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KDE

Ring-KDE 3.0.0 has been released

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KDE

It has been some time. I come back from the shadows to announce the release of Ring-KDE 3.0.0, A GNU Ring.cx client. GNU Ring is a secure and distributed communication platform based on open standards. It weaves industry standard technologies to work together and provides audio calls, video conferences, chat, screen sharing and peer to peer file transfer between you and your friends. Additionally, its use of open standards allows to bridge to various other systems like the main phone network or SIP compatible devices.

When joining the GNU Ring, no servers or centralized accounts are needed. Beside an optional blockchain-based way to reserve your username against takeover, nothing leaves your device. All your data is kept under your control. Ring-KDE provides a simple wizard to help you create credentials or import your personal information from other devices.

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Also: Ring-KDE 3.0 Released To Use The GNU's Distributed Communication Platform

KDE GSoc and Akademy

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KDE

11 Best Linux Desktop Environments And Their Comparison

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GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME

Linux is all about what you want and having it from the ocean of free and open source software. The same applies while performing a comparison of desktop environments as they comprise of different applications and a GUI via which the user interacts with the operating system. Just like a plethora of Linux-based free operating systems, are many options available and our list of best Linux desktop environment and their comparison includes the likes of KDE, Cinnamon, Xfce, GNOME, etc.

The Linux world is full of open source software. You have the option of choosing from hundreds of distributions and customize them as per your will. No one slaps you with a copyright even if you change the source code of a distro to fork your Linux distro and release it with a new name. That’s the beauty of free software and open source. Only one thing the creators may ask you is to give them proper credits because they have also invested their efforts and time. Well, that’s a different story.

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KDE: KDE Neon, GSoC, KStars and Akademy!

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KDE
  • KDE neon Bionic Preview Images Available for Testing

    Our QA tests have turned green which means we have switched on the preview publishing for the KDE neon Installable Images based on Bionic.

  • KDE Neon Powered By Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Now Available For Testing

    Fans of KDE Neon relying upon this OS/package-set for experiencing the latest and greatest KDE innovations can now enjoy it paired with an Ubuntu 18.04 "Bionic Beaver" base.

    KDE Neon maintainers have begun publishing their preview images of Neon based upon the "Bionic" (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) packages. Up until now Neon has remained based against the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS packages. This now gets you the newer Ubuntu packages with a fresh kernel, Mesa, etc, while still being able to enjoy the bleeding-edge KDE packages not found otherwise in Ubuntu 18.04. Neon continues being offered in various forms ranging from using KDE stable releases up through Git unstable branch builds, depending upon you tolerate risk.

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  • KDE Had A Very Successful Google Summer of Code 2018

    Google Summer of Code 2018 is quickly reaching an end. We'll be featuring some of the interesting and successful work accomplished this summer by these students engaging in hundreds of different open-source projects. One of the open-source projects slotted with a lot of participants this year was KDE.

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  • GSoC Fwupd Integration in KDE Discover (Phase – III)

    Hey everyone, one more month has passed now, Fwupd-Backend is now finally merged in discover master branch, though it took quite a number of changes. This post will relatively small as in the past month I have worked mainly on fixing the mistakes and improving the code and getting it merged.

  • Enable localization for KStars on Android

    As a first KDE application, KStars got localization working on Android. KStars has the traditional gettext translations in the KDE system and these translations had to be downloaded, converted and packaged inside the apk.

  • Aurelien Gateau going to Akademy!

    So after a (too long) break, I am going back to Akademy this year! Having been away from KDE work for a while now, this will be the first time I attend the conference as a user. It's going to be interesting to see how this feels. In any case, I am looking forward to the sessions and to catching up with old friends.

    I will only be attending the first two days unfortunately, but I will try to make the best of these days to meet as many people as possible.

  • I am going to Akademy!

    So, After a month-long delay, I finally managed to got my VISA approved, it was a really close call. I reached the VISA agency, today for receiving my application and after opening the application, I saw my visa on my passport! So yes I am coming to Akademy, this will be my first Akademy to attend, I am really excited to meet my mentors and all the people who make KDE awesome Big Grin. Looking forward to attend, all the events, workshop and see the beautiful Vienna city!

Events: KDE’s Akademy 2018 and DevConf India 2018

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KDE
OSS
  • Chakra at KDE’s Akademy 2018

    We’ll be participating and presenting Chakra in the KDE Distro BoF, where there will be “short introductions for GNU/Linux distributions and open discussion on distribution-related topics”.

  • The State of Akademy Sponsorship

    Akademy 2018 is less than a week away. Apart from meeting up again with friends and colleagues, the KDE community has another reason to be joyful: this year we have broken the record for the number of sponsors for the event. Although there have been many sponsors of Akademy over the years, never have there been so many at one time.

    Eike Hein, Treasurer of the KDE e.V. board, believes that the extra influx of sponsors is thanks to "KDE software being loved again." Eike points out that Plasma is reaching more kinds of devices every day, attracting larger communities and more hardware manufacturers -- some of which will be at Akademy this year. KDE applications are also becoming more mainstream and reaching larger audiences. Krita and Kdenlive, for example, are making inroads within the community of graphical artists, raising awareness of KDE in a whole new sector of end users. Kirigami is becoming the go-to framework for projects that need convergence on desktop and mobile devices.

    "I would also attribute the increase in support to the fact that KDE actively engages with partners" says Eike. A case in point is the Advisory Board. The Advisory Board makes organization-to-organization interaction more rewarding and helps build a stronger network of like-minded Free Software associations and companies. Through the Advisory Board, KDE can better reach and support a larger communities, which in turn reinforces KDE's position within Free Software.

  • DevConf India 2018

    DevConf IN was organized at Christ University, Bangalore 05/06 August. It turned out to be totally fun-packed excited weekend for me. I really had a great time meeting people from various other open source communitites from India. I also delivered a talk on Flatpak mainly focusing on overall architecture, it’s benefits for the user and developers.

  • DevConf India-2018

KDE: Kube, Communities Size and Activity, KDE Discover

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KDE
  • Kube: new website, new flatpak

    What comes with it though is that we’ll also be publishing the flatpak and Mac OS nightlies there from now on. The CI that is building those nightlies will be integrated eventually, but that job is not complete just yet.

  • Musing About Communities Size and Activity: A Follow-up

    In my previous post I played with the team size and activity metrics on several communities and see what would come out of it. Interestingly, to me this wasn't necessarily the most interesting of what I posted (it's rather basic in what it presents) but somehow it's the one which triggered the most comments, especially in the KDE community. Looks like I struck a nerve. Smile

    Anyway, it got quite a lot of good comments, so I thought it deserved a follow-up post with a different tone. For the record, I generally try to avoid putting too much of my own personal opinion in posts where I present metrics. I think it's sane to try to shield facts on the data from my biased position. It's obviously super hard, if not impossible. Indeed, at a minimum I'm forced to mention potential events in the time frame considered (if I know them)... it's risky, but still I do it because otherwise things would be just very dry and super annoying to read! And I think that's why the previous post struck a nerve, but more on that below.

  • KDE Discover Gets Fwupd Integration For Handling Firmware Updates

    While GNOME Software has long offered integration with Fwupd for offering firmware upgrades on supported devices, KDE Discover has now received similar functionality.

    Being worked on this summer by Abhijeet Sharma as a Google Summer of Code (GSoC 18) project is a fwupd back-end for Discover to handle firmware updating. Firmware upgrades can now happen via Fwupd while integrating nicely with Discover and offering notifications on new upgrades being available. Details on the effort can be found via this KDE GSoC Wiki page.

KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop Environment Lets You Upgrade Your Computer's Firmware

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KDE

One of the coolest new features of the KDE Plasma 5.14 desktop environment, as developer Nate Graham notes in his latest usability and productivity report, is the ability to upgrade your computer's firmware through the Plasma Discover graphical package manager, which is installed by default and helps KDE Plasma users update their GNU/Linux distributions and KDE applications.

The ability to upgrade your computer’s firmware recently landed in the Plasma Discover package manager and was implemented by developer Abjiheet Sharma. KDE Plasma 5.14 looks to be the first release of the open-source desktop environment to ship with this features, as it doesn't look like it will be backported to Plasma 5.13.

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KDE: Krita, Akademy, and Community

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KDE
  • Krita Interview with Serhii

    I wish the team of developers to continue their fantastic work on the creation of this application and I want to see how many more artists use Krita for their creativity and making artworks.

  • Akademy Program is now Friend Mobile!

    However, this past week I’ve been working again with Web Development, and created a Progressive Web App for Akademy.

    The web page of Akademy isn’t friend mobile, so I used Vue.JS, and it’s framework Quasar, to create the app.

  • Adriaan de Groot: One does not simply walk into Møn

    And now after 710km on the bike I’m back in the Netherlands, preparing for Akademy and gently poking Calamares to see if it will wake up from slumber.

  • Adriaan de Groot: Going to Deventer^WVienna^WAkademy

    Akademy is, for me, first and foremost a way to see everyone again and re-calibrate my social settings for everyone. After all, I communicate with most KDE people only electronically, though text, and it’s sometimes really important to see the faces behind the IRC nicknames. So I’m particularly excited that Michael Pyne will be there, who has been a voice in KDE for as long as I care to remember, but whom I’ve never actually met. And there will be lots of GSoC students there, new people who deserve all the support they can get — and commendations for the work they have done in KDE this year.

  • In my heart

    We can only do that last bit well with a healthy KDE community. This means uniting around our goals, contributing to the community along with the software; by creating good documentation, helping promote news, contributing timely information for release announcements, joining a working group or the e.V. itself and most important: living up to our Code of Conduct. Our Code of Conduct is one of the best and most positive in free software, and is a key reason I came to KDE and stayed to contribute. It is of little value, however, unless we occasionally re-read it and resolve to personally hold ourselves to a high standard of conduct, and in addition, daring to step up to help resolve situations where it requires courage to do so.

    [...]

    It is sometimes very difficult and discouraging to confront distressing situations, when those whom you respect and even love deeply disappoint. However if we are to grow and thrive as a family, and we are a huge family, this must be done.

KDE: PIM Sprint 2018, Distributing Qt-based Software, Usability & Productivity

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KDE
  • KDE PIM Sprint 2018

    Attending the yearly KDE Pim Sprint in April in Toulouse was nice. For me it is often leaving a cold rainy Germany and arriving warm, almost summer weather with a lot of sun. This time the weather in Germany was also sunny and warm when I left, but spring's always further in Toulouse. As only around ten people attended the sprint, it was also a time to get to know the people behind the nicknames. Unfortunately there were no new faces this time, but a new contributor joined the Pim team and attended remotely.

    As the trains from Germany to Toulouse take some time, for me, the sprint normally starts with entering the train and having time to hack. The first things I looked at, were some cleanups in the dependency chain in KDE Pim, by moving stuff around.

    Reaching Toulouse, David and I started to dig into the problem, that sometimes connections to remote servers stall and nothing goes back and forth without an error being triggered. This issue is only visible if the internet connection is not stable, like a connection while riding the train. Yes, it's a good thing that sometime developers have to face real world, to be able to reproduce bugs. To solve these issues we first had to reproduce them, which leads into the problem of how to reproduce an unstable internet connection. It took a while before we had a setup running to reproduce the issue and after a lot of trial and error, we finally managed to fix the issues we'd found.

  • Distributing Qt application using Qt Installer framework

    Qt installer framework is a collection of tools that can be used to make installers on Linux, Windows and Mac . You can either use pre-built versions or compile it from source.

    There are other softwares like NSIS, installBuilder that can be used to make installers but I wanted an open source & cross platform tool therefore I chose Qt installer framework and it’s also fun to try out new things.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 30

    Akademy is next week (I will be there!), but that didn’t stop us from plugging away on the Usability and Productivity initiative!

KDE: Akademy and KDE's KTextEditor

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KDE
  • Going to Akademy!

    I will be attending my first Akademy this year and I am really excited about it. Thank you KDE e.V board for sponsoring me

  • KDE Free Qt Foundation at Akademy 2018

    I am really happy that this year, I am able to attend Akademy again.

    This enables me to set up a BOF session. It is intended for members of the KDE community who are interested in KDE’s collaboration with Qt. We will talk about the KDE Free Qt Foundation (legal setup; history and future; perspectives: What is important for the KDE community going forward?)

    A cordial invitation to all KDEers! – Tuesday, 14 August, 9:30

    It is great that many people from the Qt Company will also be at Akademy, so we will have a number of in-person meetings.

    And of course, I can personally report on our activities of the KDE Free Qt Foundation during the General Annual Meeting of KDE e.V. (Below you can also read our formal report for the past year.)

  • Porting KTextEditor to KSyntaxHighlighting – Folding

    After fixing some first porting bugs to KSyntaxHighlighting, code folding (non-indentation based) is back working, too.

    There is a still a lot to do (and e.g. the syntax colors are still kind of randomized), but already all KTextEditor original highlighting code is gone without ending up in an unusable state.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • 8 hurdles IT must overcome if they want open source success
    Open source software has the potential to drive innovation and collaboration across an enterprise, and can transform the way developers work together. "Open source is now part of the evaluation criteria when deciding on a software platform, so much so that it is expected," said Matt Ingenthron, senior director of engineering at Couchbase. "In this way, open source has somewhat faded into the background in a positive way. Just like no consumer would inquire if a mobile phone had internet access or text messaging, choosing an open source solution is almost always an option."
  • Sprint calls on open source analytics to prevent cyberfraud
    Mobile phone-related fraud is big business. Fraudsters, hackers, and other bad actors employ creative techniques to compromise networks, hijack user information, and piece together customer identities that are then sold for big bucks on the dark web. To protect its customers, Sprint needed to transform the way it detected and blocked fraudulent activity. “In the mobile phone business, there’s no markup on selling devices — our bread and butter is the network and the services that are delivered on that network, through the devices,” says Scott Rice, CIO of Sprint. “Identity theft is a huge problem and the ability for nefarious actors to use that theft of information to impersonate our customers means we were eating the costs of the devices and the costs of services delivery.”
  • Open Source Platform Delivers LDAP Integration
    The latest release of InfluxData, an open source platform for metrics, events, and other time series data, adds LDAP integration, new advanced analytics, and self-healing capabilities in the time series database platform. According to the company, time series data, collected and stored with InfluxData’s Time Series database platform is integral to observability and is becoming mission critical for organizations. Enhancements to InfluxEnterprise make it easier for administrators to keep this mission critical data available and secure by checking and verifying every requested action. This includes creating databases, storing data and running queries – against a user’s stored authorizations and role.
  • YOYOW-WeCenter Special Edition Release: Free and Open Source
    The YOYOW-WeCenter Special Edition, customized and developed by YOYOW and based on WeCenter Q&A community framework, has been released on GitHub. Compared to regular WeCenter frameworks, YOYOW is providing free open source services and will be continually iterating products and will be introducing an incentive mechanism. Each Q&A community can directly integrate into YOYOW's bottom layer network and enjoy the network services provided by YOYOW.
  • Add-on Recommended By Mozilla Caught Logging Users’ Browsing History
    According to the reports by Mike Kuketz, an independent security blogger from Germany and uBlock Origin, an add-on named “Web Security” has been caught collecting users’ browsing history. [...] Soon after this discovery by Hill, Kuketz added a post on his blog about the same extension pointing to the same strange behavior of the add-on. A user on Kuketz’s blog decoded the garbled data and found that the add-on was collecting users’ browsing history and sending it to a German server.
  • Zombies: Top 5 Open Source Vulnerabilities That Refuse To Die [Ed: Microsoft partner WhiteSource continues to stigmatise FOSS as a security nightmare, using bugs branded by other Microsoft partner for extra panic]
  • How a civic hacker used open data to halve tickets at Chicago's most confusing parking spot
    Matt Chapman used the Freedom of Information Act to get the City of Chicago's very mess parking ticket data; after enormous and heroic data normalization, Chapman was able to pinpoint one of the city's most confusing parking spots, between 1100-1166 N State St, which cycled between duty as a taxi-stand and a parking spot with a confusingly placed and semi-busted parking meter. After surveying the site and deducing the problem, Chapman contacted the alderman responsible for that stretch of North State Street, and, eight months later, the signage was cleaned up and made more intuitive. Followup data analysis showed that Chapman's work had halved the number of parking tickets issued on the spot, with 600-odd fewer tickets in the past 20 months, for a savings of $60,000 to Chicago motorists.
  • Bluespec, Inc. Releases a New Family of Open-Source RISC-V Processors
    Bluespec Inc. has released Piccolo, its first in a family of RISC-V open-source processors provided as a vehicle for open innovation in embedded systems. Piccolo is a 3-stage RV32IM processor whose small “footprint” is ideal for many IoT applications. The repository (https://github.com/bluespec/Piccolo) contains a royalty-free synthesizable Verilog core that can be easily integrated and deployed into an ASIC or FPGA. Bluespec, Inc. will actively maintain Piccolo. It also offers commercial-grade tools for the customization and verification of RISC-V cores. Configurations will be continually added to provide the full spectrum of embedded controller features. Companies or universities interested in contributing to the Piccolo project should contact Bluespec, Inc. (add contact – RISC-V open source support).

KDE Applications 18.08 Open-Source Software Suite Released, Here's What's New

Being in development for the past several months, KDE Applications 18.08 goes stable today and will hit the software repositories of various popular GNU/Linux distributions during the next few days. This is a major release and brings numerous new features and improvements across multiple apps, including Dolphin, Konsole, Gwenview, KMail, Akonadi, Cantor, Spectacle, and others. "We continuously work on improving the software included in our KDE Application series, and we hope you will find all the new enhancements and bug fixes useful," reads today's announcement. "More than 120 bugs have been resolved in applications including the Kontact Suite, Ark, Cantor, Dolphin, Gwenview, Kate, Konsole, Okular, Spectacle, Umbrello and more!" Read more

Security Leftovers

  • How to Protect Your PC From the Intel Foreshadow Flaws
  • AT&T Sued After SIM Hijacker Steals $24 Million in Customer's Cryptocurrency
    It has only taken a few years, but the press, public and law enforcement appear to finally be waking up to the problem of SIM hijacking. SIM hijacking (aka SIM swapping or a "port out scam") involves a hacker hijacking your phone number, porting it over to their own device (often with a wireless carrier employee's help), then taking control of your personal accounts. As we've been noting, the practice has heated up over the last few years, with countless wireless customers saying their entire identities were stolen after thieves ported their phone number to another carrier, then took over their private data. Sometimes this involves selling valuable Instagram account names for bitcoin; other times it involves clearing out the target's banking or cryptocurrency accounts. Case in point: California authorities recently brought the hammer down on one 20-year-old hacker, who had covertly ported more than 40 wireless user accounts, in the process stealing nearly $5 million in bitcoin. One of the problems at the core of this phenomenon is that hackers have either tricked or paid wireless carrier employees to aid in the hijacking, or in some instances appear to have direct access to (apparently) poorly-secured internal carrier systems. That has resulted in lawsuits against carriers like T-Mobile for not doing enough to police their own employees, the unauthorized access of their systems, or the protocols utilized to protect consumer accounts from this happening in the first place.
  • Voting Machine Vendors, Election Officials Continue To Look Ridiculous, As Kids Hack Voting Machines In Minutes
  • Security updates for Thursday