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Qt Creator 4.12 released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.12!

Qt Creator 4.12 allows you to browse and search for items in the Qt Marketplace. Check the new page "Marketplace" in the Welcome screen. So far it provides a browser similar to the examples and tutorials page, with a search input field and support for tags. Choosing an item from the list opens the corresponding marketplace page in your system browser.

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Article: Rounded Plasma and Qt CSDs?

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KDE

I might start writing some articles with technical information in order to spread information that I consider them obvious but in KDE community might not be.

Many of you might find them boring but in the end I consider them just easy to read technical information.

Based on Maui Weekly Report #3 I show there is interest for Qt/QML applications that can draw window buttons in window internal space. I even like them in some apps such as music and video players.

For those that want a flame war between SSDs and CSDs I actually dont even care. You can argue as much as you want, this article is not about choosing a winner, it is about technology and solutions that already exist.

Plasma/Qt/KDE technologies have already solved this, so Maui can just use the following proposed solution and in the end provide the most magical client side window buttons that will also be consistent between different apps and they could be even better than other provided solutions.

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KDE/Qt: Qt 3D, Qactus 2 and KDE Plasma 5.19 Pre-Beta Run Through

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • Why is my screen black?

    When building Qt 3D scenes that are designed to run on multiple platforms, materials need to provide multiple shaders targeting each specific version of OpenGL. Each version information is stored on QTechnique nodes attached to a QEffect node. Similarly, you can implement different algorithms (forward vs deferred rendering for example), so they get assigned filter keys which are key/value pairs. Finally, some algorithms require multiple passes, but may use different shaders in different passes. This pass information is stored in QRenderPass nodes (attached to the technique), also using filter keys.

    When Qt 3D comes to do the render it needs to select the technique based on the available hardware. It will also need to select the technique appropriate to the rendering algorithm that is used. And when it processes each render pass, it will also need to select the appropriate shader based on the render pass. This can be controlled by building a frame graph which QTechniqueFilter nodes and QRenderPassFilter nodes.

  • Qactus v2.0.0 is out!

    Qactus v2.0.0 has been released

  • KDE Plasma 5.19 Pre-Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at KDE Plasma 5.19 Pre-Beta.

KDE Forks (KWinFT, Qt, CHMLib) and KPublicTransport

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KDE
  • KWinFT packaged for openSUSE, KWin-LowLatency updated

    First review: I don’t notice a difference to regular KWin – I guess that’s a good thing for a new project.

    I won’t submit the package to the KDE repository after they refused to accept KWin-LowLatency because they don’t want 3rd party packages there. They will just do the same again. If they ever change their minds, I’ll be happy to submit both again.

  • Commentary on the Qt situation

    A lot of things have been going on with Qt these days. It all started with The Qt Company trying to get an increase in their revenues, specifically this blog post. And just like a proper PR team, they didn't talk about the changes clearly for the open-source folks who use the product.

    [...]

    These changes won't affect open source Qt that much, on the other hand, the last 2 points do make sense. The Qt company is paying for the server to host the builds, it would be wrong for us to expect them to do that for no charge. Other than that, the first point would mean the open-source community needs to do some extra work to backport security patches. A thing which distro packagers already used to do in the past when there were no LTS releases of Qt.

    [...]

    If KDE forks Qt, it would be a huge task on the community to maintain it on their own, especially parts like QtWebEngine. Though we could always backport all the patches to the fork after a year along with ours. If companies which rely on the LGPL Qt, come together, an open-source Qt fork could surely be maintained under KDE. It might be a bit of trouble to organize everything but it is not impossible at all.

    [...]

    This event at least made me realize a couple of things, one The Qt Company never acknowledges the open source contributions. I never saw a single mention of KDE in their blog post leave all other projects. Second don't rely on one thing too much. It is great that Qt makes C++ as easy as Java, but relying too much on it could have worse consequences.

  • Should KDE fork CHMLib?

    CHMLib is a library to handle CHM files.

    It is used by Okular and other applications to show those files.

    It hasn't had a release in 11 years.

    It is packaged by all major distributions.

    A few weeks ago I got annoyed because we need to carry a patch in Okular flathub because the code is not great and it defines it's own int types.

    I tried contacting the upstream author, but unsurprisingly after 11 years he doesn't seem to care much and got no answer.

  • Public Transport Line Metadata

    KPublicTransport gives us access to real-time departure and journey information for many public transport systems. However, the presentation of the result isn’t ideal yet, as we are missing access to the characteristic symbols/icons and colors often associated with public transport lines.

This week in KDE: our cup overfloweth with improvements

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KDE

Three main topics will hold the floor today: Dolphin and other file management stuff, Plasma polish, and Wayland–we’re making a bit of a push on Wayland stuff so you should see more Wayland fixes going forward! For all three, we’re concentrating on fixing longstanding issues. There’s more too, of course!

Also, as you’ve no doubt noticed, I’m going to try out sending these posts on Saturday morning Europe time, instead of Sunday. Hopefully it should be a nice way to start your weekend.

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Akademy 2020 and GUADEC 2020 Linux Events Move to Online Conferences

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KDE
GNOME

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s Akademy and GUADEC events hosted by the KDE and GNOME projects have moved to online conferences.

If you had plans on attending Linux and Open Source conferences this year, think again because the coronavirus has changed the way we live, work, and communicate.

As I believed, various of the upcoming Linux events have either been canceled, delayed, or moved to online conferences. Of course, the latter is the best move organizers can do right now.

Earlier this month, when I reported about the release date for the forthcoming GNOME 3.38 desktop environment, due for release on September 16th, 2020, I told you that GUADEC 2020 might take place entirely online.

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Also: Daniel Stenberg: curl better – video

Plasma Browser Integration 1.7.5

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KDE

I’m pleased to announce the immediate availability of Plasma Browser Integration version 1.7.5 on the Chrome Web Store as well as Firefox Add-Ons page. I hope you’re all safe and well in these odd times. As you can tell from the version number this is a little more than just a maintenance release. It comes with an assortment of important bug fixes, refinements, and translation updates.

Plasma Browser Integration bridges the gap between your browser and the Plasma desktop. It lets you share links, find browser tabs in KRunner, monitor download progress in the notification center, and control music and video playback anytime from within Plasma, or even from your phone using KDE Connect!

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FreeBSD progress on Slimbook Base14

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KDE
BSD

Two-and-a-half years ago, I got a KDE Slimbook, and it was an excellent machine – price-competitive with similar hardware, but supporting the Free Software world. I think it came with KDE neon pre-installed, but it has run many other things in the meantime.

This Christmas, my son’s second-hand Dell laptop power brick exploded (the battery was already dead) and so there was one obvious solution: get myself a new Slimbook, and hand down the KDE Slimbook to him. So he now has my Gitlab diversity sticker, and a nopetopus, and a KDE neon installation on a fine – but somewhat battered looking – laptop.

I have a new shiny thing, the Slimbook Base 14. Again, price-competitive, Free Software positive, and a nice shiny machine. It has a Purr sticker and also a Run BSD sticker, openSUSE and adopteunchaton. Cats seem to be the thing for this laptop.

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The KWinFT Project by Roman Gilg

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
KDE
  • The KWinFT project

    I am pleased to announce the KWinFT project and with it the first public release of its major open source offerings KWinFT and Wrapland, drop-in replacements for KDE's window manager KWin and its accompanying KWayland library.

    The KWinFT project was founded by me at the beginning of this year with the goal to accelerate the development significantly in comparison to KWin. Classic KWin can only be moved with caution, since many people rely on it in their daily computing and there are just as many other stakeholders. In this respect, at least for some time, I anticipated to be able to push KWinFT forward in a much more dynamic way.

  • KDE's window manager KWin gets forked with 'KWinFT' to accelerate the development and better Wayland

    Stick a fork in it! KDE's window manager KWin officially has a full fork with a new project called KWinFT, with an aim to support modern development practices and further expand Wayland support.

    Announced by Roman Gilg, the same developer who became a contractor for Valve last year and part of that work was actually to improve KWin so it looks like this may have come as a result of that. What's interesting about KWinFT, is that it's supposed to be a "drop-in replacements for KDE's window manager KWin and its accompanying KWayland library" making it easy to get started with it.

    Gilg said they did this because "Classic KWin can only be moved with caution, since many people rely on it in their daily computing and there are just as many other stakeholders" so they can push through more advanced changes and overhauls.

  • KWinFT: KDE's KWin Forked To Focus On Better Wayland Support, Modern Technologies

    Longtime KDE developer and former Blue Systems engineer, Roman Gilg, has announced his forking of KDE's KWin window manager / compositor and the subsequent first release of this new KWinFT project.

    KWinFT is out with its first public release as a drop-in replacement for the upstream KWin window manager as well as its KWayland library. Replacing the KWayland library is Wrapland as its new fork. KWinFT + Wrapland has been underway since the start of 2020 to "accelerate the development significantly in comparison to classic KWin."

Don't miss Akademy 2020 — This Year KDE is going Online!

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KDE

The KDE Community will be hosting Akademy 2020 online between Friday 4th and Friday 11th September.

The conference is expected to draw hundreds of attendees from the global KDE Community. Participants will showcase, discuss and plan the future of the Community and its technology. Members from the broader Free and Open Source Software community, local organizations and software companies will also attend.

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More in Tux Machines

FSF Chasing Members and GNU Project Has a Dozen New Releases This Month

  • Don’t miss your chance to win fabulous prizes: Get your friends to join the FSF!

    As you may already know, every associate member is incredibly valuable to the Free Software Foundation (FSF). Since most of our funding comes from individual donations and memberships, associate members aren’t just a number. Each new membership magnifies our reach and our ability to effect social change, by demonstrating your commitment to the crucial cause of software freedom. Right now, FSF associate members have the opportunity to reap some fantastic rewards by participating in our virtual LibrePlanet membership drive. We still have the raffle prizes generously donated by Technoethical, Vikings, JMP.chat, and ThinkPenguin for this year’s LibrePlanet conference, which we held entirely online this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, we’re giving them away to those who go the extra mile to help us grow by referring new annual associate members to sign up!

  • May GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 12 new releases!

    bison-3.6.2 denemo-2.4.0 emms-5.4 freeipmi-1.6.5 gcc-10.1.0 gdb-9.2 gnuastro-0.12 gnuhealth-3.6.4 mediagoblin-0.10.0 nano-4.9.3 nettle-3.6 parallel-20200522

Programming: SDL, QML, Python, Awk/Bash and More

  • Photoframe Hack

    Sometimes you just want to get something done. Something for yourself. You do not intend it to be reused, or even pretty. You build a tool. My tool was a photoframe with some basic overlays. I wanted the family calendar, some weather information (current temperature + forecast), time, and the next bus heading for the train station. [...] I also have a bunch of REST calls to my local home assistant server. Most of these reside in the HassButton class, but I also get the current temperature from there. These are hardcoded for my local network, so needs refactoring to be used outside of my LAN. All of these interfaces require API keys of one kind or another – be it a proper key, or a secret URL. These are pulled from environment variables in main.cpp and then exposed to QML. That way, you can reuse the components without having to share your secrets.

  • Writing the Ultimate Locking Check

    In theory a clever programmer could discover all the bugs in a piece of software just by examining it carefully, but in reality humans can't keep track of everything and they get distracted easily. A computer could use the same logic and find the bugs through static analysis. There are two main limitations for static analysis. The first is that it is hard to know the difference between a bug and feature. Here we're going to specify that holding a lock for certain returns is a bug. This rule is generally is true but occasionally the kernel programmers hold a lock deliberately. The second limitation is that to understand the code, sometimes you need to understand how the variables are related to each other. It's difficult to know in advance which variables are related and it's impossible to track all the relationships without running out of memory. This will become more clear later. Nevertheless, static analysis can find many bugs so it is a useful tool. Many static analysis tools have a check for locking bugs. Smatch has had one since 2002 but it wasn't exceptional. My first ten patches in the Linux kernel git history fixed locking bugs and I have written hundreds of these fixes in the years since. When Smatch gained the ability to do cross function analysis in 2010, I knew that I had to re-write the locking check to take advantage of the new cross function analysis feature. When you combine cross function analysis with top of the line flow analysis available and in depth knowledge of kernel locks then the result is the Ultimate Locking Check! Unfortunately, I have a tendency towards procrastination and it took me a decade to get around to it, but it is done now. This blog will step through how the locking analysis works.

  • Raising the ground

    To read this blog I recommend you to be familiar with C programming language and (not mandatory) basics about SDL2. The main goal of this blog is not to give you a copy and paste code, instead it will guide you along the way until you get results by your own merit, also if you find any issues/mistakes/room for improvement please leave a response, thanks for reading.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #422 (May 26, 2020)
  • Real Python: A Beginner's Guide to Pip

    What is pip? pip is the standard package manager for Python. It allows you to install and manage additional packages that are not part of the Python standard library. This course is an introduction to pip for new Pythonistas.

  • Awk Cheatsheet And Examples

    Awk is a great utility for text parsing and maniupulation. All unix operating systems have Awk installed by default. If you are on Windows. Please check out at the bottom of this tutorial on how to install and enable awk on Windows.

  • Printing repeats within repeats, and splitting a list into columns

    Repeats within repeats. BASH printf is a complex piece of machinery. The man page says a printf command should look like printf FORMAT [ARGUMENT]..., which makes it seem the "argument" is the thing to be printed and the "format" describes how.

Devices/Embedded With Linux

  • Gemini Lake industrial mini-PCs are loaded with USB and COM ports

    GigaIPC latest QBiX Series industrial mini-PCs run Linux or Windows on Intel Gemini Lake and offer up to 8x USB and 5x COM ports plus dual displays, GbE, SATA III, M.2, and ruggedization features. Taiwanese computer vendor Gigabyte primarily produces consumer and enterprise desktop PC and server equipment, so we were surprised in 2017 when it launched an embedded 3.5-inch, Intel Apollo Lake GA-SBCAP3350 SBC. The following year in 2018, Gigabyte spun off GigaIPC as an embedded unit, and it has already generated a large catalog of Intel-based products including Micro-ATX, Mini-ITX, thin Mini-ITX, and 110 x 105mm “10×10” boards. There are 15 different 3.5-inch “QBi Pro” boards much like the GA-SBCAP3350, but also available with Whiskey Lake and Kaby Lake-U processors.

  • 19″ Rackmounts Support up to 12 Raspberry Pi SBCs

    Last time, we wrote about myelectronics.nl we covered their Tesla Cybertruck Case for Intel NUCs which housed the mini PC into a mini CyberTruck looking enclosure. The company has now come up with new housing solutions specifically designed for Raspberry Pi 1/2/3/4 Model B/B+ boards.

  • PoE-ready Ryzen V1000 SBC is all about camera control

    Axiomtek’s “MIRU130” SBC targets embedded vision applications with a Ryzen V1000 SoC, 4x USB 3.1 Gen2, HDMI and DP ports, cam triggers and lighting controls, 2x M.2, PCIe x16, and 4x GbE ports, 2x of which offer PoE. Axiomtek recently launched a CAPA13R, joineing Seco’s similarly 3.5-inch SBC-C90 as the only SBCs we have seen based on AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V100. Now Axiomtek has returned with a larger, V1000-based MIRU130 motherboard with a 244 x 170mm form factor that falls in between Mini-ITX and Micro-ATX.

  • IAR Systems Delivers Efficient Embedded Software Building on Linux

    Through the C/C++ compiler and debugger toolchain IAR Embedded Workbench®, IAR Systems provides its customers with the market's most diverse microcontroller support as well as adapted licensing options to fit different organizations' needs. This flexibility is now extended to the build environment as the well-known build tools in IAR Embedded Workbench now support Linux. The tools offer leading code quality, outstanding optimizations for size and speed, and fast build times. Supporting implementation in Linux-based frameworks for automated application build and test processes, the tools enable large-scale deployments of critical software building and testing and is suitable for installations ranging from a few licenses on a small build server, to massive installations with several hundreds of parallel builds active at the same time.

  • Librem 5 April 2020 Software Development Update

    This is another incarnation of the software development progress for the Librem 5. This time for April 2020 (weeks 14-18). Some items are covered in more detail in separate blog posts at https://puri.sm/news. The idea of this summaries is so you can have a closer look at the coding and design side of things. It also shows how much we’re standing on the shoulders of giants reusing existing software and how contributions are flowing back and forth. So these reports are usually rather link heavy pointing to individual merge requests on https://source.puri.sm/ or to the upstream side (like e.g. GNOME’s gitlab.)

Games: Burning Knight, Elder Scrolls, Cities: Skylines and PyGame

  • Burning Knight is a roguelike where you rob a dungeon, coming soon

    At least the setting is honest, you're totally robbing the dungeons in Burning Knight and then attempting to flee. Burning Knight is an action-packed procedurally generated roguelike, with fast-paced action and plenty of exploration across various floors in the Burning Knight's castle that you're stealing goods from. It can turn into a bullet-hell in some rooms, there's hundreds of items to find and they can be combined to "build your very own game-breaking combos" and it does sound awesome. The developer, Rexcellent Games, just announced on Twitter yesterday that it's now actually complete. They're waiting on Valve's approval, and it looks like it will hopefully release next month. SteamDB captured the date changing to June 5 but that might be a temporary date.

  • Stadia gets Elder Scrolls Online on June 16, 1440p in web and more

    A few bits of Stadia news for you as Google have announced the next set of additions coming to their game streaming service. For players who were a bit let down by resolution options, there's some good news. As some players already saw across the last few weeks and today being made properly official, 1440p is now an option when playing Stadia in a web browser.

  • Humble Cities: Skylines Bundle is up for some easy city building

    Cities: Skylines, one of the finest city builders ever is now available in a big Humble Bundle for you to grab the base game and lots of extra content. This is honestly a ridiculously good deal and probably the cheapest Cities: Skylines has ever been. For £1 you can get Cities: Skylines and the Deep Focus Radio DLC. Even if you only go for that, there's a lot to enjoy without any expansions.

  • Python Qt5 - PyQt5 and PyGame compatibility with source code.

    This tutorial tries to solve from the objectives related to solving and stabilizing compatibility errors between PyQt4 and PyQt5 and creating a common interface between PyQt5 and PyGame. There is always the same problem in programming when the developer for some reason has to change classes, methods and functions and reusing the old code is no longer valid. In this case, common or other errors occur, which leads to a waste of time.