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A dozen cool plasmoids for your KDE desktop

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KDE

techworld.com.au: A plasmoid is an applet developed with KDE’s new Plasma application development environment. So let’s take a look at what people have been cooking up with Plasma – the results are quite surprising and many are already shipping with the standard KDE 4.1 desktop.

power management goodness: kde 4.2 will suck less

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KDE

vizzzion.org: As Dario has already blogged, we have a great new application in kdebase, scheduled to be released with KDE 4.2 in january. PowerDevil is actually not an application in the traditional sense. PowerDevil delivers the infrastructure for power management in KDE.

KDE 4.1.2 tagged, gentoo land frozen

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KDE
Gentoo

freehackers.org: On July 29th, KDE 4.1, the first almost usable KDE version since the 3.5 branch, has been released, and since then guess what happened in the gentoo-kde land? Nothing. Rumors are that developers have fought each others and the kde team is just no more.

what does a "KDE app" mean?

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KDE

aseigo.blogspot: Pet peeve #47: Assuming that "a KDE app" means "you have to be logged into KDE to use it". We run into this misconception fairly regularly and it's time for a re-think.

UserBase Goes Live!

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KDE
Web

dot.kde.org: The KDE community is pleased to announce UserBase. UserBase is the new end-user wiki for KDE and complements TechBase, the wiki aimed at developers. It will contain tips and tricks, links to where to get more help, as well as an application catalogue giving an overview of the different kinds of programs that KDE offers.

On KDE4 Performance

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KDE

Aaron Aseigo: Andreas Pakulat recently blogged about performance issues with KDE 4.1 on his new desktop system. While I agree with some of the comments on that blog entry that his blog would've been better off on the kde-devel or even the kde-core-devel mailing list, since he's uncorked the genie I figured I may as well offer some commentary.

Introducing the darkest power of PowerDevil

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KDE

drfav.wordpress: Some of you might know what PowerDevil is, some might not; well, for you who fear this is yet another attempt of threatening your lives, PowerDevil is a power manager for KDE4, and it won’t kill you.

Lancelot reaches Holy Grail of KDE menu

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KDE

linux.com: KDE 4 is barely eight months old, and already it has three options for a main menu. Until now, users have either used the default Kickoff, which makes for awkward navigation of the menu tree, or reverted to the familiar but unwieldy classic menu. Now, with the first full release of Lancelot, users have another option.

KDE Congratulates CERN's Large Hadron Collider

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KDE
Sci/Tech

dot.kde.org: Today was Big Bang Day at CERN as the world's largest science experiment was turned on. Like all good technology enthusiasts the KDE developers have been keeping up with the progress of the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.

KDE in openSUSE 11.1 and beyond

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KDE
SUSE

opensuse.org: KDE is hugely important to the openSUSE project, and openSUSE’s users. According to our most recent survey, a total of 68.3% of respondents are using KDE, so when it’s time to decide how to support KDE as it moves through its transition period, it’s not something that is taken lightly.

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