.2. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.9.3.

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Announcing Season of KDE 2018

Filed under
KDE

KDE Student Programs is pleased to announce the 2018 Season of KDE for those who want to participate in mentored projects that enhance KDE in some way.

Every year since 2013, KDE Student Programs has been running Season of KDE as a program similar to, but not quite the same as Google Summer of Code, offering an opportunity to everyone (not just students) to participate in both code and non-code projects that benefits the KDE ecosystem. In the past few years, SoK participants have not only contributed new application features but have also developed the KDE Continuous Integration System, statistical reports for developers, a web framework, ported KDE Applications, created documentation and lots and lots of other work.

For this year’s Season of KDE, we are shaking things up a bit and making a host of changes to the program.

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KDE: KDE Applications 17.12, Akademy 2018, KDE Binary Factory

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KDE
  • KDE Applications 17.12 Sees Some New KF5 Ports, Other Apps Dropped

    The beta of KDE Applications 17.12 is now available ahead of next month's official debut for this quarterly update to the collection of official KDE programs.

    As previously covered, 17.12 is the point where only Qt5 / KDE Frameworks 5 apps will be included and any programs depending upon the older Qt4/KDE4 components will be dropped.

  • Applications 17.12 Pre-Beta available for testing with KDE neon Developer Stable branch edition

    Please join us in testing 17.12 pre-beta of KDE applications!

  • Akademy 2018 - Vienna, Austria - 11-17 August

    Vienna Calling! This is not only a song by the famous austrian singer Falco, but could also the motto for next years Akademy.

    In 2018 Akademy will be held at the University of Technology (TU Wien) in Vienna, Austria, from Saturday 11th to Friday 17th August.

    The conference is expected to draw hundreds of attendees from the global KDE Community to discuss and plan the future of the Community and its technology. Many participants from the broad free and open source software community, local organizations and software companies will also attend.

    Akademy 2018 is being organized together with Fachschaft Informatik (FSINF). Apart from representing and counseling computer science students, they engage in diverse political topics e.g. FOSS, Privacy and social justice.

  • CI for Windows installer and macOS bundle generation: KDE Binary Factory

    For some time now the KDE community has had a separate Continuous Integration system running which repeatedly generates Windows installers and macOS app bundles (DMG) for a specific subset of KDE projects.

  • /

Kubuntu 17.10 review - Hello darkness my old friend

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
Ubuntu

This must be one of the worst Kubuntu releases I've tried in a long time. Part of the fault lies with the parent distro, and the heartless switch to Gnome, which just shows that the passion to making Ubuntu an important desktop player is gone. This is just inertia and apathy. Still, there's so much wrong with Kubuntu on its own that I feel like a total fool for investing my time in this effort. And it also proves that there is only one good release for every three, showing that distro teams are overstretched roughly by 300%. The whole fast-release bullshit is just the modern-era agile-crap nonsense. It helps no one. Shitty products serve no purpose. Being fast for the sake of it is like running head first into an industrial blender to have your outstretched arms finely chopped by spinning blades.

Kubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark makes me sad. Makes me angry. Zesty was one of the finest distros ever created. This is one of the worst. That makes no sense. How can it be? Where's the modicum of care and diligence to ensure this kind of stuff does not happen? Application crashes, kernel crashes, media bugs, weird artifacts. Horrible.

My suggestion is not to upgrade for now. And even then, the foundation of your sanity is shaken. Come the upgrade, you do not know what will happen. You're hostage to arbitrary code decisions. There's no peace and stability in the Linux desktop. You will always have to dread the update process, not knowing what will break next. That is the essence of amateurism. And I'm right there, advocating Plasma and Kubuntu like the biggest of fools in this universe. Anyway, for the sake of public sacrifice, I'll also check 17.10 in-vivo upgrades on other machines, but my expectations are low. Aardvark gets 4/10. Don't bother for now, give it six months for the bugs to be fixed before a new release erases the slate and the cycle of depression starts again.

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Also: First Look At Linux Mint 18.3 Sylvia Beta

KDE and GNOME News

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • KDevelop 5.2 Open-Source IDE Released with Improved C++, PHP and Python Support

    KDevelop, the well-known open-source and cross-platform IDE (Integrated Development Environment) for GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows operating system, has been updated recently to version 5.2.

    Almost half a year in the making, KDevelop 5.2 is a major release that introduces more analyzer plugins to the Analyzer menu entry implemented in the previous release, KDevelop 5.1. These include Heaptrack, a heap memory profiler for Linux apps written in C/C++ and Cppcheck, a popular static analyzer for the C++ programming language, which can be used from inside KDevelop by default.

  • Kubuntu Most Wanted

    Kubuntu Cafe Live, is our new community show. This new format show is styled using a magazine format. We created lots of space for community involvement, breaking the show into multiple segments, and we want to get you involved. We are looking for Presenters, Trainers, Writers and Hosts.

  • GNOME 3.27.2 RELEASED

    GNOME 3.27.2, the second unstable release in the 3.28 development cycle, is now available.

    The porting of more modules to meson continues (which is great!), but It's still causing some problems for some modules. See the build failures below, along with a short list of other build errors.

  • GNOME 3.27.2 Released: More Meson Porting, Nautilus Starring Files

    GNOME 3.27.2 is now available as the second development release in the road to next March's GNOME 3.28 desktop stable update.

  • Epiphany 3.27.2 Improves GNOME Web Apps, Firefox Sync

    Epiphany 3.27.2 is now available as the latest web browser release in the road to next year's GNOME 3.28 desktop.

    One of the big changes with this Epiphany browser development release is restructuring how "web apps" are handled. They are now treated more like "silos, rather than prisons." This bug report describes more of the reworking of these GNOME Web Apps. The updated implementation allows these web applications to support tabs, allowing external links, button changes, and more.

KaOS 2017.11

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Just days after Plasma 5.11.3, KDE Applications 17.08.3 and Frameworks 5.40.0 where announced can you already see these on this new release. Highlights of Plasma 5.11.3 include making sure passwords are stored for all users when kwallet is disabled, sync xwayland DPI font to wayland dpi, notifications optionally stores missed and expired notifications in a history, the new Plasma Vault offers strong encryption features presented in a user-friendly way, Window title logic has been unified between X and Wayland windows, default X font DPI to 96 on wayland. All built on Qt 5.9.2.

This release introduces Elisa as the default music player. KaOS users have chosen this option during a recent poll. It has been a few years, but the Juk music player is finally ported to kf5, thus available again in the KaOS repositories.

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Announcing KTechLab 0.40.0

Filed under
KDE

KTechLab, the IDE for microcontrollers and electronics, has reached a new milestone: its latest release, 0.40.0, does not depend on KDE3 and Qt3, but on KDE4 and Qt4. This means that KTechLab can be compiled and run on current operating systems.

In the new, KDE4 and Qt4 based release, practically all features of the previous version are kept. Circuits, including PIC microcontrollers can be simulated, the programs running on PICs can be edited in C, ASM format, or graphically, by using Flowcode, and these programs can be easily prepared for programming real PICs. The only feature which has been removed is DCOP integration, which is not available in KDE4, and should be replaced with D-Bus integration.

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Also: KTechLab Microcontroller/Electronics IDE Ported To KDE4/Qt4

Software: Papis, Cozy, OpenShot, NeuVector, Latte Dock and More

Filed under
KDE
Software
GNOME
  • Papis – A Command-line Based Document And Bibliography Manager

    A while ago, we wrote about Mendeley – an academic social network for researchers and educators. Using Mendeley, the researchers, lecturers, educators and librarians can connect with each other, share data, discuss ideas about their research, follow inspirational researchers around the world, collaborate and lots more. Today, we are going to discuss yet another useful tool for research scholars. Meet Papis, a powerful and highly extensible command-line based document and bibliography manager. Unlike Mendeley, Papis is not just for a particular research community but for every one who wants to manage their documents easily and effectively. Also, you can retain the full ownership to your data, because all data will be stored in your local drive.

  • Linux Audiobook Player ‘Cozy’ Adds Sleep Timer, m4a Support

    Cozy, the open-source audiobook player for Linux desktop, has a new version out. The app adds a sleep timer and improves the interface.

  • OpenShot 2.4.1 Released with Various Improvements

    A new version of the OpenShot video editor is available to download.

    OpenShot 2.4.1 follows a stability-focused release of the non-linear editor made back in September.

    Among the big changes OpenShot 2.4.1 features is improved image quality. You should now see sharper images in the preview window when editing thanks to an “improved image processing pipeline”.

    There’s also improved playback smoothness when working with high frame-rate videos at 50fps, 60fps, and 120fps.

  • NeuVector 1.3 Boosts Container Security with Improved Threat Detection

    Security startup NeuVector announced version 1.3 of its container security platform on Nov.13, providing advanced capabilities to help organizations detect threats that can be hidden in container workloads.

    NeuVector's platform provides a container firewall that can filter application layer traffic to help identify anomalous behavior and traffic. Among the new features in the NeuVector 1.3 release, is the ability to get visibility into tunnelled traffic, as well as advanced privilege escalation detection capabilities. NeuVector is also expanding its portfolio with an enhanced enterprise edition that provides additional capabilities.

  • Latte Dock v0.7.2 arrives in KDE and Kubuntu backports PPA

    Latte Dock, the very popular doc/panel app for Plasma Desktop, has released its new bugfix version 0.7.2. This is also the first stable release since Latte Dock became an official KDE project at the end of August.

  • Latte bug fix release v0.7.2

    Latte Dock v0.7.2 has been released containing many important fixes and improvements!

  • Interview with Lars Pontoppidan

    I’d like to thank everyone involved with Krita for making this great open source and free software available to the world. I hope to soon get enough time on my hands to help the project grow.

  • GNOME Shell 4 Proposal Published To Be More Wayland-Focused

    Jonas Adahl of Red Hat has volleyed his initial proposals for how a "future" GNOME Shell could be architected on a page entitled GNOME Shell 4. This GNOME Shell 4 would potentially break compatibility with GNOME Shell 3 extensions while being more designed around Wayland rather than X11.

    GNOME Shell 3 started out as an X11 compositing manager and has then been fitted for Wayland and other modern input/display features on Linux. With GNOME Shell 4, it would be more of a Wayland-first design and perhaps we could see it do away with X11/X.Org support entirely.

    The new GNOME Shell would be better fitted for low-latency input forwarding, low-latency visual input event feedback (namely pointer cursors), low-latency/zero-copy client forwarding, input methods within the shell UI, and eliminating stalls on the main compositor thread during frame redraws.

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More in Tux Machines

Systemd, Devuan, and Debian; FOSS at the Back End

  • Systemd, Devuan, and Debian
  • Devuan ASCII sprint -- 15-16-17 Dec. 2017
  • This open-source, multicloud serverless framework claims faster-than-bare-metal speed
    The move toward fast, serverless computing technology got a boost this month from Iguazio Systems Ltd. The data platform company (named from the Iguazu waterfalls in South America) announced the release of Nuclio, an open-source, multicloud serverless framework that claims faster-than-bare-metal speed. “We provide one platform, all the data services that Amazon has, or at least the ones that are interesting, serverless functions, which are 100 times faster, and a few more tricks that they don’t have,” said Yaron Haviv (pictured), founder and chief technology officer of Iguazio Systems. “We do fewer services, but each one kicks ass; each one is much faster and better engineered.”
  • CORD Says It’s the De Facto Choice for Edge Computing
    The Open Networking Foundation (ONF) today released 4.1 of its Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD) code. CORD has only been around as an independent project within ONF for about a year and a half, but with this release a couple of things have gelled for the project. First, it has merged its residential-CORD, mobile-CORD, and enterprise-CORD into one overarching project. Secondly, the ONF has realized CORD’s relevance in edge computing and edge cloud data centers.

Graphics: AMD, Mesa, VESA and More

  • AMD Moving Forward In Their RadeonSI Support For ARB_gl_spirv
    AMD open-source developer Nicolai Hähnle has spent the past few months working on the ARB_gl_spirv extension as mandated by OpenGL 4.6. Some of the prep work for supporting that extension has landed in Mesa 17.4-dev Git. ARB_gl_spirv is about bringing SPIR-V support to OpenGL drivers, the IR shared by Vulkan and OpenCL 2.1+. ARB_gl_spirv allows for loading SPIR-V modules into OpenGL programs and allows for GLSL to be a source language in creating SPIR-V modules. This is basically for creating better interoperability between OpenGL and Vulkan/SPIR-V.
  • Mesa Glthread Gets Adds Another Game, AMDGPU Winsys Gets Performance Workaround
    This week has started off to being another busy time in Mesa Git just ahead of the holidays. First up, Mount & Blade: Warband is the latest game to be white-listed by the Mesa glthread functionality for enabling OpenGL threading on this Steam Linux game. Mount & Blade: Warband was actually whitelisted back in July but then disabled a few days later as it turned out not to be working.
  • VESA Rolls Out DisplayHDR As Its Latest Standard
    VESA has rolled out DisplayHDR 1.0 as its newest standard. As implied by the name, the standard is in regards to specifying HDR (High Dynamic Range) quality for displays.
  • VC5 OpenGL & Vulkan Driver Advancing
    Broadcom developer Eric Anholt has offered an update on the state of the VC5 Gallium3D driver for OpenGL support as well as the work being done on the "BCMV" Vulkan driver. Additionally, the VC4 Gallium3D driver for existing Raspberry Pi devices continues to get better.
  • Initial Tessellation Shader Support For RadeonSI NIR
    The RadeonSI Gallium3D driver's NIR back-end is moving one step closer to feature parity with the existing OpenGL capabilities of this AMD GCN graphics driver. Timothy Arceri working for Valve has been focusing on the NIR back-end recently for RadeonSI. This NIR intermediate representation handling is being driven in order to add SPIR-V ingestion support to RadeonSI with code sharing for RADV's existing NIR-based infrastructure.

Games: Rocket League, Ultimate Trivia Challenge, Grass Cutter, Hyper Knights: Battles, Opus Magnum

If You're Ready for Arch, ArchMerge Eases the Way

Newcomer ArchMerge Linux offers a big change for the better to those switching from the Debian Linux lineage to the Arch Linux infrastructure. ArchMerge Linux is a recent spinoff of ArchLabs Linux. I recently reviewed Archlabs and found it to be a step up from most Arch Linux offerings in terms of installation and usability. Arch Linux distros, in general, are notorious for their challenging installation and software management processes. ArchMerge Linux brings a few extra ingredients that make trying it well worth your while if you want to consider migrating to the Arch Linux platform. Still, no Arch Linux distro is a suitable starting point for Linux newcomers. That reality does not change with ArchMerge, although it helps ease the process considerably for those who are ready for it. Read more