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KDE: QtWebEngine on FreeBSD, KDE PIM, Akademy 2017, Craft, Accessibility, Comics Manager for Krita, Progress on Kube

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KDE
  • QtWebEngine on FreeBSD

    Tobias and Raphael pushed the button today to push QtWebEngine into FreeBSD ports. This has been a monumental effort, because the codebase is just .. ugh. Not meant for third-party consumption, let’s say. There are 76 patches needed to get it to compile at all. Lots of annoying changes to make, like explaining that pkg-config is not a Linux-only technology. Nor is NSS, or Mesa, while #include
    is, in fact, Linux-only. Lots of patches can be shared with the Chromium browser, but it’s a terrible time-sink nonetheless.

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  • KDE PIM in Randa 2017

    Randa Meetings is an annual meeting of KDE developers in a small village in Swiss Alps. The Randa Meetings is the most productive event I ever attended (since there’s nothing much else to do but hack from morning until night and eat Mario’s chocolate Smile) and it’s very focused – this year main topic is making KDE more accessible.

    Several KDE PIM developers will be present as well – and while we will certainly want to hear other’s input regarding accessibility of Kontact, our main goal in Randa will be to port away from KDateTime (the KDE4 way of handling date and time in software) to QDateTime (the Qt way of handling date and time). This does not sound very interesting, but it’s a very important step for us, as afterward, we will finally be free of all legacy KDE4 code. It is no simple task, but we are confident we can finish the port during the hackfest. If everything goes smoothly, we might even have time for some more cool improvements and fixes in Kontact Wink

  • Services Collaborating Openly at Akademy 2017

    At the recently concluded Akademy 2017 in the incredibly hot but lovely Almería, yours truly went and did something a little silly: Submitted both a talk (which got accepted) and hosted a BoF, both about Open Collaboration Services, and the software stack which KDE builds to support that API in the software we produce. The whole thing was amazing. A great deal of work, very tiring, but all 'round amazing. I even managed to find time to hack a little bit on Calligra Gemini, which was really nice.

    This blog entry collects the results from the presentation and the BoF. I realise this is quite long, but i hope that you stick with it. In the BoF rundown, i have highlighted the specific results, so hopefully you'll be able to skim-and-detail-read your specific interest areas Wink

  • Akademy 2017 - A wonderful experience

    Akademy 2017 was such a great experience, that I would love to share with you all in this post.

  • Akademy 2017 - Recap

    Last month I had opportunity to visit the Almería, Spain for Akademy 2017. Akademy 2017 is KDE’s annual world summit. Akademy makes it possible to meet the felow KDE contributors, some of whom you only know with their IRC nicknames (Yes, I am not old enough to know every contributors yet Tongue). Here is few things I did at the Akademy 2017.

  • My Adventures on Crafting part III – Craft Atelier

    Once upon a time, I start o use Craft, an amazing tool inside KDE that does almost all the hard work to compile KDE Applications on Windows and MacOS.

    Thanks to the great work of Hannah since last year Randa Meetings, Craft is becoming a great tool. Using all the power of Python, I started to be able to work on the deploy of AtCore for Windows.

  • Why YOU care about accessibility, and can help!

    Accessibility (a11y for short) seems like a niche area of concern for many people. I was thinking about this recently on a hot morning in Spain, walking to the bus station with my wheeled luggage. The sidewalks are thoughtfully cut out for wheelchairs -- and those with luggage! and the kids riding skateboards, and...... the rest of us.

  • Writing a comics manager for Krita

    Those who know me, or at the least know my history with Krita is that one of the prime things I personally want to use Krita for is making comics. So back in the day one of the things I did was make a big forum post discussing the different parts of making a comic and how different software solves it.

    One of the things about making a comic is that is a project. Meaning, it is big and unwieldy, with multiple files and multiple disciplines. You need to be able to write, to draw, to ink, to color. And you need to be able to do this consistently.

  • Progress on Kube

    We’ve been mostly focusing on ironing out UX problems all over the place. It turns out, when writing desktop applications using QtQuick you’ll be ending up with a lot of details to figure out for yourself.

KDE: KStars, KWin, Go support in KDevelop, Qt News, Plasma Mobile, Shelf and More Akademy

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KDE
  • KStars 2.8.1 "Hipster" Release is out!

    The highlight for this release is experimental support for HiPS: Hierarchical Progressive Surveys. HiPS provides multi-resolution progressive surveys to be overlayed directly in client applications, such as KStars. It provides an immersive experience as you can explore the night sky dynamically.

    With over 200+ surveys across the whole electromagnetic spectrum from radio, infrared, visual, to even gamma rays, the user can pan and zoom progressively deeper into the data visually.

  • Distribution management – how Upstream ensures Downstream keeps the Quality

    I read Emmanuele Bassi’s very interesting blog post about software distribution this week and thought a lot about it. Emmanuele kind of answers to a presentation by Richard Brown (from OpenSUSE fame). While I haven’t seen that presentation, I saw a similar one last year at the openSUSE conference and also talked with Richard about the topic. So I dare to think that I understand Richard’s arguments and even agree with most of them.

    Nevertheless I want to share some of my thoughts on the topic from the perspective of KWin maintainership. KWin is more part of the OS stack, so distributing through means like Flatpack are not a valid option IMHO. As KWin is close to the OS, we have a very well integration with distributions. Plasma (which KWin is part of) has dedicated packager groups in most distributions, we have a direct communication channel to the distros, we know our packagers in large parts in person, etc. etc. So from the open source distribution model we are in the best category. We are better positioned than let’s say a new game which needs to be distributed.

  • Go support in KDevelop. GSoC week 11. Code completion and bug fixing.
  • Introducing QtMqtt
  • 2017 for Qt Contributors

    This is a good year to be a Qt contributor.

    There was Qt Day Italy in June. From what I hear, the event was a success. The talks were great and everything worked. This was the sixth Qt Day Italy, so there is tradition behind this event!

    Even though it is not a Qt event, KDE Akademy is worth mentioning. Akademy is the annual world summit of KDE, one of the largest Free Software communities in the world. It is a free, non-commercial event organized by the KDE Community. This year Akademy was in Almeria Spain, in late July, 22nd to 27th. KDE has over the years brought many excellent developers to Qt, and they are definitely the biggest open source project using Qt.

  • KDE Applications 17.08 Officially Out, More Apps Were Ported to KDE Frameworks 5

    The KDE Project is pleased to announce the release and general availability of the KDE Applications 17.08 software suite primarily designed for KDE Plasma 5 desktop environments, but also compatible with other desktops and window managers.

    KDE Applications 17.08 has been in development since mid-July 2017, and it received both a Beta and an RC build that users could test on their GNU/Linux distros if they had access to these pre-release packages. But the final release is now officially out and it's coming soon to the repos of your favorite operating system.

    "We have worked to make both the applications and the underlying libraries more stable and easier to use. By ironing out wrinkles and listening to your feedback, we have made the KDE Applications suite less prone to glitches and much friendlier. Enjoy your new apps," reads the release announcement.

  • Modest Wallpaper Tweaks
  • Sixth Blog Gsoc 2017

    Hi, this post is general information about telemetry in Krita. I want to clarify some points.

    Soon we will launch a preliminary testing of my branch. In case of successful testing, it will go into one of the closest releases of Krita (not 3.2). Krita must follow the policy of the KDE on information gathering. What information do we want to collect?

  • Plasma Mobile - Journey Towards Open Mobile Platform (slides from Akademy 2017)
  • Documents Shelf [KAMD, KAStats]

    Once upon a time, for those who remember the old days of Plasma and Lancelot, there was an experimental applet called Shelf.

    The idea behind the Shelf was that sometimes it is useful to have a small applet that just shows your recent files, favourite applications, devices, which you can place on your panel or desktop for quick access.

    Now, this post is not about a revival of Lancelot and Shelf (sadly), but it is closely related to them.

    Namely, I always disliked the “recent documents” section that is available in almost all launchers in Plasma. The reason is that only one in ten of those documents has a chance to ever be opened again.

  • Running applications and unittests without "make install"

    In our Akademy presentation, Kévin and I showed the importance for a better developer story to be able to work on a KDE module without having to install it. Running unittests and running applications without installing the module at all is possible, it turns out, it just needs a bit of effort to set things up correctly.

Plasma 5.11 Wallpaper

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KDE

Well, it’s that time of the year again where I talk about wallpapers!

For those who watched the livestream of the beach wallpaper, you’ll notice this isn’t what I had been working on. Truth be told after the stream I hit a few artistic blocks which brought progress to a grinding halt. I plan to finish that wallpaper, but for this release I created something entirely different while I decide what to do with it. I enjoyed this “wireframe” effect, and will probably experiment with it again.

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KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.08.0

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KDE
  • KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.08.0

    August 17, 2017. KDE Applications 17.08 is here. We have worked to make both the applications and the underlying libraries more stable and easier to use. By ironing out wrinkles and listening to your feedback, we have made the KDE Applications suite less prone to glitches and much friendlier. Enjoy your new apps!

  • KDE Applications 17.08 Released, More Apps Ported To KF5

    Out today is the latest four-month update to the KDE Applications collection of desktop packages.

    With KDE Applications 17.08 being the last cycle where kdelibs4-based packages are allowed before being dropped if not ported to KDE Frameworks 5, there was more porting this cycle in transitioning these packages to using the modern KDE libraries.

Kdenlive 17.08 released

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KDE

Kdenlive 17.08 is released bringing minor fixes and improvements. Some of the highlights include fixing the Freeze effect and resolving inconsistent checkbox displays in the effects pannel. Downloaded transition Lumas now appear in the interface. Now it is possible to assign a keyboard shortcut for the Extract Frame feature also a name is now suggested based on the frame number. Navigation of clip markers in the timeline behave as expected upon opening the project. Audio clicks issues are resolved although this requires building MLT from git or wait for a release. In this cycle we’ve also bumped the Windows version from Alpha to Beta.

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Krita 3.2.0 Released

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KDE
  • Krita 3.2.0 Released

    Later than planned, here’s Krita 3.2.0! With the new G’Mic-qt plugin integration, the smart patch tool, finger painting on touch screens, new brush presets and a lot of bug fixes. Read the full release notes for more information!. Here’s GDQuest’s video introducing 3.2.0:

  • Krita 3.2 Released For Leading Open-Source Digital Painting

    The Krita project has today announced version 3.2 is ready of their open-source, cross-platform digital painting program.

    Krita 3.2 features new G'Mic-qt plugin integration, a smart patch tool, finger painting on touch screens, new brush presets, a variety of fixes, and other minor improvements.

Releases: PostgreSQL 10 Beta 3 and KDE Frameworks 5.37

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KDE
Server
OSS
  • PostgreSQL 10 Beta 3 Released!

    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the third beta release of PostgreSQL 10 is available for download. This release contains previews of all of the features which will be available in the final release of version 10, including fixes to many of the issues found in the second beta. Users are encouraged to begin testing their applications against 10 beta3.

  • PostgreSQL 10 Beta 3 Arrives

    Those wishing to do some database testing this weekend can try out PostgreSQL 10's third beta update, which was released earlier this week.

    Postgre developers are hoping those making use of this SQL database system will try their workloads against PostgreSQL 10 Beta 3. It has all the features to be found in this next stable release and has many bug fixes over the prior versions.

  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.37.0
  • KDE Frameworks 5.37 Released

    Ending out the weekend, the KDE crew has released Frameworks 5.37 as the collection of complementary components to Qt5.

KDE Frameworks 5.37.0 Released for KDE Plasma 5 Desktops with 119 Changes

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KDE

KDE on Sunday announced the release and general availability of the monthly maintenance update of the KDE Frameworks collection of over 70 add-on libraries for Qt, versioned 5.37.0.

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Release GCompris Qt 0.80

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KDE
Sci/Tech

We are pleased to announce the release of GCompris version 0.80.

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KDE: Qt, Slimbook, Brooklyn, KWayland and KWin, Akademy

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KDE
  • Let There Be More Shapes!

    As a follow-up to the previous post about the upcoming new Shape element, I am happy to share that the feature set is going to be bigger than previously expected, and this applies already to the upcoming 5.10 release of Qt.

  • A laptop by KDE

    Earlier this year we announced a joint venture between KDE and Slimbook that we named the KDE Slimbook.

    Last Akademy we had the opportunity to meet the Slimbook team and discuss its purpose and future. I’m quite happy about the discussions, here’s my feedback.

  • How to extend Brooklyn with new chat protocols

    Do you like Brooklyn but you use a chat protocol which is not officially supported?
    All you have to do is following this tutorial step by step!

    First of all, you have to check if there is a Java library for the protocol whereby you want to create the bot.
    If it doesn't exist, you've to write it by yourself (as I did to support Rocket.Chat). Then, add the library you have just created to Maven.
    Finally import it on Brooklyn through Maven.

  • Another iteration and one tough bug

    I didn’t want to give up and so I looked through the KWayland and KWin code related to pointer locking and confinement, which is a lot. Hours later I finally found the root cause: KWin creates small on screen notifications when a pointer is locked or confined to a window. Most of the time this works without problem, but with the above patch to Xwayland the client sends in quick succession the pointer confine and lock requests to KWin and for some reason when trying to show both notifications at the same time KWin or maybe the QML engine for the notification can’t process any further. Without the patch Xwayland always only sent the confinement request and nothing blocked. I don’t know how Martin would like to have this issue solved so I created a bug report for now. It’s weird that it was such a petty cause in the end with such huge consequences, but that’s how it goes.

  • Akademy (22-27) 2017
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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Mesa 17.2.6 RC, AMDGPU, and Vulkan

  • Mesa 17.2.6 release candidate
  • Mesa 17.2.6 RC Arrives With 50+ Fixes
    While Mesa 17.3 is imminent and should be released as stable within the next few days, Mesa 17.2.6 is being prepped for release as the current point release.
  • 43 More AMDGPU DC Patches Hit The Streets
    While the massive AMDGPU DC infrastructure has been merged for Linux 4.15, the flow of improvements to this display code continues and it looks like the next few kernel cycles at least could be quite busy on the AMD front.
  • A Prototype Of The Vulkan Portability Initiative: Low-Level 3D To Vulkan / D3D12 / Metal
    A Mozilla engineer has put out a prototype library in working on the Vulkan Portability Initiative for allowing low-level 3D graphics support that's backed by Vulkan / Direct3D 12 / Metal. With Apple sticking to their own Metal graphics API and Direct3D 12 still being the dominant graphics API on Windows 10, The Khronos Group has been working towards better 3D portability for where Vulkan may not be directly supported by the OS/drivers or otherwise available. They've been working to target a subset of the Vulkan API that can be efficiently mapped to these other native graphics APIs and to have the libraries and tooling for better compatibility and code re-use of these different graphics APIs.

Kernel: Linux 4.15, TLDR, and Linus Torvalds' Latest Rant

  • Linux 4.15 Adds AMD Raven Ridge Audio ID
    Not only is AMD Stoney Ridge audio (finally) being supported by the Linux 4.15 kernel, but it also looks like Raven Ridge audio should now be working too.
  • Linux 4.14.2 Fixes The BCache Corruption Bug
    Normally I don't bother mentioning new Linux kernel point releases on Phoronix unless there are some significant changes, as is the case today with Linux 4.14.2.
  • TLDR is what Linux man pages always should have been
    If you get stuck using a Linux tool, the first port of call shouldn’t be to Stack Overflow, but rather its “man pages.” Man — which is short for manual — retrieves documentation for a given program. Unfortunately, this can often be dense, hard to understand, and lacking in practical examples to help you solve your problem. TLDR is another way of looking at documentation. Rather than being a comprehensive guide to a given tool, it instead focuses on offering practical example-driven instructions of how something works.
  • Linux creator Linus Torvalds: This is what drives me nuts about IT security
    Developers are often accused of not thinking about security, but Linux kernel founder Linus Torvalds has had enough of security people who don't think about developers and end-users. After blasting some kernel developers last week for killing processes in the name of hardening the kernel, Torvalds has offered a more measured explanation for his frustration with security myopia. While he agrees that having multiple layers of security in the kernel is a good idea, certain ways of implementing it are not, in particular if it annoys users and developers by killing processes that break users' machines and wreck core kernel code. Because ultimately, if there are no users, there's not much point in having a supremely secure kernel, Torvalds contends.

Unity 7 Hoping To Become An Official Flavor For Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

While Canonical abandoned their work on the Unity desktop environment in favor of the Unity-inspired customized GNOME Shell that debuted in Ubuntu 17.10, some within the community have remained interested in maintaining Unity 7 and even getting it into an official spin/flavor of Ubuntu. Posted today to the community.ubuntu.com was a Unity maintenance roadmap, reiterating the hope by some in the Ubuntu community for Ubuntu Unity to become an official LTS distribution of Ubuntu. They are hoping to make it an official flavor alongside Kubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Xubuntu, and others. Read more Original/direct: Unity Maintenance Roadmap

Programming/Development: Django and Google India

  • An introduction to the Django ORM
    One of the most powerful features of Django is its Object-Relational Mapper (ORM), which enables you to interact with your database, like you would with SQL. In fact, Django's ORM is just a pythonical way to create SQL to query and manipulate your database and get results in a pythonic fashion. Well, I say just a way, but it's actually really clever engineering that takes advantage of some of the more complex parts of Python to make developers' lives easier.
  • Hey, Coders! Google India Is Offering 130,000 Free Developer Scholarships — Here’s How To Apply
  • Google to prepare 1.3 lakh Indians for emerging technologies

    "The new scholarship programme is in tandem with Google's aim to train two million developers in India. The country is the second largest developer ecosystem in the world and is bound to overtake the US by 2021," William Florance, Developer Products Group and Skilling Lead for India, Google, told reporters here.