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KDE

KDE Software Down Under

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KDE
Interviews

Today we proudly feature an interview with Bernard Gray from De Bortoli Wines, an Australian winemaking company.We spoke with Bernard Gray who has worked for the company for over 10 years in an IT project management and development role. He is, in his own words: ""a tertiary qualified programmer, and has been involved in either core development or supporting development with a few Open Source distros/projects over the years"".

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What future holds for KDE’s Nepomuk?

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KDE

A recent post by Phoronix predicted that Nepomuk would stop being supported and be obsolete by this year. The article claimed, “It appears there isn’t much of a future left to KDE‘s Nepomuk framework that was developed at a cost of 17 million Euros… It’s going to be replaced going forward in the KDE land.”

That’s not true. First of all those 17 million Euros were not spend on KDE; those were invested in the Nepomuk project and Nepomuk KDE was just a small part of the entire project.

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KDE Frameworks 5 enters Alpha stage

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KDE

KDE Frameworks 5 entered alpha stage on 14th this month. The Frameworks 5 is the foundation for the next generation KDE interface. The tech preview of Frameworks 5 was released a month back. The next alpha is scheduled to be released on March 1st.

The Alpha release introduced two new frameworks, kactivities and plasma-framework. The team have also made significant progress to bring KDE to Microsoft Windows. Qt’s ”.pri” files are included in this release to facilitate qmake based projects to use individual frameworks.

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KDE Frameworks 5 Alpha Is Out

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KDE

Today KDE released the first alpha of Frameworks 5, part of a series of releases leading up to the final version planned for June 2014. This release includes progress since the Frameworks 5 Tech Preview in the beginning of this year.

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No Licence Needed for Kubuntu Derivative Distributions

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KDE
Legal

Later last year rumours of this nonsense started appearing in the tech press so instead of writing a grumpy blog post I e-mailed the community council and said they needed to nip it in the bud and state that no licence is needed to make a derivative distribution. Time passed, at some point Canonical changed their licence policy to be called an Intellectual property rights policy and be much more vague about any licences needed for binary packages. Now the community council have put out a Statement on Canonical Package Licensing which is also extremely vague and generally apologetic for Canonical doing this.

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KDE Tops Desktop Poll

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KDE

According to the results of our FOSS Force Desktop Poll, our readers prefer KDE over any other desktop environment by a wide margin. In fact, all other desktops were practically left at the gate.

The poll accompanied Ken Starks’ article Those Krazy Kids & KDE, which talked about the preference his Reglue kids express for the KDE desktop. Because Starks’ article focused on KDE, GNOME 3 and Cinnamon, we focused our poll on those same three desktops. However, we included an “Other” category, under which another desktop could be entered. The poll asked the question, “Which desktop environment do you prefer?”

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New Touchpad management app in Kubuntu 14.04

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KDE

The new app replaces the old Synaptiks touchpad management app and has many more buttons and settings that you can twiddle and tweak to get the best experience. The Kubuntu team would like to thank Alexander Mezin for working on this replacement app as part of his GSoC project. The package comes complete with its own plasmoid for easy access to enable and disable touchpads! Quite useful for folks who don’t have a physical hardware button to Enable/Disable touchpads Wink

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kate: intelligent code completion for all languages!

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KDE

Another thing which can be improved is the context sensitivity. Some languages already do this rather well, but many languages will higlight keywords also in places where it'd be easy to detect that the keyword does not make sense there. That doesn't matter that much for highlighting only, because generally users write code which makes sense, but still -- if you can detect it, both consumers of the highlighting data (the actual highlighting, and the completion engine) gain something from it. So, extra motivation for making things more exact! Wink

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KDE Plasma at the movies

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KDE

Framestore worked for several years to provide the majority of the film's effects shots, and their London-based offices appear filled to the brim with workstations running KDE Plasma. I think I may have even spotted Yakuake on a panel in there.

Interestingly, Framestore isn't the only London-based VFX house using KDE software. I previously collected a snapshot of Doctor Who VFX provider The Mill using Plasma Desktop in their work as well.

One factor driving this adoption is perhaps the synergy between our and the industry's extensive use of and familiarity with Qt - many high-end 3D modelling and video editing/compositing packages now use Qt for their UI, and often provide PyQt as convenient extensibility solution for in-house dev teams at the studios. The same is true of KDE. But I'd like to think providing a damn nice desktop experience also has something to do with it Smile.

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Leveraging the Power of Choice

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KDE

That was exactly what I had in mind (and I assume Àlex as well), and it would be a great way to leverage one of Plasma’s biggest strengths: Flexibility, which offers choice! Of course maintaining multiple Plasmoids for the same purpose also means multiplied work, but not all Plasmoids have to be created by the core Plasma team. Everyone can write a Plasmoid for a certain purpose, add the X-Plasma-Provides line to the desktop file and thereby plug it right into this system! With this in place, whenever a user complains that a Plasmoid is either too complex or offers too little choice and an alternative exists, we can point them to it and they can easily switch.

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Games for GNU/Linux

GNU/Linux Desktop

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Android Leftovers