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KDE

Moving from Windows 7 to Plasma? Do it the Easy Way!

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KDE

Redmond will no longer provide updates for the 2009 operating system. This puts almost a billion people in the difficult situation of facing increased security risks alongside a slow decline in software availability.

Folks who reject Microsoft’s forced updates are already opting to regain control over their systems by switching to the friendly and full-featured Plasma desktop, built on a design philosophy which centers freedom and respect for its users. Recent buzz about the possibilities of Plasma has brought a lot of fresh faces on board, and now they are trying to navigate a new operating system that has its differences from Windows.

If you’re one of those people, you’re probably wondering where you can find experienced users to help you get settled in.

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Manjaro with KDE on a MacBook Pro

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
Mac

With that away, I just installed purely Manjaro Linux on my MacBook last evening, who cares, I anyways don’t use macOS at all beside as VirtualBox startup environment.

I searched for some pointers in the internet, in the past I already had some parallel install. If you search a bit, you will find various hints how to do it.

[...]

For me this did the job and the stuff is running well enough. The webcam won’t work without additional effort, not that I use it. No idea if Bluetooth or other stuff like the Thunderbolt ports work, but I never used that even on macOS.

Fortunately the HiDPI support on Linux & Qt & KDE has gone a long way since my initial try 2015 and now, with some scaling of 1.5 or 2, it is all nicely usable ;=)

Given I still have some macOS machines available at work, I might still try out some Kate bundles there from time to time, but my personal life is now macOS free.

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Krita in 2019 and 2020

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KDE

Let’s have some statistics first! Statistics are fun! (And notoriously unreliable) We started 2019 with about 450 open bugs — and that’s how we ended 2019. That said, we had 1236 new bug reports and closed 1272. Still, our 2018 fund raiser was all about getting rid of bugs, and that seems to be a tough proposition.

According to openhub, we had 2271 commits from 60 contributors. This excludes translation commits, because those are still done in a subversion repository, apart from Krita. We had nine releases (4.2.0 to 4.2.8) in 2019, slightly less than we’d planned, we’d wanted to have twelve releases. We had four Google Summer of Code students, and most of their work has already been merged and will be in Krita 4.3.0: a new magnetic selection tool, the history docker and the android port.

Next to fixing bugs, we’re work on that 4.3.0 release, but the main reason why 4.3.0 didn’t happen in 2019 was because rewriting the core system for loading brushes, gradients and so turns out to be much more work than we had ever thought. We should have approached that much more gradually, but we couldn’t figure out how to make that work.

We had 2,346,618 unique downloads from the download page on this website; that excludes downloads from other download sites, downloads from release announcements or downloads from the various stores. At a guess, we’ll have topped 3,000,000 downloads in total this year.

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Jonathan Riddell Announces Zanshin 0.5.71

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KDE
Software
  • ZANSHIN 0.5.71

    The GPG signing key for the tar is Jonathan Riddell with 0xEC94D18F7F05997E.

  • Jonathan Riddell: Zanshin 0.5.71

    We are happy and proud to announce the immediate availability of Zanshin 0.5.71.

    This updates the code to work with current libraries and apps from Kontact.

KDE: Google, C++ and Qt, Developer Documentation Update

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KDE
  • Akonadi / KMail and Google accounts

    You can see the consequences of that oversight in KDE bugs, for instance kmail no longer allows addition of gmail account or Dolphin Kio-gdrive authentication with Google account fails. There are probably multiple duplicates in KDE’s bugzilla as well.

    The Google account used for the integration – the one that “owns” the API tokens and a few other things – has the KDE e.V. board email attached to it. That’s sensible, since Google integration in KDE applications and frameworks is something institutional, not personal (so it wouldn’t make sense to have any individual developer’s address on it). The e.V. exists to support the community, after all.

    This does mean that when things break with the integration – and they have been broken, for months now – the board gets email with questions. This is a semi-official statement from the board about what’s going on (semi-, because it is on my personal blog, and statements like “I don’t know” and “I don’t use” are personal, not institutional).

  • gbgcpp – Ribbons using Qt

    I’ve been involved in the gbgcpp group, a part of the larger Sweden C++ community, for a couple of years. It is fun to see that there is a lot of C++ developers out there, once you start looking for them.

    In the next meetup, this Wednesday, there will be both C++ and Qt. The topic is to implement Ribbons in Qt, based on a seminar by Dag Brück. If you happen to be in the vicinity of Gothenburg, I recommend you to go there!

  • My KDE in 2019: Developer Documentation Update

    Late 2019 year-end post, I know. It’s been a rather busy start to the new year even when I tried to hit the ground running. Unfortunately, some things like blog posts have taken a backseat. Hopefully not for long.

    2019 was a wild year for me personally and I don’t mean that in the completely good sense. One of the highlights, though, was being hired to do contractual work for KDE as a technical writer and documentation specialist. TL;DR I went through KDE’s developer docs and queried a few devs on the state of the documentation and what needs to be done to make it easier for new developers to get started using our libraries/frameworks and contribute to KDE projects.

    It was definitely an honor to formally work for the community. I have been a sporadic contributor (lately more just helping out on IRC) and getting the chance to work on more technical matters again and be involved on a deeper level was exciting. Plus, the accountability definitely helped in the motivation aspect. Sadly, due to personal circumstances, I wasn’t able to follow up on the matter after the contract formally ended. Fortunately, that period is over and I can get the ball rolling again.

    [...]

    2019 was spent for analysis and planning so, hopefully, 2020 will be spent putting all of these into action. Writing documentation is often seen as a boring task but, especially when it comes to developer documentation, it can be the perfect opportunity to become familiar with the software and libraries, the tools and processes, and, most importantly, with the people and the community that make KDE awesome

Events: conf.kde.in, FOSS conferences and GNU Guix

Filed under
GNU
KDE
OSS
  • conf.kde.in (beforehand)

    It’s been ages since I last saw Shantanu, and many of the other speakers are new to me. I’m particularly interested in the Malayalam angle presented by Subin Siby, for one thing because the Malayalam translation of Calamares is a work of art.

    I’m presenting a few things at the conference – something about Calamares, and also something about using Transifex. Getting good translations for Free Software products is an important thing for making that Free Software available to the next billion Free Software contributors. (The “next billion” is something I’ll credit Samson Goddy and the Open Source Festival with; I dream of speaking there some day as well.)

    The conference schedule is somewhat relaxed, so I expect to spend lots of time either sitting and hacking with attendees, or coming up with impromptu sessions on other topics. For season of KDE there are a couple of projects related to Rocs (a graph theory IDE) which I’m mentoring, and there’s always room for more work, more enthusiastic users.

  • Efstathios Iosifidis: How to survive a health crisis during a FOSS conference

    The title describes everything. This is not only for FOSS conferences but events in general. Attending a conference meens meet friends (usually you meet once a year) and have fun in general.

    The organizers are responsible for everything that happens during the conference hours. We are grown people, so we have to be responsible for the rest of the day. Sometimes bad things might happen (bad: the critical meaning is health issues). Although the organizers aren't responsible for that, they are the key people, who know the system at their country and it's good and human thing to help the person with the problem. Everyone wants to have fun and be happy at the end of the conference.

    Being an organizer and volunteer, I lived the frustration of having everything covered. I lived couple of times the health crisis during the conference.

    Here are some points to cover before and during the conference. Please leave a comment if you want to share your experience.

  • Join GNU Guix through Outreachy Join GNU Guix through Outreachy

    We are happy to announce that for the fourth time GNU Guix offers a three-month internship through Outreachy, the inclusion program for groups traditionally underrepresented in free software and tech.

  • Meet Guix at FOSDEM

    As usual, GNU Guix will be present at FOSDEM on February 1st and 2nd. This year, we’re happy to say that there will be quite a few talks about Guix and related projects!

Interview with Never Dot

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

I had been using Fractal Design’s Painter (now Corel’s) for many years, over a decade, and while I depended on it immensely, it was also somewhat buggy and the numerous upgrades I’d purchased were always introducing more problems than solutions for me. As such, I was pushed to find an alternative. I looked into Sai and Clip Studio Paint as being well received in the community. I was avoiding Photoshop both due to the subscription requirement and the fact it wasn’t directly targeted at natural media painting. Krita came up in my research as being a free painting tool. I checked out numerous YouTube reviews and comparisons, and being free let me try it out directly.

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This week in KDE: more speed, more features, and a bug massacre

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KDE

This week should have a little something for everyone. We’ve got bug squashing galore in preparation for Plasma 5.18, substantial speed improvements for wifi connection and Discover launch time, some welcome new features, and the return of an old one–renaming files from the context menu in file dialogs.

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KDE: FreeBSD, Akonadi and Kdenlive

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KDE
  • KDE FreeBSD 2020.1

    Current state-of-the-art in KDE-FreeBSD land is that we’re all up-to-date, almost. I updated sayonara and except for Quaternion I’m all set. Quaternion has a bunch of releases after 0.0.9.4 which are all tweaks on the AppImage or FlatPak versions, not on the actual application.

    Zanshin was briefly removed from FreeBSD ports because the last release isn’t compatible with current KDE Frameworks and Akonadi releases, but both Debian and openSUSE have suitable patches (some from upstream) to get it working.

    KDE Frameworks 5.66 were released today, and we don’t have those yet. 5.65, though, that’s in.

    Along with Qt 5.13.2, KDE release service 19.12.0 (the .1 came out two days ago, also too-soon), KDE Plasma 5.17.5 (four days old), KDevelop 5.4.4. All of that is up-to-date. Looking at the KDE Planet we’re missing the latest Kdenlive (one day old) and KTimeTracker as well. Oh, and GCompris! So I suppose you could call the FreeBSD ports tree, with respect to KDE products at least, a rolling release.

  • Kontact | Akonadi Reference

    The killer feature of the Plasma Desktop has been the KDE Personal Information Manager, Kontact. I have been using it since 2004 time frame and although we have had a tenuous relationship over the years, specifically the switch to the Akonadi and the pain that came with it in the early years. I actively use Kontact on multiple machines for the feature richness of it and haven’t found anything in existence that I like better. I also exclusively use Kontact on openSUSE Tumbleweed with the Plasma Desktop Environment.

    I have decided to publish my reference concerning the maintenance it requires. I could be an edge case since I have five mail accounts and multiple calendar accounts as well. Historically, I have had issues where losing network connection, regaining it, suspending and resuming my machine over a period of time would cause the thing to have fits. So, here are my fixes, whenever the need arises.

    One quick caveat, your results may vary and don’t hold me responsible for your data.

  • Lighting the Emby Server with Kdenlive

    I recently posted about my computer build. In short, this is a computer build on parts that are in no way considered top of the line. They are all quite old and that did pose a few problems. One, this motherboard would not boot from a software RAID pool. I was able to bootstrap the BTRFS RAID pool with a separate drive and root partition. It did add some complexity to my system but I think it works out okay.

    Building a system is something I have wanted to do for quite some time. As in, several years but time, finances and decision vapor-lock had kept me from it. What pushed me over was a fortuitous conversation at a Christmas gathering last year, I struck a nerdy conversation, with a computer store owner that ultimately gave me this giant Thermaltake case without a motherboard and a few weeks later, another fortuitous happening where I was given a bunch of old computer equipment and an AM3 motherboard was among the rest of the aged equipment which drove the rest of the build. My course of action was to stuff the most memory and fastest processor in that which is what I did and I am happy with it. I am not going to belabor that process as I have talked about it before and I have a link you can follow if you are interested in those details.

    As a result of this, I had tons of fun, it was a great learning experience and that same guy gave me another case, not as big but far more robust in design with a water cooler. I now want to build another machine but I am thinking a more pure gaming machine and leave this current machine to be my server workstation. I don’t know when I would get to this but I think this one will be a project I do with my kids. Use it as a teaching opportunity and turn it into a kind of family event. Currently, the machine has a Core 2 Duo CPU platform of some kind. I think I would probably do another AMD build, something newer that can take advantage of these new fancy CPUs coming out. I still wouldn’t go bleeding edge but certainly something closer than what I have now.

    [...]

    Kdenlive is a great application with a lot more features than I know how to even use. I don’t do any complex video editing. I don’t have good video equipment so I don’t have a real high level of motivation to create a lot of video content at this time. You can only polish a turd so much and I am often not happy with the video I shoot. I am happy, however, with what I can do with the video in Kdenlive. It does make turning the lack-luster video into barely acceptable video content. Editing with Kdenlive is easy to use and is enjoyable to turn the mess I start with into something more usable. I would like to make more excuses to do more video content because the great user experience Kdenlive provides.

    I have heard of people complain that Kdenlive isn’t stable, well, that is a bunch of hooey. Kdenlive on openSUSE Tumbleweed works fantastically well without any crashing. I am very thankful for fantastic packaging and QA process from the openSUSE Project and I am very grateful for every programmer that has had a hand in every piece of this, from the Linux kernel to the Plasma desktop to the application itself. Thank you for all your time and efforts.

Kdenlive 19.12.1 is out

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KDE

Kdenlive 19.12.1 is out with many bug fixes and usability improvements. For the whole 19.12 release cycle we will continue focusing on polishing the rough edges in preparation the next major release in April.

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More in Tux Machines

MauiKit Aims to Bring Apps That Can Run on Linux and Android

Creating the same apps and software for different platforms is not an easy task for the developers. To make an app run on desktops, developers need to write a source code. However, to make the same app run on mobile devices, the developers have to write a different source code. With the new MauiKit, developers would be able to build convergent apps, that can run on both platforms with the same source code. Read more

Games: Steam on Focal Fossa, osu! Comes to GNU/Linux

  • Canonical need a little testing hand for a newer Steam package on Ubuntu 20.04

    With Ubuntu 20.04 "Focal Fossa" being released in the next few months, the team over at Canonical are looking for a little help testing their updated Steam package. To be clear, this is only for the 20.04 release, they're not looking for feedback for earlier versions of Ubuntu. It's not a drastic change to the Steam package with it pulling in an update from Debian, but this newer build does have updated udev rules for some devices. Canonical also did some of their own tweaks for NVIDIA due to the differences between Ubuntu and Debian. You will need to use a temporary PPA which will be removed when the test is over, found over here. They need people to try clean installs without any Steam, upgrading from an existing Steam install and purge removals of the steam package. Additionally, testing with a Steam Controller and supported VR devices would help them too.

  • Popular free rhythm game 'osu!' now provides a Linux build with releases

    osu!, going under the current development name of osu!lazer is a very popular free rhythm game and they're now doing official builds for Linux gamers. It's actually inspired by an older game called Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan, which was released in 2005 for the Nintendo DS. osu! was originally only available for Windows, then ported to macOS and eventually they started work on osu!lazer as an open source remake of the original client to eventually replace it. There's been various unofficial builds out there, since it's open source and up on GitHub but they're now making Linux a bit more official.

Software: QOwnNotes, Searchmonkey, Remote Touchpad and Google Maps Plugins for WordPress

  • Norbert Preining: QOwnNotes for Debian

    QOwnNotes is a cross-platform plain text and markdown note taking application. By itself, it wouldn’t be something to talk about, we have vim and emacs and everything in between. But QOwnNotes integrates nicely with the Notes application from NextCloud and OwnCloud, as well as providing useful integration with NextCloud like old version of notes, access to deleted files, watching changes, etc.

  • Searchmonkey – A powerful desktop search app for Linux

    In our day to day activities, we need to search for specific files in our Linux systems. These can be documents, texts, and even multimedia data including video and audio files.  Linux comes with a powerful command-line tool (Terminal), that enables users to search for data and text using various command-line arguments. One advantage of using the Terminal is it supports the use of regular expressions and scripting. Having said that, not everyone is well-versed with the many Linux commands; this brings forth the demand for having an interactive and reliable Graphical User Interface. One of such powerful tools is the Searchmonkey application.

  • Remote Touchpad: Control Mouse & Keyboard from Your Phone

    Remote Touchpad is an open-source utility allows to remote control the mouse and keyboard connected to your computer from the web browser of a smartphone or any other device with a touchscreen. Remote Touchpad supports Flatpak’s RemoteDesktop portal (experimental), Windows and X11. Simply run the utility on your machine. It outputs an URL along with QR code in a terminal window. To take control open the displayed URL or scan the QR code in your phone.

  • Top 10 Best Google Maps Plugin for WordPress (2020)

    A touch webpage is far more of use with an internet map. This guide shows the top 10 best Google maps plugin for WordPress. A traveling site will be that more pleasure for those who (and also you subscribers ) may view in a glance most of the locations you have already been. You will find a lot of motives to incorporate maps onto your own WordPress website, regardless of what your explanation is that you have to have a simple and effective means to perform nothing but that.

FSCRYPT, AMD and Broadcom Work on Linux

  • Linux's FSCRYPT Working On Encryption + Case-Insensitive Support

    FSCRYPT as the file-system encryption framework for the Linux kernel and is currently wired up for EXT4, F2FS, and UBIFS to offer native encryption capabilities is currently seeing improvements so the separate casefolding (case-insensitive) file/folder support can work on encrypted directories.

  • A Few More Linux Kernel Patches Floated This Week For AMD Family 19h (Zen 3)

    Going back to the start of 2020 we've been seeing a few patches here and there around AMD Family 19h, almost certainly Zen 3. That patch work has continued with a few more bits out this week while hopefully more bring-up is on the horizon ahead of the Linux 5.7 merge window opening in just over one month's time. Like the earlier Family 19h EDAC bring-up, this week's work isn't too juicy besides it being refreshing to see AMD punctually getting out Linux kernel patches for forthcoming hardware. The patches this week involve a few additions to AMD's perf subsystem code around the uncore bits. No enticing details of Family 19h are revealed but just shifting code around for supporting the L3 thread mask for the forthcoming CPUs and also the L3 PMU.

  • Broadcom Bringing Up Linux Support For VK Accelerators

    Broadcom developers have been recently volleying open-source Linux driver patches for enabling their "VK Accelerators" on the platform. Broadcom VK Accelerators are PCI Express offload engines for supporting video transcoding on multiple streams in parallel. These VK Accelerators offer various video offload processing features and are exposed to user-space via specialized /dev/bcm-vk.X devices. We haven't yet seen user-space patches to see if Broadcom intends to support any of the common APIs or will be developing their own customized solution. This Broadcom VK offload engine relies upon seemingly closed-source firmware files to be loaded for running the logic on these accelerators.