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KDE

KDE Notes and Blurbs

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KDE

KDE Leftovers

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KDE
  • Too much of a good thing

    Then, since April, Krita-wise, there was the Kickstarter, the kick-off for the artbook, the Krita 3.0 release... The 3.0 release doubled the flow of bugs, donations, comments, mails to the foundation, questions on irc, reddit, forum and everywhere else. (There's this guy who has sent me over fifty mails asking for Krita to be released for Windows XP, OSX 10.5 and Ubuntu 12.02, for example). And Google Summer of Code kicked off, with three students working on Krita.

  • No 3.0.1 Release This Week

    The Krita release process still depends completely on one person making the Windows, Linux and OSX builds — me, Boudewijn. And I’ve been out of action for a week and a half now, so I couldn’t make those builds. Since I need some more time to recover and pick up all the threads and todo’s, we decided to move to a new release schedule, skipping the planned 3.0.1 release.

  • Why does kwin_wayland not start?
  • LabPlot: Theme Manager – Themes Context Menu & a new Theme “Dark”
  • Animating auto-hiding panels
  • Just So Many Things To Write
  • widget optimization in plasma 5.7

    Check all default widgets about there layout and sizing. So start playing with widgets and say us what we did right and what we should fix.

Get the Look of KDE Plasma 5 on Your GNOME Desktop

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KDE
GNOME
HowTos

The airy aesthetics have won Plasma 5 an army of admirers, and helped to cement the new visual impression of the KDE desktop experience redux.

But what if you’re not using KDE? Well, you don’t have to miss out.

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KDE Applications 16.04.3 Is the Last in the Series, Out Now for KDE Plasma 5.7.1

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KDE
Software

After announcing the availability of the first maintenance update for the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment, KDE also released today the third and last point release for the KDE Applications 16.04 software suite.

KDE Applications 16.04.3 is here to fix twenty more bugs reported by users since last month's KDE Applications 16.04.2 point release, bringing improvements to various KDE applications that are usually shipped by default with any new installation of the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

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KDE Plasma 5.7.1 Improves Microphone Volume Actions, Adds Plasma Workspace Fixes

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KDE

Today, July 12, 2016, the KDE project has announced the general availability of the first point release for the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment, bringing multiple fixes and improvements.

The KDE Plasma 5.7 release is the most advanced version of the acclaimed desktop environment used by many GNU/Linux operating systems by default for their users, but this doesn't mean that it's perfect, and bug reports are submitted every single day.

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Multi-screen woes in Plasma 5.7

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KDE

With Plasma 5.7 we promised improved multi-screen support. While we achieved that, some users are still experiencing issues. This is unfortunate and our users have all the reasons to be disappointed with us. We are working very hard to fix the issues which have been reported to us since the release.

But there are many situations where users blame us for issues not under our control. With this blog post I want to describe some of the problems we got reported and explain them.

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Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • Discovering the Kube project

    From what I understand Kube is entirely developed with Qt, reuses some parts of Kontact, the standard KDE/Plasma groupware client relies on the next version of Akonadi (this data & authentification backend from KDE) while being truly multiplatform (Windows Linux, OSX, Android and iOS). You can give it an early try by following the instructions listed here.

  • New Alpha Version of Marble Maps for Android

    We have a new alpha release of Marble Maps in the Google Play store! It is available to registered alpha testers. We would like to gather feedback on the new turn-by-turn navigation mode before releasing a new public beta version in two weeks. See our release schedule for more details.

    Sanjiban and me worked a lot on polishing the turn-by-turn navigation mode lately. It can be activated after calculating a route. During turn-by-turn navigation the map follows your current position and upcoming turns are announced using text-to-speech

KDE Plasma – Ultimate Desktop Environment For Linux

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KDE

You never need to compromise on anything, when using a Linux desktop. That is the whole idea behind the innovative and advanced desktop environment for Linux. KDE is developed to be a free libre software and a plasma desktop environment to be run on Linux and Windows environments. The KDE community has went a long way to create a free environment for daily users to meet their regular computing needs, as well as providing the developers of the system with ultimate solutions to enhance and enrich the software to a great extent.

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KDE Frameworks 5.24.0

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KDE

Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • [Dolphin] Checksums made easy

    Adding checksums to the Dolphin’s Properties dialog is something that has been on my TODO list for a while. I always try to verify the integrity of what I manually download from the Internet (and you should too). Yet, tools such as md5sum, sha1sum and friends are annoying to use (though not as annoying as checking GPG signatures), even for those who are familiar with the command line.

  • A new name, the rise of ${YourChoice}
  • What happened to Kate in Randa?

    This years topic for the Randa meeting, was multi-platform end-user application development. That was a golden opportunity to work on the Windows and Mac versions.

  • The Developers Conference and Br-Print3D
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More in Tux Machines

FOSS in the European Union

  • Competition authorities first to implement DMS services
    The DRS are published as open source software using the European Union’s open source software licence EUPL, and are available on Joinup. The software provides connectors for most commonly-used document management systems, and includes scripts to create a database to implement the connecting web services.
  • Czech Republic is at the forefront of an open data international project
    With the beginning of the new year, an international project “Open crowdsourcing data related to the quality of service of high-speed Internet” was launched, which aims to encourage the development of open data in the user’s measurement of high-speed Internet.

Arch Linux News

  • Linux Top 3: Arch Anywhere, Bitkey and Vinux
    Arch Linux is a powerful rolling Linux distribution, that hasn't always been particularly easy for new users to install and deploy. The goal of the Arch Anywhere system is to provide new and old users with the ability to install a fully custom Arch Linux system in minutes.
  • Arch Linux Preparing To Deprecate i686 Support
    Arch Linux is moving ahead with preparing to deprecate i686 (x86 32-bit) support in their distribution. Due to declining usage of Arch Linux i686, they will be phasing out official support for the architecture. Next month's ISO spin will be the last for offering a 32-bit Arch Linux install. Following that will be a nine month deprecation period where i686 packages will still see updates.
  • News draft for i686 deprecation
    Finally found some time to write a draft for news post on i686. Here it is: Title: i686 is dead, long live i686 Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that February ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Arch Linux. The next 9 months are deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging and repository tools will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported. However, as there is still some interest in keeping i686 alive, we would like to encourage the community to make it happen with our guidance. Depending on the demand, an official channel and mailing list will be created for second tier architectures.

LinuxCon Europe on 100G Networking

  • The World of 100G Networking
    Capacity and speed requirements keep increasing for networking, but going from where are now to 100G networking isn’t a trivial matter, as Christopher Lameter and Fernando Garcia discussed recently in their LinuxCon Europe talk about the world of 100G networking. It may not be easy, but with recently developed machine learning algorithms combined with new, more powerful servers, the idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective.
  • The World of 100G Networking by Christoph Lameter
    The idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective. This talk gives an overview about the competing technologies in terms of technological differences and capabilities and then discusses the challenges of using various kernel interfaces to communicate at these high speeds.

Development News

  • Oh, the things Vim could teach Silicon Valley's code slingers
    Vim text editor turned 25 late last year – the first public iteration was launched on November 2, 1991, a couple of weeks after Linus Torvalds announced Linux. To celebrate Vim's anniversary, creator Bram Moolenaar recently dropped version 8.0. Ordinarily the update of a text editor wouldn't be worth mentioning, but this is the first major Vim release in ten years. In today's world, where web browsers drop major point updates (what they consider major, anyway) several times a year, Vim's lack of major updates is not just refreshing, but speaks of an entirely different approach to developing software. Even leaving aside the absurd version system of today's web browsers, eight releases in 25 years would be considered slow by today's software development standards. Interestingly, though, Vim's biggest rival, GNU Emacs, has a roughly similar development pace. GNU Emacs began life in the 1970s and is currently at version 25, which means it averages two releases to Vim's one, but still definitely on the slow side.
  • Learn to code site Code.org loses student work due to index bug
    Learn-to-code site Code.org is apologising to its students after being caught by a database table maxing out, and dropping progress for an unknown number of participants. In its mea-culpa blog post, the group says it was burned by a database table with a 32-bit index.
  • GCC 7.0 Lands The BRIG Frontend For AMD's HSA
    GCC 7 moved on to only bug/documentation fixes but an exception was granted to allow the BRIG front-end to land for AMD's HSA support in this year's GNU Compiler Collection update. As of this morning, the BRIG front-end has merged. BRIG is the binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). This BRING front-end also brings the libhsail-rt run-time into GCC. So far BRIG in GCC has just been tested on Linux x86_64.