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KDE

KDE 3.5.1: Just Around the Bend

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KDE
-s

KDE 3.5.1 isn't released. But it's been tagged, which means an announcement may be in our near future. I svn'd the sources and built them over this past weekend and thought I'd give fans a bit of a sneak peak.

KDE flaws put Linux, Unix systems at risk

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KDE

A serious vulnerability has been found in the popular KDE open-source software bundle. The flaw, deemed "critical" by the research outfit the French Security Incident Response Team, could allow a remote attacker to gain control over vulnerable systems.

Exploring natural media graphics with Krita

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KDE

Traditionally, graphics applications have been divided into raster image and vector image editors, based on the primitives that each category uses. By that logic, the open source world needs only one of each, or it gets accused of wasting "resources" through duplication. But there's another way to look at graphics applications -- by usage. The painting program Krita takes a different approach to working with pixels, which can lead to a very different raster imaging experience.

People Behind KDE: Görkem Çetin

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KDE

Tonight's interview on People Behind KDE is with one of the heros of KDE localisation. For KDE 4 he plans to get 100% Turkish support.

Osnabrueck IV Meeting Brings "Akonadi" PIM Data Storage Service

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KDE

For the fourth consecutive year a group of KDE PIM developers followed the gracious invitation of Intevation GmbH to meet at their headquarters in Osnabrück, Germany on the first weekend in January. As in the past years, the face-time proved very productive especially since everyone felt that with KDE 4 the time for more fundamental changes has come.

Formation of the KDE Technical Working Group in Progress

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KDE

The first Technical Working Group for KDE is now being formed, with elections due over the next few weeks. The Group will help the hundreds of KDE contributors come to technical decisions and smooth processes such as major releases. It will also provide technical guidance to KDE contributors.

Previewing KDE 4

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KDE

Recently at a Linux show, John Littler saw a preview of a new version of KDE running on a KDE developer's laptop. The interface looked cleaner than before, and apparently there was a whole raft of new stuff under the hood. John recently interviewed KDE developer Aaron J. Seigo about the forthcoming KDE 4 (due in the fall) and also a little about the recent controversy surrounding the porting of KDE to operating systems other than Linux.

Aaron Seigo to Speak at SCALE 4x

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KDE

Aaron Seigo will be presenting at SCALE 4x, the 2006 Southern California Linux Expo on February 11-12 in Los Angeles. His presentation will cover the next KDE release and how the Plasma project is looking.

Join the KDE Developers at FOSDEM 2006

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KDE

FOSDEM, the sixth Free and Open source Software Developers' European Meeting will be held on 25 and 26 February 2006 in Brussels. KDE will be present there to socialise, hack and take part in the wider Free Software community.

Solid: More dynamic flexibility for KDE 4

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KDE

With Solid the coming Version 4 of the Linux desktop KDE is to be made more flexible when it comes to allowing network connections to be switched or hardware to be changed.

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