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KDE

Leftovers: KDE

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KDE

Improved input device support in KWin/Wayland

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KDE

One of the areas I’m currently working on is improving our support for input devices in KWin. While general usage is already quite good in Plasma 5.6, we are not yet able to configure the input devices. This is something I’m working on to improve for Plasma 5.7.

Input devices are provided by libinput and KWin integrates with that for quite some time. What it didn’t do yet is to configure them and keep track of them.

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Qt Creator 4.0.0 released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.0.0. Starting with this release, we are making the Clang static analyzer integration, extended QML profiler features and auto test integration (experimental) available under open source. The previously commercial-only connection editor and path editor of Qt Quick Designer were already open sourced with Qt Creator 3.6.0. Qt Creator is now available under commercial license and GPLv3 (with exceptions). The exceptions ensure that there are no license restrictions on generated code, and that bridging to 3rd party code is still possible. You can read more about this change in the blog post announcing it.

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KDE Plasma 5.6.4 Desktop Environment Launches with Plasma Discover Improvements

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KDE

After announcing the availability of the KDE Applications 16.04.1 software suite, KDE today, May 10, 2016, also started seeding the fourth point release of the KDE Plasma 5.6 desktop environment to stable users.

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KDE Applications 16.04 Gets Its First Point Release, Includes Over 25 Bug Fixes

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KDE
Security

Today, May 10, 2016, KDE has announced the general availability of the first point release in the latest stable and most advanced KDE Applications 16.04 series of the software suite used for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

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Leftovers: Software and KDE

Filed under
KDE
Software
  • Vivaldi Browser Is a Breath of Fresh Air

    The Vivaldi browser provides a refreshing approach to traveling along the Internet. It offers something beyond the same old thing in a different skin.

    Vivaldi is the brainchild of former Opera CEO Jon von Tetzchner. The developers built the Vivaldi browser on top of Chromium, which is open source, but added their own proprietary skins.

  • Krita “Next” – Development releases for Fedora 23, 24, rawhide, and Epel 7 ( Centos 7 and RHEL 7 )

    After Krita moved to Qt5 and KDE Frameworks, it moved from the Calligra repository to their own repository.

  • One year ago…

    A paper that might be more interesting for you is the one about “KDE as an example of a Free Software community” from a social-educational perspective. In the appendix you find 9 longish IRC interviews with different people from the KDE community. There you might find some interesting insights and different perspectives.

  • Starting from the shore of cosmic ocean

    Right now I struggle to make Options class available for use from QML because for some reason I get an error while compiling config files with support for QML so I wrote an e-mail to one of the developers of KConfig compiler asking how can I solve this problem.

  • Reordering a Qt Quick ListView via drag'n'drop - part 3

Third Krita Kickstarter

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KDE
  • Let’s make Text and Vectors Awesome: 2016 Kickstarter

    Last year, our backers funded a big performance improvement in the form of the Instant Preview feature and wickedly cool animation support, right in the core of Krita. And a bunch of stretch goals, some of which are already implemented in 3.0, some of which will come in Krita 3.1.

  • Krita 2016 Kickstarter: Let's Make Text and Vector Art Awesome

    Today we kick off the third Krita kickstarter! It's beginning to become a tradition. Last year, our Kickstarter backers funded the development of performance improvements and animation support -- and a bunch of other features. Right now, we're still working on finishing up the Krita 3.0 release before we implement the last of the stretch goals you all helped fund last year.

  • [Krita] Interview with Toby Willsmer

    Sure, I am originally from the UK but now live in New Zealand. At 44 I have been drawing and illustrating for over 20 years but currently only for myself. I have a love of comics and graphic novels which is pretty much the style I have inherited over the years. By day I’m a Front End Developer and by night I like to let my mind run riot and then draw it.

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Pre-GSoC work: Researching color deficiencies.

    So, while the 2016 Google Summer of Code hasn’t officially started yet, and Krita’s master is in feature freeze till the release at the end of the month, it’s a good moment to start preparing.

  • Akademy 2016 travel support

    If you want to attend Akademy 2016 but are a bit short on money, that is no excuse Smile

  • Plasma Wayland Images Go Daily
  • New [Krita] Development Builds Ready

    There are new development builds ready, with a bunch of bug fixes since the last beta. Please test thoroughly, we’re getting really close to the second beta!

  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-alpha1 (0.6.0.90)

    Quick update on the next bugfix release for the KBibTeX 0.6 series: KBibTeX 0.6.1-beta1 (0.6.0.90) has just been released. Differences to the alpha version from two weeks ago are two minor bug fixes and updated translations for Galician and Italian (thanks!).

  • Kubuntu: Debian: KDE: Outreachy! Yay! Upcoming changes

    Some of you in the Debian community might know me from working with the debian-qt-kde team

  • Google Summer of Code 2016 – KDE – WikiToLearn

    All these days, I was spending most of my time fixing bugs on different open source projects. Now I have got the opportunity to work with WikiToLearn, a proud member of KDE community, for a long period of time, implementing a new feature to wiki editor.

  • #22: GSoC with KDE – 1
  • UbuntuBuzz Ebook #1 KDE Edition Published

    We are pleased to announce our first edition of UbuntuBuzz Thematic Ebook KDE Edition. This is a second ebook publication of us after the UbuntuBuzz Magazine, because we want our readers take more advantages from our articles. We hope this KDE edition helps everyone uses KDE. As usual, you may download our ebook free (gratis) by direct link.

KDE Neon Plasma Wayland Daily Build ISOs Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Are Now Live

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KDE

Ex-Kubuntu leader Jonathan Riddell announced the availability of daily build ISO images for the rolling KDE Neon Linux operating system, which early adopters can get and test drive as we speak.

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Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE's Project Neon Begins Publishing Daily Wayland Images

    KDE --
    KDE's Project Neon has begun publishing daily images of the latest KDE Plasma stack powered atop Wayland rather than the X.Org Server.

    Jonathan Riddell passed along word that daily ISOs are now being spun of the freshest KDE development code with KWin acting as a Wayland compositor. The OS base is still Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

  • The Qt Company's Qt Start-Up

    The Qt Company is proud to offer a new version of the Qt for Application Development package called Qt Start-Up, the company's C++-based framework of libraries and tools that enables the development of powerful, interactive and cross-platform applications and devices. Now used by around one million developers worldwide, the Qt Company seeks to expand its user base by targeting smaller enterprises.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Handling I/O Bursts With QEMU 2.6
    The recent release of QEMU 2.6 has support for allowing guests to do bursts of I/O for a configurable amount of time, whereby the I/O level exceeds the normally allowed limits. Our friends at the consulting firm Igalia have written a blog post about I/O bursts with QEMU 2.6.
  • Shotwell's New Devs Are Doing a Terrific Job, Facebook Integration Works Again
    Shotwell developer Jens Georg announced earlier, May 23, 2016, the general availability of the first point release in the Shotwell 0.23.x stable series of the popular open-source image viewer and organizer software. Shotwell is being used by default in numerous GNU/Linux operating system, including the widely used Ubuntu, but it was abandoned by its developers from the Yorba Foundation a while ago, during which it didn't receive any attention. At the end of April 2016, a group of open source developers decided to take over the maintenance of Shotwell from where Yorba left off, and we already reported on the release of the major Shotwell 0.23.0 version.
  • FreeIPMI 1.5.2 Released

today's howtos

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Apache Elevates TinkerPop Graph Computing Framework to Top Level
    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions. Now, the foundation has announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. "Graph databases and mainstream interest in graph applications have seen tremendous growth in recent years," said Stephen Mallette, Vice President of Apache TinkerPop. "Since its inception in 2009, TinkerPop has been helping to promote that growth with its Open Source graph technology stack. We are excited to now do this same work as a top-level project within the Apache Software Foundation."
  • Why a Buffer developer open sourced his code
    If you look for the official definition of open source, you'll likely stumble upon this outline from the board members of the Open Source Initiative. If you skim through it, you're sure to find some idea or concept that you feel very aligned with. At its heart, openness (and open source) is about free distribution—putting your work out there for others to use. It's really about helping others and giving back. ​When we started to think about open source and how we could implement it at Buffer, the fit seemed not only natural, but crucial to how we operate. In fact, it seemed that in a lot of ways we'd be doing ourselves a disservice if we didn't start to look more seriously at it. But what I didn't quite realize at the time were all the effects that open source would have on me.
  • How to make a culture change at your company
    I attended an interesting talk by Barry O'Reilly at the Cultivate pre-conference at OSCON 2016 about "how to push through change in an enterprise." Though I think the title should have been: "What the enterprise can learn from open source."
  • Two OSCON Conversations, And A Trip Report Between Them
    My last visit to OSCON was in 2011, when I had worked for the Wikimedia Foundation for under a year, and wanted to build and strengthen relationships with the MediaWiki and PHP communities. I remember not feeling very successful, and thinking that this was a conference where executives and engineers (who in many cases are not terribly emotionally passionate about open source) meet to hire, get hired, and sell each other things.
  • Struggling to open a document or photo? Here’s how to do it
    Things are a bit trickier if you have a file from a productivity application you don’t have access to —such as a Word document and no Word application, either to open it or re-save it. The solution is still simple, though — download Libre Office. Libre Office is a free and fully functional office suite that’s more than a match for Microsoft Office, and it can open (and save in) Office file formats.
  • OpenBSD/loongson on the Lemote Yeeloong 8101B
    After hunting for Loongson based hardware for the first half of 2015, I was finally able to find an used Yeeloong in July, in very good condition. Upon receiving the parcel, the first thing I did was to install OpenBSD on this exquisitely exotic machine.
  • Call for GIMP 2.10 Documentation Update
    With the upcoming GIMP 2.10 release we intend to finally close the time gap between releases of source code, installers, and the user manual. This means that we need a more coordinated effort between the GIMP developers team and the GIMP User Manual team. For the past several months we’ve already been working on GIMP mostly in bugfix mode. It’s time to start updating the user manual to match all the changes in GIMP 2.10, and we would appreciate your help with that.
  • Mobile Age project: making senior citizens benefit from open government data
    On 1 February 2016, ten European partners launched the Mobile Age project. Aiming to develop inclusive mobile access to public services using open government data, Mobile Age targets a group of citizens that are usually marginalised when it comes to technical innovations but which is rapidly growing in number and expectations: European senior citizens. While more and more public services are made available online only, older persons’ needs and wishes towards digital services are rarely understood and taken in account. This deficit is often exacerbated by their lower digital skills and poor access to the internet. In order to cope with this, Mobile Age is based on the concept of co-creation: it will develop mobile open government services that are created together with senior citizens.
  • Protecting IP in a 3D printed future
    3D printing might just change everything. At least John Hornick, who leads Finnegan’s 3D printing working group and wrote 3D Printing Will Rock the World, certainly thinks so. Introduced by Bracewell Giuliani’s Erin Hennessy, Hornick spoke to INTA registrants yesterday morning about the dramatic consequences he believes the proliferation of 3D printing could have for intellectual property.