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This week in KDE: New features galore!

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KDE

Tons and tons of awesome new features and UI polish landed this week, alongside an equally weighty ton of important bugfixes.

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KDE Plasma Review: The Swiss Army Knife of Desktops

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KDE
Reviews

As the long-standing rival to GNOME, KDE Plasma is another one of the most popular Linux desktop environments. It’s a lot of the things people may not like about GNOME: resource efficient, unbelievably customizable, and as minimal or complex as you want it to be. This KDE Plasma review will cover performance, user interface, customization, and recommendations on how to use and who should use KDE Plasma.

[...]

As great as the defaults are, the strength of KDE lies in its customizability. It’s “have it your way” to the extreme.

If you don’t like the default Breeze theme, it’s very easy to change it with the “Global Theme” application. You can choose from any that come preinstalled, or you can choose to go out and download more to suit your needs. The customization options are all about choice, and you can easily customize it to any look you want.

Under System Settings, you can change almost every single aspect of the system, including global themes, window themes, icon themes, and more. You can make Plasma look like the following.

[...]

The beauty of all the customization Plasma offers is that everybody can use Plasma. It starts out spartan-simple, but you can change it to suit any workflow or appearance you want. You can make a very resource-efficient Windows or macOS clone. Additionally, those looking to try out Wayland without using GNOME should try out Plasma. It’s the only other full Desktop Environment that supports Wayland (with the addition of some other packages), and it’s a great place to test and experience Wayland on your system.

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KDE’s July 2020 Apps Update Improves KTorrent, KMyMoney, KDiff3, and Others

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KDE

KDE Applications 20.04.3 is now available as the third and last point release to the latest KDE Applications 20.04 series. It brings various improvements to some of the most popular KDE apps, including the KTorrent BitTorrent client, KMyMoney personal finance manager, and KDiff3 file comparison tool.

KTorrent 5.2.0 enables faster downloads of your torrents due to the improvements made to the Distributed Hash Table (DHT) functionality. On the other hand, KMyMoney 5.1.0 adds support for the Indian Rupee symbol ₹, the ability to view all account types in the Budget view, as well as a new “Reverse charges and payments” option to OFX imports.

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Direct: KDE's July 2020 Apps Update

Qt Creator 4.12.4 released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.12.4 !

In this release of Qt Creator we fixed C++ debugging on iOS devices, and adapted MCU support to the new Qt for MCU 1.3 release. Have a look at our change log for a more complete list of improvements.

The opensource version is available on the Qt download page under "Qt Creator", and you find commercially licensed packages on the Qt Account Portal. Qt Creator 4.12.4 is also available as an update in the online installer. Please post issues in our bug tracker. You can also find us on IRC on #qt-creator on chat.freenode.net, and on the Qt Creator mailing list.

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KDE Plasma 5.19.3 Desktop Environment Arrives with More Than 30 Changes

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KDE

Packed with more than 30 changes, the KDE Plasma 5.19.3 update is here to make the logout action in the Lock/Logout widget work again, improve the deletion of multiple application shortcuts in the new Global Shortcuts page, and fix a very annoying bug affecting scrolling in a GTK app, which stopped working when a Plasma notification appears.

Moreover, GNOME’s Nautilus file manager is now listed in the Default Applications page under System Settings when it’s installed, and the System Settings no longer crashes when there are no file managers installed and you open the Applications page.

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Direct: Plasma 5.19.3

24 Excellent KDE Plasma Widgets (Updated 2020)

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KDE

After desktop hopping for many years, I’m fairly settled on KDE Plasma 5. It’s a lightweight (yes these days it really is lightweight) and responsive desktop which is full-featured and beguiling to the eye. In my opinion, one of the aspects that stands KDE Plasma head and shoulders above its desktop peers is extensibility. Plasma lets you configure the desktop to your specific preferences.

KDE Plasma widgets (also known as plasmoids) are a smart way of customizing the desktop. There’s an abundance of widgets available that act like building blocks, constructing a desktop that’s perfect for your needs and requirements. I’ve tried the vast majority of KDE Plasma widgets.

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Also: Week #5 Status Report [Preset Editor MyPaint Engine]

This week in KDE: A little bit of everything

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KDE

A lot of exciting things are happening behind the scenes these days, but in terms of what landed this week, we focused on bugfixing–including a few nice high DPI fixes–and also got a few nice Dolphin and Konsole features.

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KSnip and Spectacle

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KDE
Software

Switching back-and-forth between the tabs gives me a “pixels moved” sense, and that’s really useful. KSnip’s wide selection of annotation tools – it’s nearly a specialized drawing application – helps, too: I tell people to draw big red arrows on screenshots pointing to problems (because describing things is difficult, and a glaring visual glitch to you may be totally invisible to me).

With KSnip, adding detail to a screenshot is child’s play.

That’s not to say that KSnip doesn’t have its issues. But a blog post is not a place to complaing about someone else’s Free Software: the issue tracker is (with constructive bug reports, not complaints).

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Also: Third alpha release of my project

Bringing modern process management to the desktop

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KDE
Software

A desktop environment's sole role is to connect users to their applications. This includes everything from launching apps to actually displaying apps but also managing them and making sure they run fairly. Everyone is familiar the concept of a "Task manager" (like ksysguard), but over time they haven't kept up with the way applications are being developed or the latest developments from Linux.

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KDE and GNOME: Plasma 5.19 in Groovy Gorilla, GSoC and Fractal

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KDE
GNOME
  • Plasma 5.19 testing in Groovy Gorilla

    Are you running the development release of Kubuntu Groovy Gorilla 20.10, or wanting to try the daily live ISO?

    Plasma 5.19 has now landed in 20.10 and is available for testing. You can read about the new features and improvements in Plasma 5.19 in the official KDE release announcement.

  • GSoC Review 1 - Qt3D based backend for KStars

    In the fourth week of GSoC, I worked on adding support for Skybox which supports the projection modes implemented last week. I also added the grid implementation in KStars based on the prototype.

  • GSoC ’ 20 Progress: Week 3 and 4

    The past two weeks did not see as much progress as I would have liked because of my university exams and evaluations. Now, let’s focus on the work that I could do before I got swamped with the academic work and term exams.

    I started the third week by working on drafting a basic QML display of the subtitle model items, like the position of the subtitles in the timeline. I drafted a basic delegate QML model to display the start positions of each subtitle line. Then I began working on integrating the back-end part (which I had mentioned in the previous post) with the basic front-end part (displaying the position of the subtitles).

    In this process of integrating the subtitle model with the QML delegate model, I encountered a few logical errors with my code and some connections with the Subtitle Model which I had completely overlooked. It was also during this time that I realised I had missed out some key functions while writing the subtitle model class.

  • Google Summer of Code 2020 – week 4 and 5

    Hi, today I will talk about my week 4 and week 5 and bring some news!

    The last post was short but this one will make up for it, explaining some important bits, and changes, in the structure of mark that changed/improved during the first month of coding in GSoC.

    In week 4, I documented a huge part of the existing code, although there is still a need for some updates. Currently in week 5, I am fixing some bugs of the new logic and I will document the newly created Painter class (more information below), also start developing the logic for text annotation.

  • Fractal: Refactoring and the review process

    In this year GSoC, Alejandro is working on Fractal, moving code from the backend to the client, to try to simplify the code used to communicate with the matrix.org server and maybe in the future we can replace fractal-matrix-api with the matrix-rust-sdk. And then we'll have less code in our project to maintain.

    This is a great work, something needed in a project with a technological debt of several years. I created this project to learn Rust, and also I was learning about the matrix protocol during the project build. And other contributors do the same. So we've been building one thing on top another for a lot of years.

    In this kind of community driven projects it's the way to go. For some time we've people interested and developers think about the design and start change some parts or to write new functionality following a new design pattern. But voluntary developers motivation change in time and they left the project and the next one continues the work with a different vision.

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Kubuntu Linux 20.04 for a digital painting workstation: Reasons and Install guide.

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The GNU C Library version 2.32 is now available

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Identifying Operating Systems in GNOME Boxes

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