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KDE

KDE Plasma 5.21 BETA Released. Download and Test Now.

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KDE
Linux
News

The KDE team announced the release of KDE Plasma 5.21 BETA and it is available for download and test. KDE Plasma 5.21 brings many new features such as a new kickoff menu, low-latency compositing, Wayland updates, new apps, and more. Here's what's new and how to download & test.
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KDE Plasma 5.21 Desktop Enters Beta, Here’s How to Test It Right Now

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KDE

Packed with numerous new features and improvements, the KDE Plasma 5.21 desktop environment promises a brand-new application launcher, a new dark theme for the Plasma desktop and a light theme for applications, a refreshed color scheme for all default KDE apps, as well as the highly-anticipated Plasma System Monitor app.

Of course, there will also be a lot of KWin and Wayland improvements that should reduce latency and smooth animations throughout the entire desktop environment, better compatibility with GTK applications, especially with apps written in GTK 4.

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Cutelyst 2.14.2 and ASql 0.27 released!

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KDE

Cutelyst a Qt Web Framework and ASql an asyncronous SQL library for Qt got new releases.

The Cutelyst version 2.14.0 was made in December but was a silent one, I had some issues in production but weren’t related to Cutelyst, the .1 release included some contributions by Adriaan de Groot, I also did some changes for Qt 5.15 and Qt6 but for Qt6 a new major version is needed.

Besides a bunch of fixes, a major regression on the plaintext benchmarks got fixed, unfourtunately not in time for round 20, but thanks to ASql you will Cutelyst got a better scoring on SQL related benchmarks.

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Krita 4.4.2 Released

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KDE

Today, the Krita team ihas released Krita 4.4.2. With over 300 changes, this is mainly a bugfix release, though some key new features, too!

Sharaf Zaman’s Google Summer of Code project has landed in this release! Compatible with Inkscape, Krita now provides the second independent implementation of SVG Mesh Gradients. Mesh gradients are used on vector objects and can deliver really natural looking results...

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Also: Krita 4.4.2 Released with New Tools, Brushes, and Halftone Filter

KDE Customization Guide: Here are 11 Ways You Can Change the Look and Feel of Your KDE-Powered Linux Desktop

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GNU
KDE
Linux

KDE Plasma desktop is unarguably the pinnacle of customization, as you can change almost anything you want. You can go to the extent of making it act as a tiling window manager.

KDE Plasma can confuse a beginner by the degree of customization it offers. As options tend to pile on top of options, the user starts getting lost.

To address that issue, I’ll show you the key points of KDE Plasma customization that you should be aware of.

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KDE: On KDE e.V., OSM, and SoK

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KDE

  • KDE e.V. board meeting January 2021 | [bobulate]

    A few times per year, the board of KDE e.V. gets together for a board meeting. While we also meet once a week for an hour to keep track of what is happening within the organization, the longer meetings are when big tasks are undertaken and the dusty corners are tidied up.

  • KDE OSM Indoor Map Demo App

    Last year KDE Itinerary got an indoor map view for airports and train stations, using a specialized map renderer and using raw OSM data as source. Improving that by contributing to upstream OSM data as well as our MapCSS styles now got a bit easier.

  • Season Of KDE - The Beginning

    Hello KDE Community I am Manav Sethi an engineering student from India and I got selected for Sok this year .

    I will be working on creating an app for the Promo Team which will be used to post to multiple social media platforms at once. Since the Promo team Members spend time posting the same thing on multiple platforms this will definitely help in increasing their efficiency.

  • The new beginnings- Season Of KDE

    Hello KDE community! I am Sai Moukthik Konduru, an undergrad from India. This pandemic gave me a chance to explore my interest in programming, and it has been a roller-coaster ride, to say the least. Recently I got to know about the concept of Open-source projects. The idea of collaborating and learning from the best and brightest minds across the globe has pumped me up so much that I started looking for organizations to work with. I found the KDE community thanks to a youtube video and got to know about the Season of KDE. I was not sure if I was good enough to be a part of Sok. But thanks to Devin Lin (who helped me make my first open-source contribution and is also my mentor for SoK), I am confident that I can complete this project as long as there is this huge community behind me.

This week in KDE: text reflow in Konsole!

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KDE

  • This week in KDE: text reflow in Konsole!

    This week a huge new feature landed in Konsole: it now reflows the text when you resize the window! This feature can be turned off if you don’t like it, but comes on by default. It works really well. Thanks very much to Carlos Alves and Tomaz Canabrava for this work! It will be released in Konsole 21.04.

  • KDE Will Reflow Text In Konsole On Window Resizing, Kirigami Icons Now Use Less RAM - Phoronix

    KDE developers have remained very busy in the new year working to improve their open-source desktop stack. 

    Following last week's near total rewrite of the KWin compositing code there has been an interesting batch of new improvements this week. Some of this week's highlights include: 

    - KDE's Konsole now re-flows text when resizing the window. The functionality is enabled by default (but there is an option to disable it). 

How to use KDE's productivity suite, Kontact

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KDE

In prior years, this annual series covered individual apps. This year, we are looking at all-in-one solutions in addition to strategies to help in 2021. Welcome to day 6 of 21 Days of Productivity in 2021.

In the long, long ago, when compiling a kernel was the only way to get wifi drivers, a graphical environment was mainly for running a web browser and opening lots of terminal windows. The look and feel was a mishmash of whatever toolkit the author of the program chose to use. And then, in 1996 Matthias Ettrich proposed and later released the first version of KDE. It was based on the then proprietary Qt toolkit (since made Free and Open Source). This release sparked what can only be called a desktop revolution on Linux, with the creation of the GNOME Desktop using the at-that-time FOSS GTK Toolkit. Between KDE and GNOME, Linux went from a only computer people use Linux operating system to a robust desktop environment for everyone.

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Discover Fedora Kinoite: a Silverblue variant with the KDE Plasma desktop

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KDE
Red Hat

Fedora Kinoite is an immutable desktop operating system featuring the KDE Plasma desktop. In short, Fedora Kinoite is like Fedora Silverblue but with KDE instead of GNOME. It is an emerging variant of Fedora, based on the same technologies as Fedora Silverblue (rpm-ostree, Flatpak, podman) and created exclusively from official RPM packages from Fedora.

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Season of KDE 2021

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KDE
  • SoK 2021: Post 1 – Claudio Cambra

    I’ve written about FLOSS stuff for a while now, but recently I’ve been working on my coding skills too. I decided to help with documentation efforts as this would help newcomers and also allow me to learn more about how KDE’s best apps are made. I’ll be working under Carl Schwan, who will make sure that the upcoming content in the docs is the best it can be. Documentation is important for any project, and we have identified a few areas which I will be working on improving over the next few months. These include introductory tutorials, Kirigami’s docs, and more. My hope is that these efforts will ensure that the community of KDE developers keeps growing!

  • Season of KDE 2021 - Anjani's home

    Hello people! I’m Anjani, an IT student from India. I’ve been contributing to KDE since last year. Thanks to the KDE community to have an engaging program like SoK. I got to know about this last year but couldn’t participate. Now I’m here.

    I’ll be working under the mentorship of Han Young on implementing a D-Bus daemon that will fetch/provide weather data using KWeatherCore to KWeather as well as other applications on Plasma mobile who would like to have weather data for some purpose.

  • Season of KDE Selection [Ed: Link no longer live]

    Hey people from around the world !! I am Anubhav Choudhary, an engineering student from India. I recently got selected in Season of KDE 2021 to work under Calamares project. My work is to resolve numerous issues and complete some tasks mentioned on Calamares’ Issue page. And I am just too excited about that. Why? Because I have been contributing to open source (to KDE? yes) for sometime now. But It always felt very unordered and random contributions (which I was not happy about).

  • Season of KDE 2021 - The start

    Hello KDE people, I am Suraj an undergraduate student majoring in Information Technology from India. I have been contributing to KDE Websites for quite a while. KDE Web has been undergoing major changes in the past few years. We have seen many sites being ported to JAM Stack i.e particularly static site generators such as Hugo and Jekyll.

    Using static site generators sometimes are a great choice because it reduces server dependencies since the website rebuilds only when the site is updated. Also, updating is a lot easier when the content is written in markdown and simple data formats.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: OpenGL, Intel and Zink

  • More OpenGL Threading Improvements Land For Mesa 21.1 - Phoronix

    Even in 2021 longtime open-source AMD Mesa driver developer Marek Olšák isn't done optimizing OpenGL for delivering the best possible performance with the Radeon graphics driver. Marek's latest work includes more OpenGL threading enhancements and other work seemingly targeted at SPECViewPerf workloads. Marek has spent the past several weeks working to remove the last OpenGL threading synchronization stalls that happen with SPECViewPerf 13. As part of this latest pull request he added support to glthread for executing display lists asynchronously. Plus there are some other OpenGL code improvements too.

  • More Intel Graphics Work In Linux 5.12: Gen7 Improvements, Faster Suspend/Resume

    New feature material for Linux 5.12 continues getting ready ahead of the merge window opening in February to formally kick off the cycle. On top of the prior Intel graphics driver improvements queued up in recent weeks to DRM-Next, another batch of Intel updates were sent out this week.

  • Zink OpenGL On Vulkan Now Supports OpenGL 4.2 With Mesa 21.1

    Going back to last summer there have been patches experimentally taking Zink as far as OpenGL 4.6 albeit it's been a lengthy process getting all of the relevant patches upstreamed. Additionally, some patches have required reworking or proper adjustments after going through the conformance test suite to ensure they are up to scratch for merging. Thanks to that ongoing effort by Mike Blumenkrantz working under contract for Valve and the work by Collabora developers, it was a quick jump this month from seeing OpenGL 4.1 to OpenGL 4.2 in mainline.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Itshappening.gif

    I meant to blog a couple times this week, but I kept getting sidetracked by various matters. Here’s a very brief recap on what’s happened in zinkland over the past week.

  • Zink OpenGL-On-Vulkan vs. RadeonSI OpenGL Performance As Of January 2021 - Phoronix

    With the Zink OpenGL-on-Vulkan implementation within Mesa on a nice upward trajectory with most recently now having the backing of a Valve contract developer and a focus on getting the backlog of patches to this Gallium3D code upstreamed, here are some fresh benchmarks looking at where the performance currently stands when using Zink atop the RADV Vulkan driver compared to using the native RadeonSI driver with this round of testing from a Radeon RX 5700 XT graphics card.

Android Leftovers

Zink OpenGL-On-Vulkan vs. RadeonSI OpenGL Performance As Of January 2021

With the Zink OpenGL-on-Vulkan implementation within Mesa on a nice upward trajectory with most recently now having the backing of a Valve contract developer and a focus on getting the backlog of patches to this Gallium3D code upstreamed, here are some fresh benchmarks looking at where the performance currently stands when using Zink atop the RADV Vulkan driver compared to using the native RadeonSI driver with this round of testing from a Radeon RX 5700 XT graphics card. Read more

Mozilla Leftovers

  • Karl Dubost: Site interventions and automated testing

    We follow a strict release process tied to the release cycle of Firefox. You can discover our CSS interventions and JavaScript Interventions. The calendar for the upcoming releases is defined in advance. Before each release cycle for site interventions, the Softvision Webcompat team (Oana and Cipri) makes sure to test the site without the patch to discover if the site intervention is still necessary. This takes time and requires a lot of manual work. Time that could be used for more introspective work. To activate deactivate site interventions, you can play with extensions.webcompat.perform_injections in about:config.

  • Firefox UX: Who Gets to Define Success? Listening to Stories of How People Value Firefox to Redefine Metrics

    Firefox Monthly Active Users (MAU): Measures the number of Firefox Desktop clients active in the past 28 days. (Source: Firefox Public Data Report) With over 200 million people using our web browser every month, Firefox has arguably achieved classic definitions of scale. However, as researchers, we also know that the reasons behind product choice and usage are often more complex than numbers alone can illustrate. In early 2019, our Data Science team began to review our current in-product metrics in an effort to better understand how to interpret our usage numbers and expose any gaps. Firefox User Researcher Jennifer Davidson (and co-author) consulted on that project, which ultimately found that we had very limited qualitative understanding of Firefox usage numbers. Around the same time, a cross-functional team, including Firefox User Researcher Gemma Petrie (and co-author), began an internal research project to gain a top-down view of value by asking our senior leaders how they would define the value of our products. Perhaps unsurprisingly in such a large organization, there were a wide variety of responses. In late 2019, Gemma and Jennifer proposed a study to align these efforts and explore the gaps we were observing. We knew it was time to get an “outside in” perspective to inform our internal narrative, and ultimately help our organization make better product decisions. At the heart of this research was a fundamental question: How do people describe the value they get out of Firefox? We hypothesized that by better understanding how people describe the value they get out of Firefox, we would be able to better inform how to measure our success as a company and encourage our leaders to complement traditional measures of scale with more human-centered metrics. Some of you may be thinking, “That is a very fundamental question for such an established product! Why don’t you already know the answer to it?” There are two primary reasons why this is a difficult question for our Firefox researchers to study. First, commonplace products like a web browser present unique challenges. The role of a web browser is almost akin to a utility–it is so deeply domesticated into people’s lives, that they may use Firefox every day without thinking much about it (Haddon 2006). A second unique challenge for Mozilla is that the usage data to understand how people use Firefox is often nonexistent. Mozilla practices very limited data collection. Our data practices are aligned with our mission and we do not collect information about the content people visit on the web (Mozilla 2020b, Mozilla 2020c, Mozilla 2020d). Often, user research is the only opportunity our organization has to understand the content people seek out and their workflows within the browser.

  • Mike Taylor: The Mike Taylor method™ of naming git branches

    I started doing this about 10 years ago when I worked at Opera. I don’t know if it was a widely used convention, or I just copied it off someone, but it’s pretty good, IMHO.

  • Tor Browser: Anonymity and Beyond

    There are three types of web: the surface web, the deep web, and the dark web. All that you can access using your Google browser is known as the surface web - it is visible to one and all. The deep web is all information that is under lock and key. In other words, we don’t have access to it. The dark web, on the other hand, is a creepy and secret underworld where access is denied using normal browsers. But with special tools handy and ready, users can buy almost anything - from guns to atom bombs - with total anonymity. In order to access the dark web, we need a special browser capable of opening and displaying dot onion links. This is where the Tor browser comes in. Typically, when we surf the web, we leave digital footprints everywhere in the form of our IP address. We allow ourselves to be tracked and monitored by everyone out there. This is because our typical browsers allow it. Tor, on the other hand, does not allow tracking. It is a specialized browser whose first priority is anonymity.