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KDE

This week in KDE: the Plasma 5.20 beta is here!

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KDE

Well folks, you finally have a chance to test out Plasma 5.21, in beta form! Please do install it and find all the bugs we missed. Bug reports have already started pouring in, and we’ll fix them as fast as we can in the next month.

[...]

Kate now has a searchable HUD-style command palette that lets you trigger menu items with super speed! It’s activated using the Ctrl+Alt+I shortcut, and we’re investigating adding it to other KDE apps as well in the form of a re-usable framework component.

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KDE Plasma 5.21 BETA Released. Download and Test Now.

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KDE
Linux
News

The KDE team announced the release of KDE Plasma 5.21 BETA and it is available for download and test. KDE Plasma 5.21 brings many new features such as a new kickoff menu, low-latency compositing, Wayland updates, new apps, and more. Here's what's new and how to download & test.
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KDE Plasma 5.21 Desktop Enters Beta, Here’s How to Test It Right Now

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KDE

Packed with numerous new features and improvements, the KDE Plasma 5.21 desktop environment promises a brand-new application launcher, a new dark theme for the Plasma desktop and a light theme for applications, a refreshed color scheme for all default KDE apps, as well as the highly-anticipated Plasma System Monitor app.

Of course, there will also be a lot of KWin and Wayland improvements that should reduce latency and smooth animations throughout the entire desktop environment, better compatibility with GTK applications, especially with apps written in GTK 4.

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Cutelyst 2.14.2 and ASql 0.27 released!

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KDE

Cutelyst a Qt Web Framework and ASql an asyncronous SQL library for Qt got new releases.

The Cutelyst version 2.14.0 was made in December but was a silent one, I had some issues in production but weren’t related to Cutelyst, the .1 release included some contributions by Adriaan de Groot, I also did some changes for Qt 5.15 and Qt6 but for Qt6 a new major version is needed.

Besides a bunch of fixes, a major regression on the plaintext benchmarks got fixed, unfourtunately not in time for round 20, but thanks to ASql you will Cutelyst got a better scoring on SQL related benchmarks.

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Krita 4.4.2 Released

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KDE

Today, the Krita team ihas released Krita 4.4.2. With over 300 changes, this is mainly a bugfix release, though some key new features, too!

Sharaf Zaman’s Google Summer of Code project has landed in this release! Compatible with Inkscape, Krita now provides the second independent implementation of SVG Mesh Gradients. Mesh gradients are used on vector objects and can deliver really natural looking results...

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Also: Krita 4.4.2 Released with New Tools, Brushes, and Halftone Filter

KDE Customization Guide: Here are 11 Ways You Can Change the Look and Feel of Your KDE-Powered Linux Desktop

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GNU
KDE
Linux

KDE Plasma desktop is unarguably the pinnacle of customization, as you can change almost anything you want. You can go to the extent of making it act as a tiling window manager.

KDE Plasma can confuse a beginner by the degree of customization it offers. As options tend to pile on top of options, the user starts getting lost.

To address that issue, I’ll show you the key points of KDE Plasma customization that you should be aware of.

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KDE: On KDE e.V., OSM, and SoK

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KDE

  • KDE e.V. board meeting January 2021 | [bobulate]

    A few times per year, the board of KDE e.V. gets together for a board meeting. While we also meet once a week for an hour to keep track of what is happening within the organization, the longer meetings are when big tasks are undertaken and the dusty corners are tidied up.

  • KDE OSM Indoor Map Demo App

    Last year KDE Itinerary got an indoor map view for airports and train stations, using a specialized map renderer and using raw OSM data as source. Improving that by contributing to upstream OSM data as well as our MapCSS styles now got a bit easier.

  • Season Of KDE - The Beginning

    Hello KDE Community I am Manav Sethi an engineering student from India and I got selected for Sok this year .

    I will be working on creating an app for the Promo Team which will be used to post to multiple social media platforms at once. Since the Promo team Members spend time posting the same thing on multiple platforms this will definitely help in increasing their efficiency.

  • The new beginnings- Season Of KDE

    Hello KDE community! I am Sai Moukthik Konduru, an undergrad from India. This pandemic gave me a chance to explore my interest in programming, and it has been a roller-coaster ride, to say the least. Recently I got to know about the concept of Open-source projects. The idea of collaborating and learning from the best and brightest minds across the globe has pumped me up so much that I started looking for organizations to work with. I found the KDE community thanks to a youtube video and got to know about the Season of KDE. I was not sure if I was good enough to be a part of Sok. But thanks to Devin Lin (who helped me make my first open-source contribution and is also my mentor for SoK), I am confident that I can complete this project as long as there is this huge community behind me.

This week in KDE: text reflow in Konsole!

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KDE

  • This week in KDE: text reflow in Konsole!

    This week a huge new feature landed in Konsole: it now reflows the text when you resize the window! This feature can be turned off if you don’t like it, but comes on by default. It works really well. Thanks very much to Carlos Alves and Tomaz Canabrava for this work! It will be released in Konsole 21.04.

  • KDE Will Reflow Text In Konsole On Window Resizing, Kirigami Icons Now Use Less RAM - Phoronix

    KDE developers have remained very busy in the new year working to improve their open-source desktop stack. 

    Following last week's near total rewrite of the KWin compositing code there has been an interesting batch of new improvements this week. Some of this week's highlights include: 

    - KDE's Konsole now re-flows text when resizing the window. The functionality is enabled by default (but there is an option to disable it). 

How to use KDE's productivity suite, Kontact

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KDE

In prior years, this annual series covered individual apps. This year, we are looking at all-in-one solutions in addition to strategies to help in 2021. Welcome to day 6 of 21 Days of Productivity in 2021.

In the long, long ago, when compiling a kernel was the only way to get wifi drivers, a graphical environment was mainly for running a web browser and opening lots of terminal windows. The look and feel was a mishmash of whatever toolkit the author of the program chose to use. And then, in 1996 Matthias Ettrich proposed and later released the first version of KDE. It was based on the then proprietary Qt toolkit (since made Free and Open Source). This release sparked what can only be called a desktop revolution on Linux, with the creation of the GNOME Desktop using the at-that-time FOSS GTK Toolkit. Between KDE and GNOME, Linux went from a only computer people use Linux operating system to a robust desktop environment for everyone.

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Discover Fedora Kinoite: a Silverblue variant with the KDE Plasma desktop

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KDE
Red Hat

Fedora Kinoite is an immutable desktop operating system featuring the KDE Plasma desktop. In short, Fedora Kinoite is like Fedora Silverblue but with KDE instead of GNOME. It is an emerging variant of Fedora, based on the same technologies as Fedora Silverblue (rpm-ostree, Flatpak, podman) and created exclusively from official RPM packages from Fedora.

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More in Tux Machines

Free, Libre, and Open Source Software Leftovers

  • Raptor Announces Kestrel Open-Source, Open HDL/Firmware Soft BMC

    Raptor Engineering known for their work on open-source POWER9 systems has announced Kestrel, an open-source baseboard management controller (BMC) design that is open down to the HDL design and firmware. Raptor describes Kestrel as "the world's first open HDL / open firmware soft BMC, built on POWER and capable of IPLing existing OpenPOWER systems!" This isn't a physical BMC chip but a "soft" BMC that is currently designed and tested on Lattice ECP-5 FPGAs. It can currently handle an initial program load (IPL) for a POWER9 host like the Blackbird and Talos II systems of Raptor Computing Systems after deactivating the existing ASpeed hardware BMC found on those systems.

  • Apache Superset Reaches Top-Level Status For Big Data Visualizations

    The Apache Software Foundation announced on Thursday that Apache Superset reached "top-level" status. Apache Superset is the project's big data visualization and business intelligence web solution. Apache Superset allows for big data exploration and visualization with data from a variety of databases ranging from SQLite and MySQL to Amazon Redshift, Google BigQuery, Snowflake, Oracle Database, IBM DB2, and a variety of other compatible data sources.

  • Intel oneAPI Level Zero 1.1 Headers/Loader Released

    The oneAPI Level Zero repository consisting of the Level Zero API headers, Level Zero loader, and validation layer have reached version 1.1. Following last year's big oneAPI 1.0 "Gold" status, Intel's open-source oneAPI effort continues moving along with the Level Zero focus as their low-level, direct-to-metal interface for offload accelerators like GPUs and other "XPU" devices.

  • [Older] A short journey to x86 long mode in coreboot on recent Intel platforms

    While it was difficult to add initial x86_64 support in coreboot, as described in my last blog article how-to-not-add-x86_64-support-to-coreboot it was way easier on real hardware. During the OSFC we did a small hackathon at 9elements and got x86_64 working in coreboot on recent Intel platforms. If you want to test new code that deals with low level stuff like enabling x86_64 mode in assembly, it's always good to test it on qemu using KVM. It runs the code in ring 0 instead of emulating every single instruction and thus is very close to bare metal machines.

Python Programming

  • How to Create a Database in MongoDB Using Python

    There’s no doubt that Python is a powerful—and popular—programming language capable of handling any project we throw its way. It is very flexible and can adjust to suit various development environments like penetration testing to web development and machine learning. When coupled to large applications such as those that require databases, Python adds more functionality and can be hard to work with, especially for beginners. Python knows this add provides us with better ways to add databases to our projects without compromising our workflow using a simple and intuitive NoSQL database. Using Python and a popular NoSQL database, MongoDB, development becomes more comfortable and, all in all, fun. This article will go over various MongoDB database concepts to give you a firm understanding of what it entails. After that, we will cover how to install MongoDB on Linux and show you how to use Python to interact with MongoDB.

  • Python Script to Monitor Network Connection

    The need to have our devices always connected to the internet is becoming more of a basic need than an added privilege. Having applications and devices that need to log, send, and receive data to the outside world is critical. Thus, having a tool that allows you to monitor when your network goes down can help you troubleshoot the network or stop the applications before sending a bunch of log errors. In today’s tutorial, we will build a simple network monitor that continually monitors your internet connectivity by sending ping requests to an external resource. The script we shall create shall also keep logs of when the internet is down and the duration of the downtime:

  • How to Build a Web Traffic Monitor with Python, Flask, SQLite, and Pusher

    If you have a web application running out there on the internet, you will need to know where your visitors are coming from, the systems they’re using, and other such things. Although you can use services such as Google Analytics, Monster Insights, etc., it’s more fun to build a monitoring system using Python, SQL database, and Pusher for real-time data updates. In today’s tutorial, we’ll go over how to create such a tool using Python, Flask, and Pusher. The tutorial is a highly-customized spin-off from a tutorial published on Pusher’s official page.

today's howtos

  • Linux 101: How to copy files and directories from the command line

    Are you new to Linux? If so, you've probably found the command line can be a bit intimidating. Don't worry--it is for everyone at the beginning. That's why I'm here to guide you through the process, and today I'm going to show you how to copy files and folders from the command line. Why would you need to copy files and folders this way? You might find yourself on a GUI-less Linux server and need to make a backup of a configuration file or copy a data directory. Trust me, at some point you're going to need to be able to do this. Let's find out how.

  • How to install Headless Dropbox on Ubuntu Server

    Dropbox can be termed as cloud-based file storage that makes your files available at any given time as long as you are connected to the internet. A local user accesses files by syncing to Dropbox. This aids to automatically update all removed and added files to your cloud-based storage. Most people are curious to know how the headless Dropbox can be installed on an Ubuntu Server. To learn more, follow the article below for detailed information, including screenshots of how the installation process is done.

  • Masterby Books by Michael W Lucas

    Look what was delievered a few days ago! Can’t wait to skill up in both SUDO and PAM modules. Michael W Lucas has written dozens of technical books on some of the most fascinating aspects of systems administration - I’ve read SSH Mastery book in the past and will someday try using FreeBSD for real just because Michael wrote so many books about this wonderful OS.

  • Cloud Native Patterns: a free ebook for developers

    Building cloud native applications is a challenging undertaking, especially considering the rapid evolution of cloud native computing. But it’s also very liberating and rewarding. You can develop new patterns and practices where the limitations of hardware dependent models, geography, and size no longer exist. This approach to technology can make cloud application developers more agile and efficient, even as it reduces deployment costs and increases independence from cloud service providers.

  • I am TheeMahn

    Let’s say you screw up your sources, Keysnatcher will fix them automatically. Nasup, dont have a NAS No Problemo I just told you use 0 memory. I can make it disable the service, I would not want it adding 6 seconds to your boot time. I have 20 Gigabit Networking and really understand. If you do have a NAS I want that picked up off the rip.

  • How to Install and Use the Etcher Tool on Ubuntu

    In most cases, when we’re trying out a new OS, we choose to install it on the main machine, a virtual machine, or to boot alongside another operating system. One of the upsides to using a Linux system is that we can boot using Live media, which makes it possible to test a specific distribution without altering the primary structure. Using bootable media such as USB drives, we can burn an iso image and boot from it or even use it to install the OS. Although there are various ways to create bootable media—UnetBootIn, dd (Unix), Rufus, Disk Utility, etcetera, —having a simple and cross-platform tool can be massively advantageous.

  • What is the difference between Paramiko and Netmiko?

    When it comes to networking, there is a wide range of perspectives, and one cannot master how to interact with all the devices in the real world. However, all networking devices share similar functionality that, when mastered, are automatable. As mentioned in my other tutorials, programmers are lazy and always looking to improve efficiency—thus doing the least work —, and when it comes to automating network-related issues, many often jump at the chance. In today’s quick guide, I’ll introduce you to automating SSH using two popular Python libraries: Paramiko and Netmiko. We will create simple python scripts using the two libraries to automate SSH and interact with network devices. I choose this approach because a guide primarily focused on the differences between Paramiko and Netmiko would be too short—a simple table would suffice—and no-concrete. By taking this approach, you’ll be better able to experiment with them and see which does what and how.

  • How to Use Unison to Synchronize Files Between Servers

    This tutorial will show you how to set up and use the Unison File synchronization tool on Debian systems. Using Unison, you can sync files between two different disks or directories in the same system or two other systems over the network.

  • How to detect the file system type of an unmounted device on Linux

    If you want to store data on a new hard drive or a USB memory stick, what you first need to do is to create a "filesystem" on it. This step is also known as "formating" the drive or the USB stick. A filesystem determines in exactly what format data is organized, stored and accessed on a physical device. It is often necessary to know the type of filesystem created on a hard disk or a USB thumb drive even before mounting it. For example, you may need to explicitly specify filesystem type when mounting a disk device, or have to use a filesystem-specific mount command (e.g., mount.aufs, mount.ntfs).

How to Install yay AUR Helper in Arch Linux [Beginner’s Guide]

This beginner’s guide explains the steps to install the Yay AUR helper in Arch Linux. Read more