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KDE

Kdenlive is Now Available on the Snap Store

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KDE

Its arrival on the store will simplify installation of the non-linear editing tool across Linux distributions.

Prior to now an AppImage had been the ‘recommended’ way for Linux users to download and run Kdenlive on Linux desktops like Ubuntu (and if you’re a fan of that method you needn’t worry: the AppImage version isn’t going away).

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Qt Visual Studio Tools 2.4.2 Released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the release of the Qt Visual Studio Tools version 2.4.2!

Installation packages are available at the Visual Studio Marketplace. Please note that, if you installed a previous version of the Qt VS Tools, and if VS extensions are set to update automatically — this is the default setting — chances are your installation is already up-to-date. You can check which version is currently installed by opening the Qt VS Tools menu.

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KDE Projects: KDE PIM, LabPlot and Krita

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KDE
  • News from KDE PIM in September-October 2019

    We’re in autumn for a little while now and not quite winter yet… It’s time for another post about KDE PIM! I’ll be your host to cover September and October and will try to follow in the footsteps of my peers who did a great job the past few months. Unlike Franck, I won’t start with the stats though, you’ll get that at the end. Is it obvious that I’m trying to make sure the stats addicts read through. Wink

  • History of LabPlot

    After the recent release was finalised, there is some time now to have a (very) short break in the development, to take care of some organizational topics around the project and to set the development priorities for the next release. But there is also some time now to look back at where we started several years ago and where we are now. In this blog post we want to look at the history of the code base.

    LabPlot is quite an old project started long time ago, back in KDE3 times. One of the important milestones of this project was the complete rewrite using Qt4/KDELibs4 in 2008. This is when new developers joined the project, at least for a certain period in time, and when the jump from 1.x to 2.x release versioning was done for LabPlot. Starting from zero and lacking a lot of features in the 2.0 release, we gradually evolved release by release by implementing new features and by improving the code base.

  • First Notarized macOS Build of Krita

    What happens is this: we build Krita, then we create an app bundle. Then we zip up the krita.app bundle and transfer the zip file to Apple, which then checks whether Krita uses any forbidden API’s or contains its own html rendering engine and other such things that are highly dangerous for the well-being of the computers it allows its customers to use. Then we get a long string of numbers and letters back, which we can use to periodically check whether Apple is done checking. This can take ages, or happen relatively quickly. Then we need to execute a command to “staple” Apple’s imprimatur to the app bundle.

Qt Creator 4.10.2 released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.10.2 !

In this release we fixed deployment of applications to iOS 13 devices, and added the experimental SerialTerminal plugin to our prebuilt binaries.

Find a more detailed overview of the other fixes that are included in 4.10.2 in our change log.

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KDevelop 5.4.4 released

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Development
KDE

We today provide a bugfix and localization update release with version 5.4.4. This release introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using a previous version of KDevelop 5.4.

You can find the updated Linux AppImage as well as the source code archives on our download page.

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KDDockWidgets

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KDE

KDDockWidgets is an effort by KDAB to provide an advanced docking system for Qt.

Throughout the years KDAB has contributed and funded QDockWidget development. Sadly, this wasn’t without pain: each change took many days to implement and an equal amount of time to fix regressions.

QDockWidget mixes GUI code with logic/state in a spaghetti manner, making it very hard to move forward. In hindsight, what caused this complexity was the combinatorial explosion of options it supports (which seem unneeded to me, as most people just want to use all the features). That, times 3 platforms, which have different nuances, times 2, since code behaves drastically different if you have animations enabled or not.

KDDockWidgets was born from my need to preserve sanity after having worked in two projects that needed extensive customization. One where we tried to work directly upstream but the regression rate ended up being too much. And another one where I took the route of using private API, fake mouse events and event filters, which seemed like a good idea at first, but ended up being a world of pain. Furthermore, our customers were getting more creative with their requests, so it was clear we needed a better docking framework.

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KDE: Developers, Artists and Microsoft DRM

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KDE
  • Disclaimer, Addendum and Celebration

    I am now a “KDE developer”, yay! I’ll be translating much more now that I can push those translations, and hopefully I’ll be able to maintain the KDE announcements in Brazilian Portuguese. Localization for something as big as KDE is a huge task, any help would be appreciated. It’s also fairly easy to work with us, if you’d like.

  • Introducing krita-artists.org

    Freshly returned from the 2019 Blender Conference, Krita project maintainer Boudewijn Rempt was heard to wistfully wish for something like Blender Artists, only for Krita. A central place for artists who use Krita to discuss their work, ask for help, share experiences and reach out to developers. And in the interest of growing the community, not something that needs to be maintained and developed by the current development team, the Krita Foundation or the KDE community.

    Raghavendra Kamath, a professional illustrator who has used Krita for years and years accepted the challenge and has setup over the past week a new website: krita-artists.org. It’s brand new and still slightly experimental, but we’re announcing it today!

  • Windows Store Submission Guide

    To increase the visibility of KDE applications on Windows, the KDE e.V. has a Windows Store account to publish our applications there.

    This is not the only way to get KDE application for the Windows operating system, you can e.g. directly grab installers or portable ZIP files from our Binary Factory.

    There is at the moment no nice documentation how to submit some application to the store.

Qt Creator 4.11 Beta2 released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.11 Beta2 !

We switched to Qt 5.14 and fixed many issues. As always you find more details in our change log.

The opensource version is available on the Qt download page under "Pre-releases", and you find commercially licensed packages on the Qt Account Portal. Qt Creator 4.11 Beta2 is also available under Preview > Qt Creator 4.11.0-beta2 in the online installer. Please post issues in our bug tracker. You can also find us on IRC on #qt-creator on chat.freenode.net, and on the Qt Creator mailing list.

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Nate Graham's Latest KDE Development Report

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KDE
  • This week in KDE: bug squashing and more

    This week we continued fixing bugs in Plasma 5.17! We know that it was a bit buggier than the 5.16 release was, and we strive to do better. If you’d like to help out with this, please test our Plasma beta releases by switching to the unstable/beta testing repos in your rolling release distro of choice. For example, Arch and openSUSE Tumbleweed. Beta releases of KDE apps will show up in these repos as well. It’s super fun! Try it, you’ll like it!

  • KDE's Dolphin Now Lets Users Know What's Preventing A Drive From Being Unmounted

    - The Dolphin file manager now shows what is blocking a drive/volume from being unmounted.

    - Gwenview import improvements.

    - Random wallpaper slideshows have now been restored to be random again.

    - Discover can now cancel the installation of Snap apps without freezing.

KDE: Taking Itinerary to the Next Level

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KDE

KDE Itinerary is a project to get your travel itinerary presented to you in a unified, well structured and always up to date fashion, by extracting structured data from emails, boarding passes, and other sources. I successfully traveled the world with it!

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More in Tux Machines

Librem 5 Longevity: Solving The Problem of Disposable Technology

I’ve been using GNU/Linux (“Linux”) as my desktop OS for over twenty years now. Throughout all of that time, one thing that I’ve loved about Linux on the desktop is how it can take a so-called “slow” and “old” computer and can breathe new life into it. Back when Installfests were a thing (events where people would bring computers to Linux Users’ Groups and get help installing Linux on them) often people would bring in second-hand computers, sometimes found in the trash or given away by companies after they were deemed too slow to run Windows. After Linux was installed they performed like they were new and the user now had a computer they could use for years to come. There were even programs that would refurbish second-hand computers, put Linux on them and provide them to schools who wouldn’t have computers otherwise. However bloated some people might think Linux is today compared to the “good old days” this effect still holds true–take a machine that’s too slow to run something else, and put Linux on it, and it’s like a new computer. Linux’s low resource needs compared to everything else not only meant resurrecting computers that would otherwise end up in a landfill, it also meant if you were fortunate enough that you could afford a new computer, you could expect many more years of service out of the hardware, with OS updates that either improved performance (as hardware support improved) or at least maintained the existing performance. Many large companies assume their computers will last around 2-3 years before they need to be replaced but in my experience I get at least twice that longevity with Linux on the desktop. My personal laptop is a first generation Librem 13 I bought in 2015 (I participated in the original crowdfunding campaign long before I worked here). I run Qubes on it and even after four years I don’t feel any need for a new laptop yet–it still works as well as it did when I bought it. Before that I had a Thinkpad X200s I bought brand new and had used for about six years before it started to show its age. Even now my wife uses that X200s as a secondary computer for writing. Read more

The Latest Hardware Defects

  • Patch, Or Your Solid State Drives Roll Over And Die

    Expiration dates for computer drives? That’s what a line of HP solid-state drives are facing as the variable for their uptime counter is running out. When it does, the drive “expires” and, well, no more data storage for you! There are a series of stages in the evolution of a software developer as they master their art, and one of those stages comes in understanding that while they may have a handle on the abstracted world presented by their development environment they perhaps haven’t considered the moments in which the real computer that lives behind it intrudes. Think of the first time you saw an SQL injection attack on a website, for example, or the moment you realised that a variable type is linked to the physical constraints of the number of memory locations it has reserved for it. So people who write software surround themselves with an armoury of things they watch out for as they code, and thus endeavour to produce software less likely to break. Firmly in that arena is the size of the variables you use and what will happen when that limit is reached.

  • New Plundervolt attack impacts Intel CPUs

Android Leftovers

Andes’ RISC-V SoC debuts with AI-ready VPU as Microchip opens access to its PolarFire SoC

Andes unveiled a Linux-ready, RISC-V-based “AndesCore 27-series” CPU core that features a VPU for AI applications. In other RISC-V on Linux news, Microchip opened early access to its FPGA-enabled PolarFire SoC and Hex Five announced MultiZone Security for Linux. In conjunction with the RISC-V Summit in San Jose this week, Andes Technology announced a Linux-focused RISC-V core design that it says is the first to include a vector processing unit (VPU). Meanwhile, Microchip announced an early access program for its previously announced, Linux-friendly PolarFire SoC, and there’s a new MultiZone Security for Linux application for RISC-V chips from Hex Five Security that will initially run on the PolarFire SoC (see farther below). Read more