Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

Ubuntu Studio 18.10 To Offer A KDE Plasma Desktop Option

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

The multimedia-focused Ubuntu Studio Linux distribution has used GNOME since its inception and while that is continuing for now, a sign of a possible shift is coming with Ubuntu Studio 18.10 to offer a KDE Plasma desktop option.

For this next Ubuntu Studio release, the GNOME Shell desktop will be their default environment but they are going to offer a KDE Plasma option -- the first time they have offered an alternate desktop option. They would like to make it an option to select at install-time what desktop is preferred by the user, but due to size/packaging constraints, they may end up offering two separate ISOs.

Read more

Direct/source: Plans for Ubuntu Studio 18.10 – Cosmic Cuttlefish

KDE: Krita and Plasma

Filed under
KDE
  • My First Post!

    I’m Michael, a students taking part in this year’s GSoC. I am working on improving the “palette” docker for Krita.

    Finally I’ve got something that’s almost a blog set up. Hopefully it’s set up. This post is a test.

    Krita is the first open source project I have contributed to, so I don’t really know the ecosystem of the open source world. When I heard that should be posting blogs on Planet KDE, I thought it would be like posting on some online forum. Sign up, log in, and post. I later realized it’s not that simple…

    All right. I am going to do some web stuff some day. I can make today that day. As a result, I now have a super ugly Github Pages blog. But it will become prettier one day.

    Back to my GSoC project. You can find the descriptions here.

  • [Krita] Interview with El Gato Cangrejo

    The performance in Linux, I recently changed my OS from Windows 7 to Linux Mint and I have noticed a significant difference in performance between the systems. I noticed a difference in performance between working in grayscale and working in color too, and and also I’m waiting for some layer FX’s as the ones in photoshop, specifically the trace effect, which I used a lot when I worked with photoshop.

  • Plasma Sprint in Berlin

    Last month the developers of Plasma, KDE's featureful, flexible and Free desktop environment, held a sprint in Berlin, Germany. The developers gathered to discuss the forthcoming 5.13 release and future development of Plasma. Of course, they didn't just sit and chat - a lot of coding got done, too.

    During the sprint, the Plasma team was joined by guests from Qt and Sway WM. Discussion topics included sharing Wayland protocols, input methods, Plasma Browser Integration, tablet mode for Plasma's shell, porting KControl modules to QtQuick, and last but not least, the best beer in Berlin.

  • KDE Plasma Developers Collaborating With Sway On Wayland Support

    A KDE Plasma development sprint recently happened in Berlin. One of the most interesting takeaways out of that event was the collaboration with the lead Sway developer, the increasingly popular i3-compatible Wayland compositor.

    Drew DeVault who leads Sway's development and also the wlroots Wayland library attended the KDE Plasma sprint to begin talks of collaborating with KDE developers on Wayland support.

    He was talking with the Plasma crew about collaboration over Wayland protocols, bouncing around of ideas between projects, and also discussing matters like remote access support for Wayland.

Akademy-es in Valencia and Debian Women in Curitiba

Filed under
KDE
Debian
  • A weekend at Akademy-es in Valencia

    This past weekend I travelled to Valencia, the third biggest city in Spain, located by the Mediterranean sea, to attend to Akademy-es, the annual meeting of the KDE community in Spain. At this event we also hold the KDE Spain annual assembly.

    KDE España is the legal entity behind the KDE community in Spain and legally represents KDE in my country. We are about 30 members and it was founded in 2009 although Akademy-es started a few years earlier.

  • Renata D'Avila: Debian Women in Curitiba

    At MiniDebConf Curitiba last year, few women attended. And, as I mentioned on a previous post, there was not even a single women speaking at MiniDebConf last year.

    I didn't want MiniDebConf Curitiba 2018 to be a repeat of last year. Why? In part, because I have involved in other tech communities and I know it doesn't have to be like that (unless, of course, the community insists in being mysoginistic...).

    So I came up with the idea of having a meeting for women in Curitiba one month before MiniDebConf. The main goal was to create a good enviroment for women to talk about Debian, whether they had used GNU/Linux before or not, whether they were programmers or not.

    Miriam and Kira, two other women from the state of Parana interested in Debian, came along and helped out with planning. We used a collaborative pad to organize the tasks and activities and to create the text for the folder about Debian we had printed (based on Debian's documentation).

KDE: KDE Connect, Management of LVM VGs in Calamares and More

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Connect Junior Jobs

    One of KDE’s Community goals for the next years is streamlined onboarding of new contributors. It’s very important that new people regularly join the community for various reasons. First of all, there will always be something to do and the more contributors the merrier! But there are also people becoming very inactive or leaving the community and these people need to be replaced. Furthermore new people bring in new and fresh ideas. It’s important to have people from diverse backgrounds in the community.

  • Management of LVM VGs in Calamares

    I talked in my last post about some of my LVM studies for the first goal of GSoC. This post is an addition to the last one, focused more in explaining how I want to implement it and talking a little bit about some application concepts from Calamares that I’ve studied.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 18

    Image operations in Gwenview that have been undone can now be re-done too (Peter Mühlenpfordt, KDE Applications 18.08.0)

KDE Frameworks 5.46.0

Filed under
KDE
  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.46.0

    KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.46.0.

    KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

    This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.46 As The Latest Add-Ons Update

    KDE Frameworks 5.46.0 is out today as the newest version of this collection of add-on libraries used by KDE applications and more for complementing the Qt5 tool-kit.

KDE: Kdenlive Sprint and Krita 4.0.3 Released

Filed under
KDE
  • Kdenlive Sprint - The Movie

    Kdenlive is KDE's advanced video-editor. This April, members of the Kdenlive project met up for five days - from 25th to the 29th - for their spring sprint. The developers Jean-Baptiste Mardelle and Nicolas Carion, along with professional community videomakers Farid Abdelnour, Rémi Duquenne and Massimo Stella, got together at the Carrefour Numérique in Paris to push the project forward.

  • Krita 4.0.3 Released

    Today the Krita team releases Krita 4.0.3, a bug fix release of Krita 4.0.0. This release fixes an important regression in Krita 4.0.2: sometimes copy and paste between images opened in Krita would cause crashes (BUG:394068).

KDE: FreeText, Modern C++ and Qt, KDE Partition Manager

Filed under
KDE
  • FreeText typewriter annotation WYSIWYG implementation ideas

    As a part of the GSoC project, I’m working with my mentor Tobias Deiminger on implementing the FreeText typewriter annotation with click-to-type WYSIWYG editing feature in Okular to write directly on PDF page.

  • Modern C++ and Qt – part 2.

    I recently did a short tongue-in-cheek blog post about Qt and modern C++. In the comments, people discovered that several compilers effectively can optimize std::make_unique<>().release() to a simple new statement, which was kind of a surprise to me.

    I have recently written a new program from scratch (more about that later), and I tried to force myself to use standard library smartpointers much more than what I normally have been doing.

  • Google Summer of Code 2018 – Community Bonding Part 2: Studies about LVM

    As I said in my previous post, I’m using this community bonding period to understand how LVM works in kpmcore. It involved studying about how the three parts of LVM (Physical Volumes, Volume Groups and Logical Volumes) work in the library and how this logic was implemented.

    In this text, I’m intending to give a short explanation about LVM, discuss about some plannings related to the process of creation of LVM VGs in Calamares and talk about some corrections related to it that I’ve implemented in kpmcore and KDE Partition Manager.

    [...]

    Community Bonding period is almost finishing, but I’ll write another post about it before that, talking a little bit about my studies involving RAID arrays and which are my ideas to implementing it. See you later!

KDE and GNOME: Cutelyst 2.3.0, Discovering Gwenview, First Look at GNOME’s Stylish New Login & Lock Screens

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Cutelyst 2.3.0 released

    Cutelyst – The C++ Web Framework built with Qt, has a new release.

    In this release a behavior change was made, when asking for POST or URL query parameters and cookies that have multiple keys the last inserted one (closer to the right) is returned, previously QMap was filled in reverse order so that values() would have them in left to right order. However this is not desired and most other frameworks also return the last inserted value. To still have the ordered list Request::queryParameters(“key”) builds a list in the left to right order (while QMap::values() will have them reversed).

    Some fixes on FastCGI implementation as well as properly getting values when uWSGI FastCGI protocol was in use.

  • Discovering the Gwenview photo viewer

    The Gwenview photo viewer is a great application and one of the reasons why I never looked back when I switched from Windows (Vista) to openSUSE (11.1). The application is installed by default when you install openSUSE with the KDE plasma desktop environment. But even if you have the GNOME desktop environment installed, I would recommend that you to install Gwenview. In my opinion, it is superior to the GNOME image viewer application.

    Default applications often get overlooked. We just expect them to be there. But there are big differences when it comes to default applications. Take for instance the GNOME image viewer or Windows Photo Viewer. You can do a couple of basic things like zoom in, zoom out and move from photo to photo. You can put it in full screen mode and go back. And of course you can open, save, print and close photos. But that is basically it. Gwenview does a lot more.

    So lets get to it. There are basically 2 ways to open Gwenview. The first way is to (double) click a photo in the Dolphin file manager (another great default application). The second way is to open Gwenview via the kickoff menu, by typing in the name in the search box or by looking at the Graphics section of the menu.

  • First Look: GNOME’s Stylish New Login & Lock Screens

    GNOME devs are working on an improved GNOME Shell login and lock screen — and it’s looking great!

    Sharing images of the proposed new lock, unlock and login screen designs on his blog is GNOME’s Allan Day, who says the redesigns are the fruits of a week-long design hackfest GNOME held in London last year.

Krita 4.0.2 released

Filed under
KDE

Today the Krita team releases Krita 4.0.2, a bug fix release of Krita 4.0.0. We fixed more than fifty bugs since the Krita 4.0.0 release! See below for the full list of fixed isses. We’ve also got fixes submitted by two new contributors: Emmet O’Neil and Seoras Macdonald. Welcome!

Read more

Lubuntu, Kubuntu & Xubuntu Might Also Drop Support for New 32-Bit Installations

Filed under
KDE

As you know, at the very beginning of the Ubuntu 18.10 cycle, maintainers of the Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Budgie, and Ubuntu Studio official flavors have decided to no longer support 32-bit ISO images. But now it looks like Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, and Ubuntu Kylin might be joining them soon.

"With Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Budgie, and Ubuntu Studio joining Ubuntu Desktop and Server in not offering i386 support in order to focus their efforts, and these statistics in mind, we (flavors) should all join them," said Canonical's Bryan Quigley. "Now is the ideal time to do so."

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Here Is What's New In Fedora 28

For those who don't know about this Linux distro, Fedora is one of those Linux distributions that comes released with cutting-edge software rather than staying on the same boat with other distributions that prefers stability. Fedora comes in three flavors: Workstation, Server, and Atomic. I'll be reviewing Fedora Workstation; used by many developers and users as their general purpose computing platform. Read
more

Stable kernels 4.16.11, 4.14.43 and 4.9.102

today's leftovers

Software: Grafana, Heaptrack, Vim

  • Grafana – An Open Source Software for Analytics and Monitoring
    Grafana is an open source, feature rich, powerful, elegant and highly-extensible analytics and monitoring software that runs on Linux, Windows and MacOS. It is a de facto software for data analytics, being used at Stack Overflow, eBay, PayPal, Uber and Digital Ocean – just to mention but a few. It supports 30+ open source as well as commercial databases/data sources including MySQL, PostgreSQL, Graphite, Elasticsearch, OpenTSDB, Prometheus and InfluxDB. It allows you to dig deeply into large volumes of real-time, operational data; visualize, query, set alerts and get insights from your metrics from differen
  • Heaptrack v1.1.0 release
    Better memory profiling on Linux After more than a year of work, I’m pleased to release another version of heaptrack, the Linux memory profiler! The new version 1.1.0 comes with some new features, significant performance improvements and – most importantly – much improved stability and correctness. If you have tried version v1.0 in the past and encountered problems, update to the new v1.1 and try again!
  • Ten Years of Vim
     

    The philosophy behind Vim takes a while to sink in: While other editors focus on writing as the central part of working with text, Vim thinks it's editing.

     

    You see, most of the time I don't spend writing new text; instead, I edit existing text.

  •