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KDE

KDE or GNOME?

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KDE
Software

linuxblog.darkduck: I published a post recently when I told how many and which systems are installed on my laptop. If you remember, my preferred system is Kubuntu. Because of KDE.

A Research Project For KDE's KWin On Wayland

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KDE
Software

phoronix.com: Martin Gräßlin has been making some very interesting advancements to KWin in the past year or so, after having issues with open-source Mesa drivers, this German developer has made this compositing window manager for the KDE Plasma desktop run on OpenGL ES 2.0 and even optional support for OpenGL 3.x.

KDE’s Dolphin tips and tricks

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KDE

ghacks.net: If you are using the latest, greatest KDE, then you are enjoying the default Dolphin file manager. So for those of you who do want to play by the rules, I thought it might be nice to offer up a few tips and tricks for the Dolphin file manager.

Menu Bars in Dolphin (KDE)

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KDE

ppenz.blogspot: The menu bar has always been a kind of "holy grail" of user interface elements for me. Until I tried those applications I've been a strong opponent of those "menu bar violations". But after working a while with both approaches it seems that ribbons work very well.

New KWin Shadows

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KDE

blog.martin-graesslin.com: One of the features which got killed in the process of porting KWin’s Compositor to OpenGL ES was the Shadow effect. For some time already the Shadow effect was not on the level we expect from our components.

Common user interface mistakes in KDE applications, part 4: Being GNOME friendly

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KDE
Software

agateau.wordpress: This time I want to talk about being GNOME friendly. While that may sound odd for a KDE developer to think about GNOME, assuming we want our applications to reach the largest possible audience, we should try to ensure GNOME users get a pleasurable experience.

KDE Look Part 6: 4 Months In

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KDE

ericsbinaryworld.com: I started using KDE in November of last year so I figured that I’d give an update on how things are working for me four months in.

Holding on to KDE 3.5.x and Gnome 2.x in 2011

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KDE
Software

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Something I have brought up on a number of occasions when talking about software is that people are very much resistant to change. This is true of both people that use closed source software and open source software.

Towards a declarative Plasma: Containments and tablets

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KDE

notmart.org: In the KDE Plasma Workspace 4.6 there was for the first time the possibility to write Plasmoids completely with a mix of the QML declarative language and Javascript, part of QtQUICK, this makes development dramatically faster (and with dramatically I mean that in around 2 days, c++ plasmoids developed since 4.0 can been rewritten from scratch)

KDE 4.6.1 Almost Perfect

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KDE

ostatic.com: When KDE 4 was released, I hated it. It seemed a lot of my favorite customizations had changed, moved, or been removed. It was heavy and a resource hog. It didn't seem to work real well. I think KDE 4 is finally maturing into a stable and usable interface.

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