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KDE

Evolving KDE: Lehman’s Laws of Software Evolution In The Community

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KDE

The board of KDE eV has launched a new initiative to ensure that KDE remains awesome and relevant for the foreseeable future. Unlike previous approaches it is not a point-in-time solution, it is a continuous process of improvement. And it is a good thing.

Previously, I have written/spoken a lot about the role of Brooks’ Law in the context of Free Software. Brooks’ Law teaches us to be careful about the management of growth in our communities. Especially treated in consideration with the grossly under appreciated Conway’s Law. There are, of course, other laws of Software Engineering that apply to Free Software development.

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Evolving KDE

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KDE

KDE began its life as a desktop project and Qt showcase back in 1996. Since then KDE has evolved to become something more significant; the modern KDE is a global community of technologists, designers, writers and advocates producing some of the world’s finest user-centric Free Software. As we have evolved, so too has the world around us. The user’s experience is no longer restricted to the desktop. It has expanded to the user’s hands, wrists, glasses and more and will continue to evolve into areas we have yet to imagine.

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Kdenlive 15.04.0 released

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KDE
Software
Movies

The Kdenlive team is happy to announce the release of Kdenlive 15.04.0. While there are very few new features in this release, it is a huge step towards a bright future!

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Leftovers: KDE

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KDE
  • A Purpose for everything

    When we were porting Kamoso to Qt5/KF5, at some point I realized that it was about time we came up with whatever we’d want to do with sharing. Kipi is definitely an interesting technology, but no matter how I looked at it I found that it missed an iteration in the concept. In some aspects it’s very specific, in some others very broad. In fact, I already tried to improve it, back in 2009.

  • Qt on Android Episode 6

    In the last Qt on Android episode we learned the basics of JNI on Android in a Qt way. In this episode I’d like to focus on tools that will help us to be more productive when we extend our Qt on Android applications.

I like Plasma 5

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KDE

Yes, you read that well. I’m a hardcore Gnome user since… 2002 and I don’t really to switch to KDE/Plasma just yet. However, I just wanted to share some of my thoughts concerning Plasma, the new name of the KDE desktop. Plasma 5 is the brand new KDE desktop, coming after the KDE 4.x series and only a handful of distributions have picked up on it. As it were, you could already install and run Plasma 5 on Arch Linux since about January 2015 and a bit earlier I think but as I was reporting here, I was busy with my new laptop and getting progressively into emacs; as such I did not pay much attention to it. During FOSDEM however I noticed Plasma 5 at the KDE and OpenSuse booths and I spent a minute standing there: I really liked what I was looking at, but I was thinking that some sort of heavy theming of the KDE desktop had been going on for the event.

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KDE Plasma 5.3 Beta Arrives With Improved Power Management Features

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KDE

Kubuntu 15.04, due later this month, will be the first stable release of the distro to ship with the new KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment as default.

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9 reasons to use KDE

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KDE

I really like the command line interface (CLI) in Linux. It bestows great power upon its users, and I spend a good deal of time availing myself of those powers. And yet without the GUI desktop I would still be limited. It is through the combination of the GUI and the command line that I find the power of Linux to be more fully realized.

As with many things in Linux, there are several choices available for desktops. A short list includes Xfce, MATE, Cinnamon, LXDE, GNOME, KDE, and for the kids, Sugar. I have tried all of these at various times over the years, and I always install all of them on my main workstation so that I can try out the latest versions of each. But despite the fact that all of these desktops have many good features, I always return to KDE.

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Plasma 5.3 Beta Improves Power Management and Adds Media Centre Preview

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KDE

Today KDE releases a beta release of Plasma 5, versioned 5.2.95.

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Review: Sabayon 15.02 KDE

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KDE
Reviews

This weekend has been a little slower than usual for work, so I have a little more time to do a review. Several weeks ago, I downloaded the latest version of Sabayon and kept it for a time (as now) when I'd be free to do a review. Moreover, looking through the archives of this blog, I realized that it's been almost 3 years since I've looked at Sabayon, so a fresh review is long overdue.

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KDE Frameworks 5.9.0 Officially Released with Plasma Framework Improvements

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KDE

KDE announced the immediate availability of KDE Frameworks 5.9.0, a collection of over 60 add-on libraries for the Qt 5.x GUI toolkit that can be used by KDE developers to create applications and core components for the famous KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

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