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Leftovers: KDE

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  • KDE Plasma 5.7 Beta
  • KDE Plasma 5.7 to Ship with Huge Wayland Improvements, New System Tray

    Today, June 17, 2016, KDE has had the great pleasure of announcing that the Beta of the forthcoming KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment is now available for public beta testing.

    Initially planned for June 16, KDE Plasma 5.7 Beta is here, and we can finally see what the KDE developers have prepared for fans of the modern, Qt5-based desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems. And just by taking a quick look at the release notes, we can notice that a lot of goodies are coming.

  • KDE e.V. joins advisory board of The Document Foundation

    The Document Foundation announces that KDE e.V. is joining the organization’s Advisory Board, and at the same time The Document Foundation joins KDE’s group of advising community partners as an affiliate.

  • GNOME & KDE Join The Document Foundation Advisory Board

    The GNOME Foundation and KDE e.V. have joined the Advisory Board of The Document Foundation.

    The GNOME Foundation and KDE e.V. have joined TDF's Advisory Board while in exchange The Document Foundation now has a seat on the boards of both GNOME and KDE. The press message The Document Foundation sent out this morning explained, "The objective is to strengthen relationships between the largest not for profit organizations focused on open source software, to foster the growth of the entire ecosystem."

  • The Qt Company Releases Qt 5.7
  • Qt 5.7 GUI Toolkit Released with Raspberry Pi 3 Support, Qt Creator 4.0

    Today, June 16, 2016, the Qt Company was proud to announce the final release and general availability of the long-anticipated Qt 5.7 GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit for all supported platforms.

    As many of you expected, Qt 5.7 is a major release that brings exciting new features and technologies for any and all Qt application developers out there, no matter if they're using a GNU/Linux distribution or the latest Windows 10 and macOS operating systems.

KDE Plasma 5.7 Beta Release

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This release brings an all-new login screen design completing the Breeze startup experience we trialed in Plasma 5.6. The layout has been tidied up and is more suitable for workstations that are part of a domain or company network. The Air and Oxygen Plasma themes which we still fully support for users that prefer a more three-dimensional design have also been improved.

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.7 Beta Released

Leftovers: KDE

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  • KDE e.V. Joins Advisory Board of The Document Foundation

    Today we are delighted to announce that KDE e.V. is joining the advisory board of The Document Foundation, the foundation backing LibreOffice and the Document Liberation Project. The Document Foundation also joins KDE e.V.'s group of advising community partners as an affiliate.

    The KDE Community has been creating Free Software since 1996 and shares a lot of values around Free Software and open document formats with The Document Foundation, and brings the experience of running a Free Software organization for almost two decades to their advisory board. Both organizations are working in the OASIS technical committee for the OpenDocument Format. We also collaborate on common aspects of development of office software, such as usability and visual design. The affiliation of KDE e.V. and The Document Foundation on an organizational level will help to move forward with the shared goal of giving end users control of their computing needs through Free Software.

  • KDE Doing a Survey for Input on our Mission
  • KDAB, Qt 3D and the Release of Qt 5.7

    Some of you may know that Qt 3D is going strong almost entirely due to the work of the KDAB team, led by Dr. Sean Harmer and Paul Lemire. You can read all about its near demise and ultimate rescue here – it’s quite a story, and started with the release of Qt 4.

    Now we are approaching another major chapter in the Qt 3D story, as Qt 5.7.0 is released along with a fully supported stable Qt 3D module. Qt 3D offers a high-level facility for 3D graphics, paving the way for making 3D content a first class citizen in Qt applications. This is big news!

Qt 5.7 released

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I’m very happy to announce that Qt 5.7 is now available. It’s been only 3 months since we released Qt 5.6, so one might expect a rather small release with Qt 5.7. But apart from the usual bug fixes and performance improvements, we have managed to add a whole bunch of new things to this release.

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Also: Qt 5.7.0 Officially Is Out

KDE Plasma 5.6.5 Is the Last in the Series, KDE Plasma 5.7 Coming July 5

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Today, June 14, 2016, KDE has released the fifth and last maintenance update of the KDE Plasma 5.6 desktop environment series.

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KDE Frameworks 5.23.0 Adds Many KWayland and Plasma Framework Improvements

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Today, June 13, 2016, KDE has had the great pleasure of announcing the release and general availability of this month's KDE Frameworks 5 maintenance update, version 5.23.0.

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Also: KDE Frameworks 5.23 Released

Leftovers: KDE

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Leftovers: KDE

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  • KApiDox (or I need your input !
  • Watching Digital TV Via Kaffeine

    Kaffeine is a media player application that uses the KDE libraries. As part of my work maintaining the Linux Kernel media subsystem I needed some tools to test whether or not the digital TV core support works properly and to test Linux drivers for new devices. So, I’ve recently been working to improve Kaffeine to offer the necessary features for such tests. As part of this, I recently created a major Kaffeine version (2.0) that uses the latest version of KF5 (KDE Frameworks 5), and to use Qt5 library. I also started helping with upstream Kaffeine maintenance.

  • Finally: Umbrello works on MsWindows

    One of the tasks in my Google Summer of Code project was build Umbrello using KF5 in MsWindows and see if had any problems.

  • Interview with Sara Tepes

    My name’s Sara Tepes, I’m 17 years old, I was born in Romania but grew up in the U.S. and I live super close to Washington D.C. I love roses, rabbits, tea, and historical movies.

  • Dear Planet KDE readers...

    Here's a handy tip for you - if you see a post that you don't want to read, use your mouse/touchpad scroll thingy with direction "down", keep using it until you don't see the post anymore.

  • Why planetkde needs to have political posts
  • The Purpose of Planets

    Planet KDE and similar sites exist to show the people in the communities, what they are working on and what their interests and characters are. It’s not an official news site like KDE Dot News and it’s not even on the domain which I find disappointing. Posts on topics outwith KDE are encouraged as that gives insight into our friends we work with and builds community.

  • KDE neon User Edition 5.6

    Polishing is important but after a while you need to put a fork in it and decide it’s done and so we’ve announced KDE neon User Edition 5.6, our first edition which we advocate for our target audience.

  • Let's wait a bit longer

    I recently learned that the guys at Openmandriva camp are working hard and are going to release a release candidate soon.

    Mageia is doing the same. That means that two of my favorite distros will have a new version to offer.

    What makes me uneasy is KDE 5. I am not a big fan of this desktop environment.

    Oh, and I read yesterday that PCLOS is releasing a new iso... also with KDE 5! My reaction was that of Julius Caesar: "Et tu, PCLOS! Then, fall, Mechatotoro!"

    But the PCLOS devs understand that not everyone is crazy about KDE 5, so they kindly and wisely state that "you can keep your KDE 4 if you want to because nobody is going to force you to use KDE 5."

  • Kdenlive Café and News

    In the last weeks, we worked to improve the timeline preview (pre-rendering) feature, and added a few UI improvements, like a progress bar in the Render button, see screenshot.

  • And done!

    But not all was laziness! Yesterday, all Kickstarter backers got their surveys, and over half have already returned them! Today, the people who backed us through paypal got their surveys, and we got a fair return rate as well!

  • The 2016 Kickstarter

    This year's kickstarter fundraising campaign for Krita was more nerve-wracking than the previous two editions. Although we ended up 135% funded, we were almost afraid we wouldn't make it, around the middle. Maybe only the release of Krita 3.0 turned the campaign around. Here's my chaotic and off-the-cuff analysis of this campaign.

  • Building of Minuet Application on Android- Part 1
  • Building of Minuet Application on Android- Part 2
  • Refreshing MUP

    MUP, my markup previewer, was starting to show its age, being based on PyQt 4 and Python 2. I spent a bit of time last week to port it to PyQt 5 and Python 3.

  • events?(Kolab)

    I joined Kolab Systems just over 1.5 years ago, and during that time I have put a lot of my energy and time into working with the amazing team of people here to improve our processes and execution of those processes around sales, communication, community engagement, professional services delivery, and product development. They have certainly kept me busy and moving at warp 9, but the results have certainly been their own reward as we have moved together from strength to strength across the board.

  • New IMAP filter/proxy release: guam 0.8, eimap 0.2

    Over the last few months I have been poking away at a refactoring of the IMAP library that Kolab's IMAP filter/proxy uses behind the scenes, called eimap. It consolidated quite a bit of duplicated code between the various IMAP commands that are supported, and fixed a few bugs along the way. This refactoring dropped the code count, makes implementing new commands even easier, and has allowed for improvements that affect all commands (usually because they are related to the core IMAP protocol) to be made in one central place. This was rolled as eimap 0.2 the other week and has made its way through the packaging process for Kolab. This is a significant milestone for eimap on the path to being able to be considered "stable".

  • My thoughts on KDE

    Some weeks ago, I was criticized on KDE Cafe group on Telegram because, when I see that after months of inputs some people still have a very enormous misconception of EU, I insisted on informing them.

  • Randa Meetings 2016 will start soon – please support us
  • I’m going to Randa!

    While most of the participants seem to be going to the meeting for the purpose of getting more KDE applications on Windows, MacOS or Android — indeed platforms where our technology can make a difference for developers and where our applications can make a difference for Freedom — I’m going with a slightly different purpose. I’m there for our traditional niche platforms: the BSD’s. But also for packaging in a traditional sense, and for building our software effectively and efficiently.

  • Randa Meeting 2016 – Tomorrow on Tour ;=)
  • KDE on Flatpak in Randa

    I talked about KDE on Flatpak before (called xdg-app then). Lots happened since: new name, fancy new website and a couple of releases shows it’s getting quite stable.


    Also we need to compile the applications, start using them and see where’s the limitations, especially regarding the sandboxing. In the end, we also want to bring KDE applications to our GNU/Linux users who cannot reach our stable releases.

  • How I met our Algorithm!

    So I have successfully completed the community bonding period and it was 23, May 2016 when Davide, Alessandro and me decided to dig deeper into our Google Summer of Code project WikiToLearn:Ratings.

  • Wiki, what’s going on? (Part 4-Participation Sprint)
  • #26: GSoC with KDE – 4

    In the past week, I worked on the code reviews I got. Hence, I changed the classes’ design all over. The way it works now, is that there is a central dispatcher, the daemon, that handles all the jobs. I chose this design, since it was how originally KIMAP jobs, was supposed to be managed. My mentor and Daniel Vratil helped me in deciding this.

  • Gsoc 2016 Neverland #3
  • Let's modify your FITS files

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
  • Randa Meetings 2016 Fundraising Campaign
  • Krita 3.0: The Animation Release

    Krita 3.0 is finally here! Releasing round version-number releases is always exciting for any kind of project. It’s like the start of a new beginning! And 3.0 presents a lot of new beginnings to us as well: First, we have now our own repository, for our code, as well as our own wiki, for the manual! So we started this release with a Spring-cleaning: Porting to Qt 5 and KDE Frameworks 5, necessary to keep Krita easy to maintain in the future. But also cleaning out the code. We removed lines of dustbunny code and reorganized all the files. We also started work on making OSX a first-class platform for Krita, but though we’ve already done lots of work, that is still a work in progress.

Q&A: Jonathan Riddell on the release of KDE neon User Edition 5.6

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I’m thrilled to be part of the first project to bring KDE’s flagship desktop software to our users direct from the KDE community. We had to fill in a few gaps in what Plasma offers its users to complete the experience but we did that by working in Plasma rather than doing our work separately. So we added bootup themes for Grub and Plymouth and we’ve worked to make sure the app store, Discover, covers the whole archive. But the most important feature is what Neon is intended to be, a Plasma 5.6 desktop as the developers intended it.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Google’s Open Source Report Card Highlights Game-Changing Contributions
    Ask people about Google’s relationship to open source, and many of them will point to Android and Chrome OS — both very successful operating systems and both based on Linux. Android, in particular, remains one of the biggest home runs in open source history. But, as Josh Simmons from Google’s Open Source Programs Office will tell you, Google also contributes a slew of useful open source tools and programs to the community each year. Now, Google has issued its very first “Open Source Report Card,” as announced by Simmons on the Google Open Source Blog. "We're sharing our first Open Source Report Card, highlighting our most popular projects, sharing a few statistics and detailing some of the projects we've released in 2016. We've open sourced over 20 million lines of code to date and you can find a listing of some of our best known project releases on our website," said Simmons.
  • Nino Vranešič: Open Source Advocate and Mozilla Rep in Slovenia
    “My name is Nino Vranešič and I am connecting IT and Society,” is what Nino says about himself on LinkedIn. The video is a little hard to understand in places due to language differences and (we think) a slow or low-bandwidth connection between the U.S.-based Zoom servers and Eastern Europe, a problem that crops up now and then in video conversation and VOIP phone calls with people in that part of the world, no matter what service you choose. But Vranešič is worth a little extra effort to hear, because it’s great to learn that open source is being used in lots of government agencies, not only in Slovenia but all over Europe. And aside from this, Vranešič himself is a tres cool dude who is an ardent open source volunteer (“Mozilla Rep” is an unpaid volunteer position), and I hope I have a chance to meet him F2F next time he comes to a conference in Florida — and maybe you’ll have a chance to meet him if he comes to a conference near you.
  • MySQL and database programming for beginners
    Dave Stokes has been using MySQL for more than 15 years and has served as its community manager since 2010. At All Things Open this year, he'll give a talk about database programming for newbies with MySQL. In this interview, he previews his talk and shares a few helpful resources, required skills, and common problems MySQL beginners run into.
  • Nadella's trust talk is just so much hot air
    Microsoft chief executive Satya Nadella appears to have an incredibly short memory. Else he would be the last person who talks about trust being the most pressing issue in tech in our times. Over the last year, we have been treated to a variety of cheap tricks by Microsoft, attempting to hoodwink Windows users left, right and centre in order to get them to upgrade to Windows 10. After that, talking about trust sounds odd. Very odd. Microsoft does not have the best reputation among tech companies. It is known for predatory practices, for being convicted as a monopolist, and in recent times has been trying to cultivate a softer image as a company that is not as rapacious as it once was. That has, in large measure, come about as its influence and rank in the world of computing have both slipped, with other companies like Apple, Facebook and Google coming to dominate.
  • If you wish, you may rebuild all dports to use non-base SSL library of your choice
  • DragonFlyBSD Continues LibreSSL Push, OpenSSL To Be Dropped
    DragonFlyBSD is now defaulting to LibreSSL throughout its operating system stack and is planning to completely remove OpenSSL in the near future. Last month DragonFlyBSD began using LibreSSL by default while that effort has continued. OpenSSL is no longer being built by default and in about one month's time the OpenSSL support will be completely stripped from the DragonFly tree.
  • Ranking the Web With Radical Transparency
    Ranking every URL on the web in a transparent and reproducible way is a core concept of the Common Search project, says Sylvain Zimmer, who will be speaking at the upcoming Apache: Big Data Europe conference in Seville, Spain. The web has become a critical resource for humanity, and search engines are its arbiters, Zimmer says. However, the only search engines currently available are for-profit entities, so the Common Search project is creating a nonprofit engine that is open, transparent, and independent. We spoke with Zimmer, who founded Jamendo, dotConferences, and Common Search, to learn more about why nonprofit search engines are important, why Apache Spark is such a great match for the job, and some of the challenges the project faces.
  • A look inside the 'blinky flashy' world of wearables and open hardware
    While looking at the this year's All Things Open event schedule, a talk on wearables and open hardware caught my eye: The world of the blinky flashy. Naturally, I dug deeper to learn what it was all about.
  • Why Perl is not use for new development , most of time use for maintenance and support projects ?
    There has been a tendency amongst some companies to play a “wait and see” attitude towards Perl, but the Perl market appears to have stabilized in the past couple of years and more companies appear to be returning to Perl. As one of our clients explained to me when I asked why they chose Perl “We’re tired of being bitten by hype.”

And More Security Leftovers

  • The NyaDrop Trojan for Linux-running IoT Devices
  • Flaw resides in BTB helps bypass ASLR
  • Thoughts on the BTB Paper
    Though the attack might have some merits with regards to KASLR, the attack on ASLR is completely debunked. The authors of the paper didn't release any supporting code or steps for independent analysis and verification. The results, therefore, cannot be trusted until the authors fully open source their work and the work is validated by trusted and independent third parties.
  • Spreading the DDoS Disease and Selling the Cure
    Earlier this month a hacker released the source code for Mirai, a malware strain that was used to launch a historically large 620 Gbps denial-of-service attack against this site in September. That attack came in apparent retribution for a story here which directly preceded the arrest of two Israeli men for allegedly running an online attack for hire service called vDOS. Turns out, the site where the Mirai source code was leaked had some very interesting things in common with the place vDOS called home.

Blockchain and FOSS

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Celebrating 12 years of Ubuntu
    Founder Mark Shuttleworth announced the first public release of Ubuntu – version 4.10, or “Warty Warthog” – on Oct. 20, 2004. The idea behind what would become the most recognizable and widely used Linux distributions ever was simple – create a Linux operating system that anybody could use. Here’s a look back at Ubuntu’s history.
  • Happy 12th Birthday, Ubuntu!
    Yup, it’s twelve years to the day since Mark Shuttleworth sat down to tap out the first Ubuntu release announcement and herald in an era of “Linux for human beings”.
  • A Slice of Ubuntu
    The de facto standard for Raspberry Pi operating systems is Raspbian–a Debian based distribution specifically for the diminutive computer. Of course, you have multiple choices and there might not be one best choice for every situation. It did catch our eye, however, that the RaspEX project released a workable Ubunutu 16.10 release for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. RaspEX is a full Linux Desktop system with LXDE (a lightweight desktop environment) and many other useful programs. Firefox, Samba, and VNC4Server are present. You can use the Ubuntu repositories to install anything else you want. The system uses kernel 4.4.21. You can see a review of a much older version of RaspEX in the video below.
  • Download Ubuntu Yakkety Yak 16.10 wallpaper
    The Yakkety Yak 16.10 is released and now you can download the new wallpaper by clicking here. It’s the latest part of the set for the Ubuntu 2016 releases following Xenial Xerus. You can read about our wallpaper visual design process here.
  • Live kernel patching from Canonical now available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    We are delighted to announce the availability of a new service for Ubuntu which any user can enable on their current installations – the Canonical Livepatch Service. This new live kernel patching service can be used on any Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system (using the generic Linux 4.4 kernel) to minimise unplanned downtime and maintain the highest levels of security.
  • How to enable free 'Canonical Livepatch Service' for Linux kernel live-patching on Ubuntu
    Linux 4.0 introduced a wonderful feature for those that need insane up-time -- the ability to patch the kernel without rebooting the machine. While this is vital for servers, it can be beneficial to workstation users too. Believe it or not, some home users covet long up-time simply for fun -- bragging rights, and such. If you are an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS user (with generic Linux kernel 4.4) and you want to take advantage of this exciting feature, I have good news -- it is now conveniently available for free! Unfortunately, this all-new Canonical Livepatch Service does have a catch -- it is limited to three machines per user. Of course, home users can register as many email addresses as they want, so it is easy to get more if needed. Businesses can pay for additional machines through Ubuntu Advantage. Want to give it a go? Read on. "Since the release of the Linux 4.0 kernel about 18 months ago, users have been able to patch and update their kernel packages without rebooting. However, until now, no other Linux distribution has offered this feature for free to their users. That changes today with the release of the Canonical Livepatch Service", says Tom Callway, Director of Cloud Marketing, Canonical.
  • KernelCare Is Another Alternative To Canonical's Ubuntu Live Kernel Patching
    Earlier this week Canonical announced their Kernel Livepatching Service for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users. Canonical's service is free for under three systems while another alternative for Ubuntu Linux users interested in a commercial service is CloudLinux's KernelCare. The folks from CloudLinux wrote in to remind us of their kernel patching solution, which they've been offering since 2014 and believe is a superior solution to Canonical's service. KernelCare isn't limited to just Ubuntu 16.04 but also works with Ubuntu 14.04 and other distributions such as CentOS/RHEL, Debian, and other enterprise Linux distributions.