Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

KTextEditor - Small Things Matter

Filed under
KDE
Software

Thanks to the feedback & patches provided by others, I found a bit more motivation to take a look at the small things that seems to be odd in KTextEditor.

Interesting enough, if you once notice a small detail (like a dead pixel on your display you suddenly find after years of use), it really sticks out like a sore thumb…

Here two small things that caught my interest this week.

Read more

First beta out for Krita 4.4

Filed under
KDE

The summer has come and gone since the 4.3 release, but we have not been sitting still. We had four Summer of Code Students this year, each of which completed their project. One of these projects has already made it into 4.4: The SeExpr fill layers! And that’s not the only new fill layer type… And fill layers now have on-canvas preview when you created them. And there’s a new plugin that helps when using Krita together with Godot. And there are new options for the brush engines and, of course, a ton of bugfixes! The full release notes bring you all the details!

So, today, we’re releasing Krita 4.4.0 beta 1: in two weeks we will release the final version. Please help improve Krita by testing this beta!

Read more

Plasma Beta Review Day

Filed under
KDE

Plasma 5.20 is now in beta, which gives us one month of intense testing, bugfixing and polishing.

During this time we need as many hands on deck as possible to help with finding regressions, triaging incoming reports and generally being on top of as much as possible.

In order to make this process more accessible, more systematic and hopefully more fun we are going to run an official "Plasma Beta Review Day"

Read more

Running PlasmaShell with Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
KDE

QtQuick, in slightly more words, is a scene graph implementation. At a developer level we create abstract "Items" which might be some text or a rectangle etc or a picture. This in turn gets transformed into a tree of nodes with geometry, "materials" and transforms. In turn this gets translated into a big long stream of OpenGL instructions which we send to the graphic card.

Qt6 will see this officially change to sit on top of the "Render Hardware Interface" stack, that instead of always producing OpenGL, will support Vulkan, Metal and Direct3D natively. The super clever part about it is that custom shaders (low level fast drawing) are also abstracted; meaning we will write some GLSL and generate the relevant shader for each API without having to duplicate the work.

Read more

Also: Experiments Are Underway With Vulkan Powering The KDE Plasma Shell

Latest Progress on KDE Themes and KTechLab

Filed under
KDE

  • Week report 0

    Hello every one in the KDE planet and beyond, this is the progress weekly report on O².

    So The week surprisingly started Monday and after the initial chock and accompanying usual work day at KDAB, I decided to do a little bit of progress on O² style mock ups...

  • Announcing KTechLab 0.50.0

    I’m happy to announce KTechLab release version 0.50.0. KTechLab is an IDE for microcontrollers and electronics. In this new release every user-visible functionality is the same as in previous releases, however, the codebase of KTechLab has been updated, so now it is a KF5/Qt5 application and it does not depend anymore on KDELibs4Support libraries.

    This release should compile and run on systems where KDELibs4Support libraries are not available.

    In its current state KTechLab’s codebase is ready for fixes and enhancements, as it only depends on modern libraries like KDE Frameworks 5 (KF5) and Qt5. As a side note, KF6 and Qt6 have been announced, and the first release of Qt6 has been scheduled to the end of 2020.

  • KTechLab git master doesn't depend on deprecated Qt5/KF5 API anymore

    KTechLab git master doesn’t depend anymore on deprecated Qt5/KF5 APIs. Thank you for everybody who made this possible!

    Using only up-to-date APIs should help with long-term maintenance of KTechLab and probably it helps distributors of KTechLab, too.

Okular 20.08 — redesigned annotation tools

Filed under
KDE

Last year I wrote about some enhancements made to Okular’s annotation tool and in one of those, Simone Gaiarin commented that he was working on redesigning the Annotation toolbar altogether. I was quite interested and was also thinking of ‘modernizing’ the tool — only, I had no idea how much work it would be.

The existing annotation tool works, but it had some quirks and had many advanced options which were documented pretty well in the Handbook but not obvious to an unscrupulous user. For instance, if the user would like to highlight some part of the text, she selects (single-clicks) the highlighter tool, applies it to a block of text. When another part of text is to be highlighted, you’d expect the highlighter tool to apply directly; but it didn’t ‘stick’ — tool was unselected after highlighting the first block of text. There is an easy way to make the annotation tool ‘stick’ — instead of single-click to select the tool, simply double-click, and it persists. Another instance is the ‘Strikeout’ annotation which is not displayed by default, but can be added to the tools list.

Simone, with lots of inputs, testing and reviews from David Hurka, Nate Graham and Albert Astals Cid et al., has pulled off a magnificent rewrite of Okular’s annotation toolbar. To get an idea of the amount of work went into this, see this phabricator task and this invent code review. The result of many months of hardwork is a truly modern, easy to explore-and-use annotation support. I am not aware of any other libre PDF reader with such good annotation features.

Read more

This week in KDE: everything happened

Filed under
KDE

This was a pretty huge week for KDE. Apparently people had a lot of pent-up work, because right after Akademy finished last week, the floodgates started opening! Amazing stuff has been landing left and right every day this week! Some highlights are touch support in Dolphin, user-configurable per-view sort ordering in Elisa, optional Systemd startup, tons of Okular scrolling improvements, and much, much, much more.

Read more

KDE Plasma 5.20 Beta is out. Final Release Next Month.

Filed under
KDE

The next installment of the Plasma desktop environment, KDE Plasma 5.20 Beta released. The final release is expected on October 13, 2020.
Read more

KDE Plasma 5.20 Desktop Enters Beta, Final Release Expected on October 13

Filed under
KDE

KDE Plasma 5.20 is packed with countless of enhancements. There are improvements everywhere, starting with a new look and feel consisting of an icon-only Task Manager that comes with lots of changes, a slightly thicker default panel, redesigned OSDs for brightness and volume, improvements to the Digital Clock applet, and a new default shortcut for moving and resizing windows (Meta+drag).

After several months of development, during which the KDE development team managed to add numerous new features and improvements, the forthcoming KDE Plasma 5.20 desktop environment is now available for public beta testing if you’re a bleeding-edge user wanting to get an early taste of the changes.

Read more

Plasma 5.20 Beta

Filed under
KDE

Plasma 5.20 is going to be one absolutely massive release! More features, more fixes for longstanding bugs, more improvements to the user interface! Read on for details...

Read on to discover all the new features and improvements of Plasma 5.20…

Read more

Also: KDE Plasma 5.20 Beta Released With Better Wayland Support

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Allan Day: GNOME Shell user research goings on

It’s been a while since we last blogged about the GNOME Shell design work that’s been happening. While we might not have blogged in a bit, there’s been a lot going on behind the scenes, particularly on the research side, and it’s about time that we told everyone about what we’ve been up to. As a side note: a great team has developed around this initiative. The existing design team of Jakub, Tobias and myself has been joined by Maria Komarova from System76. Maria has a particularly strong research background and was immensely helpful in running interviews. The development side has also been fully engaged with the process, particularly through Georges and Florian. Read more

Android Leftovers

Apostrophe – distraction free Markdown editor

Markdown is a plain text formatting syntax created by John Gruber in 2004. It’s designed to be easy-to-read and easy-to-write. Readability is at the very heart of Markdown. It offers the advantages of plain text, provides a convenient format for writing for the web, but it’s not intended to be a replacement for HTML. Markdown is a writing format, not a publishing format. You control the display of the document; formatting words as bold or italic, adding images, and creating lists are just a few of the things we can do with Markdown. Mostly, Markdown is just regular text with a few non-alphabetic characters included, such as # or *. Apostrophe is a distraction free Markdown editor. It uses pandoc as backend for Markdown parsing and offers a very clean and sleek user interface. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: DevNation Tech Talks, LINUX Unplugged and mintCast

  • Kubernetes: The evolution of distributed systems

    DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about Kubernetes and distributed systems from Bilgin Ibryam and Burr Sutter. Cloud-native applications of the future will consist of hybrid workloads: stateful applications, batch jobs, stateless microservices, and functions (plus maybe something else) wrapped as Linux containers and deployed via Kubernetes on any cloud. Functions and the so-called serverless computing model are the latest evolution of what started as service-oriented architecture years ago. But is this the last step of the application architecture evolution and is it here to stay? During this talk, we will take you on a journey exploring distributed application needs, and how they evolved with Kubernetes, Istio, Knative, Dapr, and other projects. By the end of the session, you will know what is coming after microservices.

  • Distro Triforce | LINUX Unplugged 372

    What would it really take to get you to switch Linux distributions? We debate the practical reasons more and more people are sticking with the big three. Plus Carl from System76 stops by to surprise us with some firmware news.

  • mintCast 344 – Getting Jacked

    First up, in our Wanderings, I fiddle with the Focusrite, Tony Hughes paints it pink, Joe puts a ring on it, Bo gets jacked, Tony Watts reduces, reuses and recycles