Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

KDE Needs Help (Dot and Krita), SoK, and KMail User Survey

Filed under
KDE
  • More KDE Twits

    I also stepped down from Dot and KDE promo stuff after getting burnt out from doing it for many years hoping others would fill in which I hope they now will.

  • Krita Foundation in Trouble

    Even while we’re working on a new beta for Krita 3.2 and a new development build for 4.0 (with Python, on Windows!), we have to release some bad news as well.

    The Krita Foundation is having trouble with the Dutch tax authorities. This is the situation:

    In February, we received an audit from the tax inspector. We were quite confident we wouldn’t have any problems because when we setup the Krita Foundation in 2013, we took the advice of a local tax consultant on how to setup the Foundation and its administration. We registered for VAT with the tax authorities and kept our books as instructed by the consultant.

    However, the tax inspector found two problems springing from the fact the Foundation sells training videos and books, so it is not 100% funded by donations. This means that the tax authorities see the Foundation is as partly a company, partly as not a company.

  • SoK journey so far
  • KMail User Survey

    Do you use KMail or Kontact? The KDE PIM developers want to get more knowledge about how KMail is used so they can better know where they should focus and how they should evolve Kmail and Kontact. They want to make the best user experience possible and you can help by filling out a short survey.

  • KMail User Survey Asks Which Features Need improvement

    Do you use Kmail, the KDE email client? If so be sure to add make your feedback on heard by taking the short Kmail user survey.

GNOME and KDE: Recipes, GUADEC, and Latte dock

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Recipes turns one year old

    I’ve given a presentation today and explained that recipes turns one year old at this GUADEC in Manchester. That is of course nothing compared to GNOME, which turned 20, so we send our congratulations:

  • My talk at GUADEC 2017

    Thanks so much to the GNOME Foundation for its support to the events I do to spread the GNOME word in my local community in Peru. I have had the opportunity to share my work done in 2016 and 2017 at GUADEC 2017.

  • [Video] Latte dock - different layouts per activities

KDE: Akademy 2017, Cutelyst 1.8.0, KDE PIM, LabPlot, and Policy Updates

Filed under
KDE
  • Akademy 2017 in Almería, Spain: Wrap-up

    Akademy, KDE’s annual developer conference, is over — and as always, it was a great experience! Thanks a lot to the local organization team, and of course to all the nice people attending and discussing things.

  • Cutelyst 1.8.0 released

    Cutelyst the Qt Web Framework, has another stable release, this release is mostly filled with bug fixes, the commit log is rather small.

    It got fixes on Cutelyst-WSGI to properly work on Windows, QtCreator integration fixes, properly installing dll’s on Windows, fix returning the right status from views (this allows you to know if for example View::Email sent the email with success).

  • KDE PIM on Akademy

    Me and Volker sat down and went through all KDE PIM wikipages on community.kde.org, userbase.kde.org and techbase.kde.org. Most of our wiki pages are horribly outdated, so we tried to clean them up, remove pages that are no longer relevant or useful. With fewer pages to take care of and better overview of what all content we have, we should be able to keep them more up-to-date than we did in the past years.

    [...]

    We will be meeting soon again in Randa. Our main plan for the sprint is to continue with removal of KDateTime from our code, and thus making KDE PIM free of kdelibs4support.

  • Live data features alive in LabPlot

    Hey guys. It's been a while since my last post here, but we did a good job meanwhile. Beside implementing the features I have described in my previous post I have implemented some other useful features/additional options. Let's see what we have here.

  • A new Beginning
  • GSoC Second phase analysis

    The month took a rough start with me getting ill from the very start of the month. I decided to get the relatively “easy” job done within the first month, so that I can fully focus on the topics that require much more concentration once I start recovering. I started out by refactoring the code and using nodeWidth and nodeHeight and keeping the same generation node within the same vertical level. Also, I made sure that the changes get reflected with change in the dimensions of the activity.

  • Policy Updates

    KDE is getting good at writing statements on visions  and missions and values which define who we are. But less sexy and more technical is our various policies some of which are getting out of date.  Pleasingly at Akademy we’ve been able to update two of these policies to comply with current practices and define our activities better.

    Application Lifecycle policy defines how projects get into KDE and how they die.  The new version adds in Incubator our method of bringing projects into KDE from elsewhere. It also says what is allowed to be done with Playground projects, you can make an alpha release but if you want to make a beta or final release it should go through kdereview.

Qt/KDE: QML vs. HTML5, Kalendar, Sway 0.14 Supports KDE Server Decorations Protocol,

Filed under
KDE
  • QML vs. HTML5

    Mobile devices have set the standard in terms of responsiveness and user-friendliness for HMIs across industries. Manufacturers of cars, medical equipment, industrial automation systems and consumer electronics now want to replicate this great user experience for their embedded devices. To find out which technology strategy we should select we set up a test where one of our developers was allocated 160 hours to create a demo application of an embedded system using Qt & QML and same number of hours to create the very equivalent application using HTML5.

  • Qt QML Is Better Than HTML5 For User Interfaces?

    Get the popcorn ready as this should be an interesting discussion item: is using Qt QML better than HTML5 when designing user-interfaces?

    Engineering firm Sequality believes Qt QML is better than HTML5 when designing user-interfaces for embedded devices and have published some of their findings in a post entitled Qt vs. HTML5.

    Right now they are referring to Qt being better than HTML5 for embedded/mobile, but if this is from the same trashed PR messages from a few days ago representing this independent firm, they seem to have their sights wider than that in the long run.

  • Kalendar – A Minimal Calendar App for Efficient Time Management

    Kalendar is a cross-platform Gregorian calendar application with a focus on simplicity, ease of use, and KDE desktop. It is written in C++ and has its GUI built with the Qt5 library.

    The project was started from scratch by echo-devim who after being inspired by gnome-calendar, aims to keep the app simple in order to avoid “annoying dependencies (so you can easily install it everywhere)”.

    It features a simple UI geared towards intuitive event management and TODOs. You can add events by clicking once on a date and right-clicking to delete.

  • Sway 0.14 Supports KDE Server Decorations Protocol, Mouse Button Bindings

    Sway 0.14 is now available as the latest release of this i3-compatible Wayland compositor that's quite popular among Linux enthusiasts who are fans of the i3 tiling window manager.

Kubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) Alpha 2

Filed under
KDE

Artful Aardvark (17.10) Alpha 2 images are now available for testing.

The Kubuntu team will be releasing 17.10 in October.

This is the first spin in preparation for the Alpha 2 pre-release. Kubuntu Alpha pre-releases are NOT recommended for:

Regular users who are not aware of pre-release issues
Anyone who needs a stable system
Anyone uncomfortable running a possibly frequently broken system
Anyone in a production environment with data or workflows that need to be reliable

Read more

Also: Lubuntu Artful Aardvark Alpha 2 has been released!

Ubuntu Flavors Roll Out Their Artful 17.10 Alpha 2 Releases

Akademy and KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Akademy 2017 -- Day 2

    Sunday was busy day and the talks were as varied as the speakers.

    Antonio Larrosa kicked off the morning with his talk on The KDE Community and its Ecosystem. He expressed concern about what he perceived as an increase in the isolation of certain communities and laid out the advantages of working on intra-community relationships.

    Later on in the day, Kevin Ottens gave his audience a taste of what Qt's 3D API can do in his talk Advances in Qt 3D. There are more and more applications that rely on 3D everyday, especially with the increase in popularity of virtual reality. Ottens introduced the tools Qt developers looking to include 3D into their programs and even treated attendees to a preview of a feature that is still in the works and that helps manage shader code.

  • Tuesday Akademy Wrapup Session

    The second day of Akademy BoFs, group sessions and hacking has just finished. There is a wrapup session at the end so that what happened in the different rooms can be shared with everyone including those not present.

  • Wednesday Akademy BoF wrapup

    Wednesday is the third and for many people last day of BoFs, as people start to head off home. However hacking and some smaller meetings will happen tomorrow between those still here

  • KDE Developers Envision KDE Plasma as a Durable, Usable, and Elegant Desktop UI

    KDE developer Sebastian Kügler today shared the project's vision on the KDE Plasma desktop environment, and what they are aiming for in the coming months and years.

    We all know that KDE Plasma transformed lately into a powerful, modern, and not so resource hungry desktop environment, and it's currently being used by default in many popular GNU/Linux distributions, including openSUSE Leap, Chakra GNU/Linux, and KaOS.

KDE: Plasma, Qt, Akademy, KStars 2.8.0, KDevelop

Filed under
KDE

Plasma's Vision

Filed under
KDE

Over the past weeks, KDE’s Plasma team have distilled the reasons why they do what they do, and what they want to achieve into a vision statement.

Read more

KDE/Qt: Akademy Awards, Plasma Mobile, KDE Slimbook, clazy 1.2 and WikiToLearn

Filed under
KDE
  • Akademy Awards 2017

    Every year at Akademy we celebrate some of our hardest working achievers in the community. The prizes are selected and awarded by the previous year's winners.

  • Plasma Mobile on Show at Akademy 2017

    Plasma Mobile, the convergent KDE smartphone OS, is on show at the annual Akademy summit for KDE developers and enthusiasts.

  • KDE Slimbook and FreeBSD

    Yesterday I picked up my new KDE Slimbook. It comes with KDE Neon pre-installed. Of course it also works well with openSUSE, and Manjaro, and Netrunner Linux (some things I’ve at least booted the Live CD for). But for me, “will it run FreeBSD” is actually the most important bit.

    Yes. Yes it does, and it does so beautifully.

  • clazy 1.2 released

    In the previous episode we presented how to uncover 32 Qt best practices at compile time with clazy. Today it’s time to show 5 more and other new goodies present in the freshly released clazy v1.2.

  • KDAB Releases Clazy 1.2 With Improvements For Qt Static Analysis

    With Akademy 2017 happening this week, Qt consulting firm KDAB has released version 1.2 of Clazy, its Clang-based static analyzer geared for showing Qt coding mistakes and inefficiencies.

    Clazy 1.2 picks up support for a number of new checks, clazy-standalone that works similarly to clang-tidy, support for the AST Matchers API, pre-built Windows binaries, and other improvements.

  • Wiki, what’s going on? (Part 24-Badges and books)

    We never forget where we belong: that’s why we remind you that during this week Akademy2017 is taking place in Almeria! Akademy is the annual conference of the KDE community. WikiToLearn was born under the KDE umbrella and still today we fell part of the KDE family. This year WikiToLearn is represented at Akademy by Vasudha, a GSoC student of ours working on Ruqola. Today we remember Akademy with extreme pleasure: two years ago, during Akademy2015 our project was officially born!

GSoC/KDE Developments

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • Fifth Blog Gsoc 2017

    The last month was not easy. Some things had to be re-written because they were not very well written. For example, I wrote a system of “sensors”, the logic of which was laid in the destructors of objects. This is a non-obvious logic of work, it had to be rewritten.

  • Polkit Support in KIO - Progess so far

    In this post I intend to report the whereabouts of my project. First of all me not posting any updates about my project was due to two problems that showed up when I was two weeks into the coding period. One, which I had anticipated, was to decide from where to show a warning dialog during the brief period of time when privileges are elevated. The problem was that showing the prompt from KIO::Slave resulted in repetition and to show it from KIO::JobUiDelegate permissions of destination folder was needed beforehand which required additional computation. So for this I decided to add a signal in KIO::Slave and all the necessary code for additional prompts in KIO::Job. This way the KIO slave emits the signal whenever it encounters ACCESS DENIED error and then job decides whether or not to show the prompt. The other problem was to figure out how to modify files created by a privileged process by an underprivileged one. By the way the latter was completely uncalled-for and it took me around two weeks to decide on a solution. To send data between processes I tried every possible IPC mechanism involving shared memory, pipes and sockets. At last I decided on sharing file descriptor between the privileged and under-privileged process and to accomplish that I used Unix local domain sockets.

  • Preview: Multi-Cursor support in the Kate Text Editor

    It allows you to have an arbitrary amount of cursors and selections in KTextEditor. They all mirror what you do with the primary one — text input, text removal, navigation, text selection, …

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.

First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G23S” SBC runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G1C, and offers -20 to 85°C support and expansion headers including a RPi-compatible 40-pin link. iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S is the first board we’ve seen to tap the Renesas RZ/G1C SoC, which debuted earlier this year. It’s also the first Renesas based SBC we’ve seen that features the increasingly ubiquitous Raspberry Pi 85 x 56mm footprint, layout, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion connector. The board is also notable for providing -20 to 85°C temperature support. Read more Also: GameShell Is An Open Source And Linux-powered Retro Game Console That You’ll Love

Games: SuperTuxKart, Tannenberg, Observer