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KDE

KSnip and Spectacle

Filed under
KDE
Software

Switching back-and-forth between the tabs gives me a “pixels moved” sense, and that’s really useful. KSnip’s wide selection of annotation tools – it’s nearly a specialized drawing application – helps, too: I tell people to draw big red arrows on screenshots pointing to problems (because describing things is difficult, and a glaring visual glitch to you may be totally invisible to me).

With KSnip, adding detail to a screenshot is child’s play.

That’s not to say that KSnip doesn’t have its issues. But a blog post is not a place to complaing about someone else’s Free Software: the issue tracker is (with constructive bug reports, not complaints).

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Also: Third alpha release of my project

Bringing modern process management to the desktop

Filed under
KDE
Software

A desktop environment's sole role is to connect users to their applications. This includes everything from launching apps to actually displaying apps but also managing them and making sure they run fairly. Everyone is familiar the concept of a "Task manager" (like ksysguard), but over time they haven't kept up with the way applications are being developed or the latest developments from Linux.

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KDE and GNOME: Plasma 5.19 in Groovy Gorilla, GSoC and Fractal

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Plasma 5.19 testing in Groovy Gorilla

    Are you running the development release of Kubuntu Groovy Gorilla 20.10, or wanting to try the daily live ISO?

    Plasma 5.19 has now landed in 20.10 and is available for testing. You can read about the new features and improvements in Plasma 5.19 in the official KDE release announcement.

  • GSoC Review 1 - Qt3D based backend for KStars

    In the fourth week of GSoC, I worked on adding support for Skybox which supports the projection modes implemented last week. I also added the grid implementation in KStars based on the prototype.

  • GSoC ’ 20 Progress: Week 3 and 4

    The past two weeks did not see as much progress as I would have liked because of my university exams and evaluations. Now, let’s focus on the work that I could do before I got swamped with the academic work and term exams.

    I started the third week by working on drafting a basic QML display of the subtitle model items, like the position of the subtitles in the timeline. I drafted a basic delegate QML model to display the start positions of each subtitle line. Then I began working on integrating the back-end part (which I had mentioned in the previous post) with the basic front-end part (displaying the position of the subtitles).

    In this process of integrating the subtitle model with the QML delegate model, I encountered a few logical errors with my code and some connections with the Subtitle Model which I had completely overlooked. It was also during this time that I realised I had missed out some key functions while writing the subtitle model class.

  • Google Summer of Code 2020 – week 4 and 5

    Hi, today I will talk about my week 4 and week 5 and bring some news!

    The last post was short but this one will make up for it, explaining some important bits, and changes, in the structure of mark that changed/improved during the first month of coding in GSoC.

    In week 4, I documented a huge part of the existing code, although there is still a need for some updates. Currently in week 5, I am fixing some bugs of the new logic and I will document the newly created Painter class (more information below), also start developing the logic for text annotation.

  • Fractal: Refactoring and the review process

    In this year GSoC, Alejandro is working on Fractal, moving code from the backend to the client, to try to simplify the code used to communicate with the matrix.org server and maybe in the future we can replace fractal-matrix-api with the matrix-rust-sdk. And then we'll have less code in our project to maintain.

    This is a great work, something needed in a project with a technological debt of several years. I created this project to learn Rust, and also I was learning about the matrix protocol during the project build. And other contributors do the same. So we've been building one thing on top another for a lot of years.

    In this kind of community driven projects it's the way to go. For some time we've people interested and developers think about the design and start change some parts or to write new functionality following a new design pattern. But voluntary developers motivation change in time and they left the project and the next one continues the work with a different vision.

KDE's Move to Gitlab and More

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • Why the KDE community is #MovingToGitlab

    The KDE community is #MovingToGitlab! After announcing the original decision to migrate to GitLab in November 2019, KDE has officially completed phase one of their migration, and contributors have begun to use GitLab on a daily basis at invent.kde.org. Read on to learn more about KDE's migration story.

  • KDE's GitLab is now Live

    After our final decision to adopt GitLab in November 2019, KDE started the work of tackling the many challenges that come with moving a whole development platform for a large open source community. KDE has now officially completed Phase One of the adoption and contributors have begun to use GitLab on a daily basis.

    [...]

    GitLab will also help us to achieve goals like "Consistency", as it will help our community members have a single solution to their needs. Now, we will be able to host and review code, manage projects/issues, communicate, collaborate, and develop software/applications on a single platform.

    By adopting GitLab as a platform, we will be adding stability to our framework, as we will count on the support of GitLab as a company. GitLab, Inc. has nearly a decade of experience behind it, releases new versions on a regular basis and, apart from its in-house team, counts on an active community of third party contributors. This guarantees that our new development platform will be updated and maintained throughout the years.

  • KDE Completes Transition To GitLab For Developer Portal

    KDE has completed its transition to its own self-hosted GitLab instance for Git hosting and other developer services for handling of bug reports and merge requests.

    KDE has followed the likes of GNOME, FreeDesktop.org / X.Org, and other projects on centering around GitLab for their Git serving and related hosting rather than relying upon the likes of GitHub.

  • Google Summer of Code 2020 - Week 3

    This week, I spent most of my time testing the Rocs graph-layout-plugin. I needed to test the method that applies the force-based layout algorithm to a graph, whose signature is the following.

    [...]

    Before going to the non-functional part, I decided to deal with the easy and familiar functional tests. I was not precise in my description of the method deliberately. Actually, there is at least one guarantee that it should provide: if we draw each node as a circle of radius nodeRadius with centers at the positions calculated by the method, these circles should respect a left-margin and a top-margin of length margin. This was a nice opportunity for me to try the QtTest framework. I wrote a data-driven Unit Test and everything went well.

    Back to the non-functional part, I decided to write a quality benchmark. The idea is to measure some aesthetic criteria of the layouts generated for various classes of graphs. The metrics already implemented are: number of edge crosses, number of edges that cross some other edges, number of node intersections and number of nodes that intersect some other node. Although there is no formal definition of a nice layout, keeping the values of these metrics low seems to be desirable. Currently, I already implemented generators for paths, circles, trees and complete graphs. For each one of these classes of graph, I generate a number of graphs, apply the layout algorithm a certain number of times to each of them, and calculate summary statistics for each one of the considered aesthetic metrics.

KDE: Web Site, SPDX and Krita

Filed under
KDE
  • GSoC'20 with KDE

    With the first month of the coding period almost over, I have been working on completing the first part of my GSoC project.

    I have been porting kde.org to hugo. The website is very old and has lots and lots of pages. It is even older than me! I have been working on porting these pages to markdown removing the old PHP syntax and adding improvements to the design, responsiveness and accessibility of the website.

    I have completed porting the announcements upto the year 2013. I ported the year 2014 as well but I replaced the formatted links into normal ones but I didn’t realise It would break the translations for the pages. So I may have to port these announcements again Sad . KDE provides a pot file to its translators and they provide translations in a po file in return. We use a custom extraction script to extract the strings to be translated from the markdown files. The translator is smart enough to ignore some changes to the strings but the changes to the links that I made would break it. It also doesn’t work well with HTML that isn’t inline. I will keep these things in mind in the future.

    I am also working on automating (RegEx is Awesome!) much of the work involved in porting these files which may make up for the time lost.

  • SPDX and the KDE FLA

    KDE repositories are switching over to SPDX identifiers following the REUSE.software specifications. This machine-readable form of licensing information pushes for more consistency in licensing and licensing information.

    Long, long ago I wrote some kind of license-checker for KDE sources, as part of the English Breakfast Network. The world has moved on since then, and supply-chains increasingly want to know licensing details: specifically, what exact license is in use (avoiding variations in wording that have cropped up) and what license-performative actions are needed exactly (like in the BSD license family, “reproduce the Copyright notice above”).

    Andreas Cord-Landwehr has been chasing license information in KDE source code recently, and has re-done tooling and overall made things better. So there’s now changes – via merge requests on our GitLab instance KDE invent – showing up.

    There is one minor thing of note which I’ve discussed with him, and which bears upon the Fiduciary License Agreement (FLA) that KDE e.V. has.

  • Phase 1 Evaluation Status Report

    It has been over a month since the start of GSoC. Phase #1 evaluations will start today. This post is to summarise all the work done by me during phase #1

Adriaan de Groot: KSysGuard

Filed under
KDE

Packaging a big stack like the software from the KDE community – Frameworks, Plasma, and all the applications and libraries and tools from the KDE Release Service – takes a fair bit of time and energy. The KDE-FreeBSD team works on both packaging and porting – making sure that KDE applications behave well on FreeBSD just like on other operating systems.

The majority of the work of compatibility happens in Qt, which is also maintained by the KDE-FreeBSD team. Then the KDE frameworks – 80 or so libraries that are small, lightweight, tiered-so-you-know-about-dependencies and LGPL-licensed – pile a bunch of compatibility on top of that for desktop purposes.

But sometimes, an application needs to dig into the system itself. A text editor edits text regardless of the underlying system, but a memory-usage monitor needs to know how to ask the OS about memory-usage.

So this week I spent a fair bit of time in the KSysGuard codebase, because there’s a FreeBSD bug report that says that the memory-usage monitor shows nothing, and another report that says the graph and the status bar don’t match.

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GSoC Reports From KDE and Python

Filed under
Development
KDE
Software
  • GSoC 2020 and KDE

    Tomorrow (29/06/2020) begins the first evaluation of the Google Summer of Code 2020. Last GSoC, when I was participating as a student, I wrote in my final report a set of future proposals that could be done in the ROCS graph IDE (Section What’s Next?). This year, some students got interested in these ideas but only one could enter the program (we didn’t have enough mentors for more than one project).

  • Cantor Integrated Documentation : Week 3 and 4 Progress

    Hello KDE people. First phase evaluations is due from today onward until 3rd of July. It has been coupe of weeks since I had posted about my project. I was quite busy writing code implementing the documentation panel for the various backends supported by Cantor. In the last post I have explained about how I generated the help files namely qhc (Qt Help Collection) and qch (Qt Compressed Help) from the documentation's source file. In today's post I will explain how I utilized Maxima's help files to actually display help inside the Cantor application itself. So here are the things done:-

  • KDE Connect SMS App (First Evaluation)

    Hi Everyone! It’s been a while since my last post and during this period I continued adding MMS support in KDE Connect SMS app. After the addition of MMS support in android app, My next step was to enable the desktop SMS client to allow users to reply to multi-target messages. I had some discussion with my mentors related to the structure of the network packets to allow sending multimedia files from android to desktop. Since the Attachment field should be an optional field and replacing the current packet type entirely was not feasible keeping in mind the backward compatibility for the desktop app. Simon suggested a nice idea of converting the thumbnails into Base64 encoded string and then adding it into the network packet. This solved the issue of replacing the entire method of pushing the messages to the desktop.

    After successfully completing and testing the code on android studio, I added the support to receive and display the optional attachment object on the desktop side. The desktop side was mostly straight forward except transferring the QImage from C++ to QML but at the end I figured it out.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In: Week 5
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #5
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: [Week 4] Check-in
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #5
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-In #3 (22nd Jun - 29th Jun)
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 3 Check-in

    Since we can parse a shell script into statements now. We need to fiter the install command and extact what will be installed in the command.

Nitrux 1.3.0 is available to download

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

We are pleased to announce the launch of Nitrux 1.3.0. This new version brings together the latest software updates, bug fixes, performance improvements, and ready-to-use hardware support.

Nitrux 1.3.0 is available for immediate download.

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7 Alternatives to Kubuntu

Filed under
KDE

Kubuntu is of course a valid distribution in its own right and the case for it has been stronger again ever since Linux Mint cancelled their own KDE edition in 2018. On top of that Kubuntu serves as a base for KDE Neon. Nevertheless, one or the other user might want to look at other alternatives and options to run a pre-configured and set up Plasma Desktop. A ready-made one because the desktop environment can be installed on top of any distribution base.

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Kubuntu 20.04 LTS - Bland but functional

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Kubuntu has been reviewed here before, albeit in a comparison with the Fedora KDE spin in the KDE 4 days. Quite a while I know, and since I happen to like Plasma it's been on the cards to check out a few KDE-centric distributions once again. Kubuntu is one of the oldest official Ubuntu flavours from Canonical and should have become the default desktop offering long ago.

When talking about consistency and predictability for business and enterprise desktops, which is what's needed there, Ubuntu does not exactly look good. What could be less consistent than moving from Gnome 2 to Unity and then again to Gnome Shell in a matter of a few years? For the home user it does not matter much, most of us are jumping from distro to distro and between different environments as we see fit, but in business there's training involved, in particular with non-technical staff who may already have a hard time switching from other operating systems.

With that out of the way, let's begin. Kubuntu 20.04 is distributed as a 64 bit download for the amd/intel architecture only. I opted to get it via torrent as it does the checksum checking for us so we can be sure not to get a corrupted download. Then created the bootable USB stick. Kubuntu is distributed as a hybrid live installable image so we can check it out and test the hardware before committing.

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