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KDE

Open-source divorce for Apple's Safari?

Filed under
KDE
Mac

Two years after it selected open-source rendering engine KHTML as the basis of its Safari Web browser, Apple Computer has proposed resolving compatibility conflicts by scrapping that code base in favor of its own.

KDE's Switch to Subversion Complete

Filed under
KDE

The conversion of KDE's source repository from CVS to Subversion is now complete. This is the largest ever change from CVS to Subversion. The conversion script ran for a total of 38 hours from start to completion. All KDE developers with CVS accounts now have Subversion accounts.

Pascal Spotted

Filed under
KDE

Pascal provides a lot of rpms for the SUSE community… But also at this years FOSDEM he guided a group of 20 KDE-hackers through Brussels to a secret hacking location.

Qt 4.0 Progress

Filed under
KDE

Qt4 is really progressing well. The only problem at this point is that it still changes a lot even after Beta 2... So what’s new in Qt land since Beta 2?

KDE Kommander Arbitrary Code Execution Vulnerability

Filed under
KDE
Security

Eckhart Wörner has reported a vulnerability in KDE, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

Cross Platform PIM on a Stick

Filed under
KDE

Available for memory sticks on Windows or Linux, the new release KDE-PIM/Platform independent lets you carry around your favourite KDE applications and your personal data in the palm of your hand. This device independent software can import your data directly from Outlook and sync it with KDE-PIM running on other computers. Based on the great work of the KDE-PIM developers, KDE-PIM/Pi is available for Windows, Linux and the Zaurus PDA and includes platform independent versions of KAddressbook and KOrganizer (Screenshots).

KDE kdelibs PCX Image Buffer Overflow Vulnerability

Filed under
KDE
Security

Bruno Rohee has reported a higthly critical vulnerability in KDE kdelibs, which potentially can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a vulnerable system.

The Linux Box Show: Aaron Seigo on KDE's Future

Filed under
KDE
-s

KDE developer Aaron J. Seigo on The Linux Box Show speaks of the new Appeal project and what that means for kde 4.0. He outlines three main principals for the Appeal project and that adds up to more eye candy and functionality for all.

KDE 3.4 offers improved accessibility

Filed under
KDE

zdnet has a nice little article covering KDE 3.4 accessibility features. They say, "An improved colour scheme and a tool that reads out text should make KDE Linux desktop more usable for those whose vision is impaired."

"It's a huge improvement in accessibility," said Matthias Dalheimer, a KDE developer. "There is a new screen reading technology for visually impaired people and a much better colour scheme with icons that have a high contrast."

KDE DCop DoS Vulnerability prior to 3.4

Filed under
KDE
Security

Sebastian Krahmer has reported a vulnerability in KDE, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

The vulnerability is caused due to an error in the authentication process in the DCOP (Desktop Communication Protocol) daemon dcopserver. This can be exploited to lock the dcopserver for arbitrary local users. Successful exploitation may result in decreased desktop functionality for the affected user.

The vulnerability has been reported in versions prior to 3.4.

Solution: Upgrade to KDE 3.4 or apply patch.

Click for more information and links to patches.

Original information on dot.kde.org.

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More in Tux Machines

QOwnNotes for Debian (update)

Some time ago I posted about QOwnNotes for Debian. My recent experience with the openSUSE Build System has convinced me to move also the QOwnNotes packages there, which allows me to provide builds for Debian/Buster, Debian/testing, and Debian/sid, all for both i386 and amd64 architectures. To repeat a bit about QOwnNotes, it is a cross-platform plain text and markdown note taking application. By itself, it wouldn’t be something to talk about, we have vim and emacs and everything in between. But QOwnNotes integrates nicely with the Notes application from NextCloud and OwnCloud, as well as providing useful integration with NextCloud like old version of notes, access to deleted files, watching changes, etc. Read more

Firefox for Remote Work and Streaming

Devices: Raspberry Pi, WinSystems and Estone

  • How to Fight Coronavirus With Your Raspberry Pi

    With the coronavirus pandemic raging, many PC users have dedicated CPU cycles to medical research using Folding@Home (we’re even doing a fold-off competition with AnandTech). Though Folding@Home does not run on a Raspberry Pi, you can participate in Rosetta@Home, a similar project that’s also researching COVID-19, by installing a free Linux app called BOINC. BOINC has been around for a long time and supports many different research projects, including Asteroids@Home, which does space research, and some of these projects will work on Raspbian, Raspberry Pi’s official OS. However, the addition of Rosetta@Home is new, and if you want to join that project, you need to run BOINC on a 64-bit operating system (OS), such as Ubuntu (64-bit). Rosetta@Home will not give you any workloads if you try it in Raspbian. Here’s how to use your Raspberry Pi to fight coronavirus with BOINC and Rosetta@Home.

  • Compact Apollo Lake computer runs Linux

    WinSystems’ fanless, Linux-ready “SYS-ITX-N-3900” computer has an Apollo Lake SoC, -20 to 60°C support, wide-range power, M.2 and mini-PCIe expansion, and a compact 150 x 150 x 50mm footprint. A year and a half after the first Intel Gemini Lake based embedded computers arrived, we have seen only a few models based on this latest Atom family of chips. Gemini Lake continues to be in short supply, as it has been since its arrival. Yet, the industry keeps churning out computers based on the similarly 14nm fabricated Apollo Lake platform. The latest is WinSystems’ fanless SYS-ITX-N-3900, which runs Linux or Windows 10 IoT on dual- or quad-core Apollo Lake Atom SoCs.

  • i.MX8M Mini Pico-ITX board has a DSP for voice control plus optional AI

    Estone’s “EMB-2237-AI” Pico-ITX SBC integrates a “SOM-2237” module that runs Linux on an i.MX8M Mini and adds a DSP for audio. The carrier adds LAN with PoE, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, mics and speakers, and an M.2 slot with Edge TPU AI support. Estone Technology’s EMB-2237-AI is the first SBC we’ve seen to combine the 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX form-factor with an NXP i.MX8M Mini SoC. Other Mini-based SBCs include Seco’s SBC-C61, Boardcon’s sandwich-style EM-IMX8M-MINI, and Garz & Fricke’s recent Tanaro, among others.

Ubuntu: Xubuntu 20.04 Beta Run Through, Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Security Fixes and Plymouth

  • Xubuntu 20.04 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Xubuntu 20.04 Beta. Enjoy!

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 625

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 625 for the week of March 29 – April 4, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Canonical Outs New Kernel Security Updates for Ubuntu to Fix 4 Flaws

    Canonical has released today new Linux kernel security updates for all supported Ubuntu releases to address a total of four security vulnerabilities discovered by various researchers. Affecting all supported Ubuntu releases and kernels, a flaw (CVE-2020-8428) discovered by Al Viro in Linux kernel’s VFS (Virtual Filesystem Switch) layer, which could allow a local attacker to crash the system or expose sensitive information, was patched in this update. On top of that, the new Linux kernel security update also fixes a vulnerability (CVE-2019-19046) discovered in the IPMI message handler implementation, which could allow a local attacker to cause a denial of service (kernel memory exhaustion). This flaw affects only Ubuntu 19.10 and Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS systems running Linux kernel 5.3.

  • Canonical Contributing Upstream Improvements To Plymouth Ahead Of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

    One of the immediate differences Ubuntu 20.04 desktop/laptop users will notice when booting in UEFI mode is the boot splash screen improvements thanks to leveraging Red Hat's work on providing a flicker-free boot experience and pulling in the UEFI BGRT system/motherboard logo during the boot process to provide a more transitive experience. Canonical in turn is working on pushing some of their improvements back into upstream Plymouth. The Ubuntu 20.04 LTS boot experience is on-par to what has been found in Fedora and other Linux distributions like Arch Linux for over one year.