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KDE

Plasma 5.9.2, Applications 16.12.2 and Frameworks 5.31.0 available in Chakra

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KDE

The latest updates for KDE's Plasma, Applications and Frameworks series are now available to all Chakra users.

Included with this update, is an update of the ncurses, readline and gnutls related group of packages, as well as many other important updates in our core repository. Be aware that during this update, your screen might turn black. If that is the case and it does not automatically restore after some time, then please switch to tty3 with Ctrl+Alt+F3 and then switch back to the Plasma session with Ctrl+Alt+F7. If that does not work, please give enough time for the upgrade to complete before shutting down. You can check your cpu usage using 'top' after logging in within tty3. You can reboot within tty3 using 'shutdown --reboot'.

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Interview: Thomas Weissel Installing Plasma in Austrian Schools

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GNU
KDE
Linux

With Plasma 5 having reached maturity for widespread use we are starting to see rollouts of it in large environments. Dot News interviewed the admin behind one such rollout in Austrian schools.

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The State of Plasma

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KDE

Over the years, my experience with KDE can best be described as a rollercoaster – on ice, with rocket thrusters. KDE3.5 was a great release, followed by a somewhat mellow, emotionally curbed KDE4, which took years blossoming, and then when it finally gained solid form, it was replaced with KDE5, or rather, Plasma 5.

Since 2014, Plasma has kept me entertained and disappointed in equal measures. At some point, I had it crowned my favorite desktop, and then it went downhill steeply, fast, struggling to recover. Not helping was the slew of bugs and regressions across the distro space, which exacerbated the quality of Plasma and what it could show the world. Today, I would like to explore Plasma from a different angle. Not from the user perspective, but usability perspective. AKA Everything What Plasma Does. After me.

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KDE in Slackware, Cutelyst 1.4.0 Ready

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KDE
Slack
  • KDE 5_17.02 for Slackware-current is available

    I am happy to announce my February 2017 release of the ‘ktown’ packages: KDE 5_17.02. What you get in this new release is: KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, Plasma 5.9.2 and Applications 16.12.2. All built on top of Qt 5.7.1.
    Soon, I will compile this version of Plasma 5 on Slackware 14.2 (only 64bit) as well, but I gave priority last few days to the new LibreOffice packages and a new PLASMA5 Live image. The packages that I am releasing today are for Slackware-current only (both 32bit and 64bit). As stated in my previous post, I will no longer be releasing Plasma 5 packages for 32bit Slackware 14.2.

  • New Slackware PLASMA5 Live ISO (with Plasma 5.9)

    To conclude this week’s batch of updates in my repositories I have re-generated the ISO for PLASMA5 Slackware Live Edition – it is based on liveslak 1.1.6.2 and using Slackware-current dated “Mon Feb 13 06:21:22 UTC 2017“.

    If you already use PLASMA5 Live on a USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content.

  • Cutelyst 1.4.0 released, C100K ready.

    Thanks to the last batch of improvements and with the great help of jemalloc, cutelyst-wsgi can do 100k request per second using a single thread/process on my i5 CPU. Without the use of jemalloc the rate was around 85k req/s.

    This together with the EPoll event loop can really scale your web application, initially I thought that the option to replace the default glib (on Unix) event loop of Qt had no gain, but after increasing the connection number it handle them a lot better. With 256 connections the request per second using glib event loop get’s to 65k req/s while the EPoll one stays at 90k req/s a lot closer to the number when only 32 connections is tested.

KDE Applications 17.04 Schedule

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KDE
  • KDE Applications 17.04 Announced for April 20, Here's the Final Release Schedule

    KDE developer Albert Astals Cid announced that the release date of the upcoming KDE Applications 17.04 open-source software suite for KDE Plasma desktop environments, along with the final release schedule.

    We were just wondering when KDE Applications 17.04 will be released when the current KDE Applications 16.02 series received its second maintenance update, and we were right to believe at the point in time that the final release is coming in April, and, according to the release schedule, it looks like KDE Applications 17.04 lands April 20, 2017.

  • KDE Applications 17.04 To Be Released 20 April

    The release schedule for the upcoming KDE Applications 17.04 has been firmed up.

    The KDE Applications 17.04 release is scheduled to happen on 20 April. For that to happen, the planned dependency freeze is 16 March, the beta release on 23 March, KDE applications 17.04 Release Candidate on 6 April, and prepping for the actual 17.04 release beginning on 13 April.

KDE and Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.9.2 Desktop Rolls Out on Valentine's Day with Multiple Bug Fixes

    It's Valentine's Day, and to celebrate this important event, the KDE developers demonstrate their love for KDE Plasma users by bringing them a new maintenance update for the KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop environment.

    Yes, we're talking about KDE Plasma 5.9.2, the second point release to the latest KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop, which launched just two weeks ago for various GNU/Linux distributions, including KDE Neon and Arch Linux. Because of the new, fast release cycle, you see this new version just one week after the first update, namely KDE Plasma 5.9.1.

  • An Early Qt 5.9 Alpha Snapshot: Qt 5.9 Packing A Ton Of Features

    While Qt 5.8 was released less than one month ago, the Qt 5.9 Alpha release is on approach for landing.

    Jani Heikkinen today announced the first Qt 5.9 Alpha snapshot. This isn't the formal Qt 5.9 Alpha release, but will become the official Alpha source package if there isn't anything important that's missing. Hit up that mailing list link if you are interested in testing.

  • First Qt 5.9 alpha snapshot available
  • KDE's Plasma Discover Package Manager to Support Flatpak Packages and Repos

    It looks to us like Flatpak, the open-source application sandboxing and distribution framework for GNU/Linux systems is on its way to becoming the norm on most distributions.

    Not only that GNOME Software offers support for Flatpak runtimes, but it appears that KDE's Plasma Discover graphical package manager will do too, as KDE developer Jan Grulich reports today on the upcoming availability of a Flatpak backend to implement support for handling Flatpak packages and repositories in the app.

  • KDE Discover flatpak backend

    As some of you might already know, I’ve been focusing lately on Flatpak and its integration into KDE. You can check my work on Flatpak KDE portals, which are being currently included in our KDE runtimes and repositories were migrated to KDE git so there has been made some progress since last time I talked about them. Recently I started looking into adding Flatpak support to KDE Discover, to have same support for Flatpak as Gnome has with gnome-software. From the begining it was a nightmare for me as I have never used any glib based library so that slowed me down little bit. I also went through gnome-software code to understand how flatpak integration is done there to get some inspiration. Things went well since then and I have already quite nice stuff to share with you. We currently support most common functionality, like listing available/installed flatpak applications in Discover with possibilities to install/remove/update and of course launch them. We also support flatpak bundles and flatpakref files already.

Qt 5.5.1-2 for Wind River® VxWorks® Real-Time Operating System Released

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KDE

The Qt 5.5.1-2 release for VxWorks Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) release supports the new VxWorks 7 release SR 0480 (September 2016) on ARM-v7 with updates in the Qt Base, Qt Declarative and Qt Quick Controls modules. For full list of changes, please see the change log.

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Review: KDE neon 5.9.1

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KDE
Reviews

It has been a while since I've done a review of a Linux distribution. Lately, I've seen a few reviews of KDE neon (the second word being intentionally written in lowercase), and some of them have praised it as being much better than Kubuntu (the traditionally KDE spin of Ubuntu). That got my attention, so I figured I should check it out.

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Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.9.1 - Here is the First Bugfix Release
  • How to Activate the Global Menu in Kde Plasma 5.9
  • Kde Plasma 5.9 is Finally Available in Arch Linux

    As an Arch Linux and Kde lover, I’m pleased to let you know that the new Kde Plasma 5.9 is finally available into the stable repository.

  • A Short KDE Plasma 5.9 Review in February 2017

    The KDE Network Manager settings got a new look. Surprise for VPN users, now you have a beautiful & user-friendly VPN client in KDE built-in.

  • Concept X for Plasma Mobile

    This week the Plasma team is sprinting and maybe the time to discuss Plasma Mobile’s UI is coming! Andrea Del Sarto and me didn’t join the sprint this year, but we wanted to contribute with our ideas, trying to inspire future works

  • KDE at FOSDEM and Plasma Sprint 2017 Pics

    We’ve had a busy weekend at FOSDEM in Brussels for the last two days and now I’ve travelled into my fifth country of the trip picking up a few hackers on the way for the KDE Plasma Sprint which is happening all this week in Stuttgart, do drop by if you’re in town.

  • Made with Krita 2016: The Artbooks Have Arrived!

    Made With Krita 2016 is now available! This morning the printer delivered 250 copies of the first book filled with art created in Krita by great artists from all around the world. We immediately set to work to send out all pre-orders, including the ones that were a kickstarter reward.

  • Native look and feel

    We know that many Qt users want controls styled with a native look-and-feel. But offering that on platforms with no public styling API, is hard. A classic approach is to take snapshots of the native controls, tweak them, and use them as foreground or background in our own controls. Which is somewhat OK for static appearances. But when animations and transitions are involved, static pixmaps will only take you half the way. And since an OS can change style from one update to the next, taking snapshots runtime is risky. Using pre-grabbed snapshots is also something we don’t do because of legal considerations.

  • Glowing Qt Charts

    Have you ever had the need to visualize data graphically and add some ‘wow’-effect to it? I’m currently helping out with the development of a demo application, where we have some charts to visualize data received from sensors. Naturally, the designer wants the charts to be visually appealing.

  • Plasma Sprint: KDE neon Docker Images Now Support Wayland

    The KDE neon Docker Images are the easiest and fastest way to test out KDE software from a different branch than your host system.

    Coming live from the Plasma Sprint sponsored by Affenfels here in Stuttgart, the KDE neon Docker images now support Wayland. This runs on both X and Wayland host systems. Instructions on the wiki page.

  • Does KDE.org look funny to you?

    Our stalwart KDE homepage, which has been with us for several years, has, after serving us well, finally been retired.

    The new KDE.org homepage, using the new theme “Aether”, is only the first step of a much longer journey to unify the disparate KDE websites. KDE.org and its surrounding network is made of many parts: forums, wikis, feed aggregates, custom solutions, etc; beyond the homepage each of these will need to be updated. It will be a long road, but the modernization is due.

  • Wallpaper, Wallpapers, Website!
  • Plasma Vault is evolving

    While the rest of the Plasma team is sprinting in Germany, I’m unfortunately tied down to my chair at home and trying to sprint as well.

  • Kanboard to Phabricator

    A while ago KDE migrated our todo management from Kanboard to Phabricator to reduce the amount of software our System Administrators have to manage and maintain. In KDE neon we did this move already ahead of time so I happened to have a primitive migration script at hand, ultimately making me the person to auto migrate everyone’s todos.

  • FOSDEM 2017 & the QtWayland Compositor Framework

    This will be a rather short blog post but since I completely missed to making it before this year’s FOSDEM, just let me give you a short hint to my current talk: This year, for the first time, I submitted a talk to the Embedded & Automotive DevRoom. If you think that this sounds crazy, actually, what we see on modern embedded devices, like in cars or in even bigger machines, this tends gain a similar complexity like the good old Linux desktop environments. In terms of multiple processes, window compositing and UI requirements, a lot of such demands are already on the table…

Kdenlive 16.12.2 released

Filed under
KDE

The second maintenance release of the 16.12 series is out, part of KDE Applications 16.12.2.

This release fixes startup crashes with some graphic cards, as well as some fixes to MOVIT (GPU effect processing) and minor stability issues. The Appimage version as well as our PPA’s were updated, check our download section for instructions. An updated Windows version will be released in the next days. This is a relatively small update since all our efforts are currently focused on the timeline refactoring branch which will bring professional grade new features and more stability. Stay tuned for more news!

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Fedora + Plasma + Unity, Design Interns, and New ISO Build

  • Fedora + Plasma + Unity = Nice looks?
    Hybrid things aren't usually the best option around. Like hybrid cars, for example. Technically, when you marry concepts, you change the energy state, and while this could make sense in that you blend the best of several worlds, when this is done in a forced manner over a short period of time rather than eons of evolution, you end with the worst bits as the product of your mutation. I read about the United theme for Plasma a few months ago, and given that I've spent a fair deal of time fiddling with themes and icons and fonts and making different desktop environments look prettier than their defaults, I was intrigued. So I decided to see whether the notion of having Plasma look like Unity is a sane option. Let us.  Fedora + Plasma + Unity = Nice looks? [...] What is thy point, Vanessa, the astute among you may ask? Well, I have nothing against United or its creators, but I did come to the conclusion that too much tweaking is worse than no tweaking, if this statement makes sense. I like the notion of trying to overcome the inherent problems in each desktop through the use of themes and extensions. After all, I've been doing that profusely for the past few months. But it gets undone when you cross the desktop environment space. Making Gnome better yes. Making Plasma better, absolutely. Unity as an overlay for Plasma, well tricky. There's too much disparity for you to be able to hide the underlying workflow mechanisms and UI philosophies. Then, every little inconsistency glares. You notice things you do not expect, and you get angry because there are certain things you do expect. Some transformations work quite well because they build on the foundations, e.g. various Gnome panels or Macbuntu. But Plasma has its own special charm and flow and making it into a weird version of Unity, which itself is a weird version of Gnome misses the bigger picture. And so, if you're asking me, Plasma and Unity are two separate worlds, best enjoyed in isolation. United is an interesting notion, but it also signifies the upper limit for my own wild ideas and tweaking. Yes, you can make it work, then again, it means taking away from the beauty and style of what these two desktops do, and that's not the purpose of my pimping guides. So we shall stop here, and explore other colors and shapes. Have fun, little penguins.
  • Fedora Design Interns 2017
    Here’s an update on internships. Older post linked to here. Quick recap: there’s been 2 long-term interns for Fedora design team since February, and one short-term guy, who came for 2 weeks at the beginning of June. Guys have been doing an amazing job, I can’t stress enough how happy I am to have them around.
  • F26-20170815 Updated ISOs released

today's howtos

Security: Hardware Back Doors, Microsoft Windows, Kronos

  • Hiding malware in boobytrapped replacement screens would undetectably compromise your mobile device
     

    On the one hand, if you let an untrusted stranger install hardware in your electronic device, you're opening yourself up to all kinds of potential mischief; on the other hand, an estimated one in five smartphones has a cracked screen and the easiest, most efficient and cheapest way to get that fixed is to go to your corner repair-shop.  

  • How hackers {sic} are targeting the shipping industry [iophk: "Microsoft TCO"]
     

    Whenever one of the firm's fuel suppliers would send an email asking for payment, the virus simply changed the text of the message before it was read, adding a different bank account number.  

  • Locky ransomware is back from the dead with two new strains [iophk: "Windows TCO"]
     

    What hasn't changed, though, is the method of distribution.Rather than rifling through the trove of spilt US National Security Agency exploits, as the groups behind WannaCry and NotPetya did, Locky is distributed via phishing emails containing malicious Microsoft Office files or zipped attachments containing a malicious script.

  • Connected cars could have an airbag problem
     

    "It's not the car manufacturers' fault, and it's not a problem introduced by them. The security issue that we leveraged in our research lies in the standard that specifies how the car device network (i.e., CAN) works," added Trend.

    [...] To eliminate the risk entirely, an updated CAN standard should be proposed, adopted, and implemented. This whole process would likely require another generation of vehicles."

  • Code chunk in Kronos malware used long before MalwareTech published it
    A chunk of code found in the Kronos bank-fraud malware originated more than six years before security researcher Marcus Hutchins is accused of developing the underlying code, a fellow security researcher said Friday. The conclusion, reached in an analysis of Kronos published by security firm Malwarebytes, by no means proves or disproves federal prosecutors' allegations that Hutchins wrote Kronos code and played a role in the sale of the malware. It does, however, clarify speculation over a Tweet from January 2015, in which MalwareTech—the online handle Hutchins used—complained that a complex piece of code he had published a month earlier had been added to an unnamed malware sample without his permission.
  • Secret chips in replacement parts can completely hijack your phone’s security
    People with cracked touch screens or similar smartphone maladies have a new headache to consider: the possibility the replacement parts installed by repair shops contain secret hardware that completely hijacks the security of the device. The concern arises from research that shows how replacement screens—one put into a Huawei Nexus 6P and the other into an LG G Pad 7.0—can be used to surreptitiously log keyboard input and patterns, install malicious apps, and take pictures and e-mail them to the attacker. The booby-trapped screens also exploited operating system vulnerabilities that bypassed key security protections built into the phones. The malicious parts cost less than $10 and could easily be mass-produced. Most chilling of all, to most people, the booby-trapped parts could be indistinguishable from legitimate ones, a trait that could leave many service technicians unaware of the maliciousness. There would be no sign of tampering unless someone with a background in hardware disassembled the repaired phone and inspected it.

Ubuntu: Themes and Icons, MAAS, Podcast and More

  • Some interesting Ubuntu themes and icons
    Well, I guess there isn't much to say. If you like the stock looks, ignore this article. If you find the defaults not colorful or fun enough, or you just plain like tweaking, then you might want to consider some of the stuff I've outlined here. My taste is subjective, of course, but then, I aim for simple, clean designs and pleasing art work. Overall, you have a plenty of good options here. More icons than themes. Vimix or Arc seem like neat choices for the latter, and among the sea of icons, Moka, Numix and Uniform seem to do a great job. And of course, Macbuntu. I wish there were more monochrome or accented icons, but that's something I still haven't found. Anyhow, I hope you like this silly little piece. If you have suggestions, please send them, just remember my aesthetics criteria - simplicity of installation, clean lines, no gradients, no bugs. That would be all for today, fellas.
  • 7 of the Best Icon Themes for Ubuntu
    On a hunt to find the best icon themes for Ubuntu? Well, you’ve come to the right post place! In this post we will show you some of the best icon themes for Ubuntu, ranging from modern, flat icon sets, to a circular icon pack carrying a colourful twist. Oh, and as this article is constantly updated you don’t need to fret about any of the links or information being out of date. Feel free to bookmark this list for future reference, or share it on social media.
  • MAAS Development Summary – August 18th, 2017
  • S10E24 – Fierce Hurried Start
  • conjure-up dev summary: aws native integration, vsphere <3, and ADDONS