Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KDE

This week in KDE: The user interface improvements you’ve always wanted

Filed under
KDE

This week the new Plasma System Monitor app had its first independent release! This app is a future replacement for the current KSysGuard monitoring app, and features a radically better user interface, an overview page with “just the facts”, simpler and more powerful customizability, and an easy to understand “Applications” page that shows individual apps rather than processes.

Read more

Ktown becomes Vtown

Filed under
KDE
Slack

So it is finally happening.
On US Election Day 2020, Pat Volkerding added “vtown” into the ‘testing’ directory of Slackware-current.

The “vtown” in Slackware is essentially my ‘ktown’ repository containing KDE Plasma5 plus its dependencies, with a few exceptions, a number of my packages removed, some caveats and a couple of renamed packages.

A lot of useful information from early adopters can already be found on linuxquestions.org in the dedicated thread about vtown.

One of the benefits of this testing version of Plasma5 in Slackware is the merging of several Slackware and ktown packages.
Mostly because I needed to provide Qt5-supporting versions of existing Slackware packages, I needed different names for the ‘ktown’ versions that I was going to provide. I could not risk that people would end up with old Slackware Qt4 based packages which would break Plasma5.
So to avoid clashing with packages like “plasma-nm”, “attica”, “baloo”, “kscreen” etc… I had to use alternative package names like “plasma5-nm”, “attica-framework”, “baloo5”, “kscreen2” and several (actually, many) more.
Here is the full list of my packages that got merged back into packages with the original Slackware names...

Read more

KDE’s November 2020 Apps Update Brings Improvements to Konsole, RKWard, and More

Filed under
KDE

The biggest news is that the official kde.org/applications app store has a new home over at apps.kde.org, which not only is easier to remember but also easier to browse in other languages. If you’re new to KDE and you want to see what apps it includes, check out this unified place for browsing all of KDE’s apps.

And now for the updates, as KDE’s November 2020 Apps update (a.k.a. KDE Applications 20.08.3) introduces the latest Krita 4.4 release with its many new features and improvements, KDE Partition Manager 4.2 with improved /etc/fstab handling and support for partitions containing unknown file systems and mount points, and RKWard 0.7.2 IDE/GUI for R with lots of awesome changes.

Read more

Introducing User Feedback in Dolphin

Filed under
KDE

I’m happy to announce that the next version of Dolphin will introduce support for reporting of some telemetry data to the KDE servers. It’s important to stress the the data will be submitted only if the user actively enables the feature from the Dolphin settings.

Telemetry data can be very helpful to developers, but it may seem uninteresting to an end user. My personal opinion is that enabling telemetry is actually one of the easieast ways to contribute to KDE, if not the easieast. You just need to enable the reporting and you go on with your usual workflow.

Dolphin relies on the KUserFeedback framework to submit the data, which is already used by other projects such as Plasma or Kate.

Read more

Plasma System Monitor Preview Release

Filed under
KDE

Plasma System Monitor is a brand new UI for monitoring system resources. It is built on top of Kirigami and a new system statistics service called "KSystemStats" that was debuted in Plasma 5.19. It shares a lot of code with the new system monitor applets that were also introduced in Plasma 5.19. It is meant to be a successor to KSysGuard.

Read more

What is new in Qt Quick 3D 6.0

Filed under
KDE

It has been awhile since I've posted any updates regarding Qt Quick 3D, but not because there has been no progress. In fact quite the opposite: my team and I have been so busy getting Qt Quick 3D ready for 6.0 we haven't had time to talk about all the cool new features we have added. So today I would like to talk about some of the things we have done so far.

Read more

Interview with Tansy Branscombe

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

I found out about Krita after doing some research online about the different free art tools available online. There were lots of options, but the name Krita came up quite often and seemed to get good reviews, so I thought it was worth trying!

I love that Krita really feels like it was built with art & artists in mind. One of my favourite features is having the reference images pinned around my work without having them cluttering up my layers. I also love that the programme seems quite streamlined so it starts up pretty quickly and never gets too slow even though my laptop doesn’t have a dedicated graphics card.

Read more

TDE R14.0.9 release is here!

Filed under
KDE

The Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE) development team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of TDE R14.0.9. Albeit being a maintenance release, this version brings along a bunch of new applications to expand the offer of the TDE desktop and provide a more modern look.

TDE is a complete software desktop environment designed for Unix-like operating systems, intended for computer users preferring a traditional desktop model, and is free/libre software. Born as a fork of KDE 3.5 back in 2010, TDE is now a fully independent project with its own personality and development team, available for various Linux distros, BSD and DilOS.

Read more

Also: Trinity Desktop 14.0.9 Is The Latest For This Decade-Old KDE 3.5 Fork - Phoronix

Nitrux 1.3.4 is available to download

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

We are pleased to announce the launch of Nitrux 1.3.4. This new version brings together the latest software updates, bug fixes, performance improvements, and ready-to-use hardware support.

Nitrux 1.3.4 is available for immediate download.

Read more

Kubuntu 20.04 with KDE Legacy Oxygen Theme

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

As I posted last year, KDE 4 is my favorite. Surprisingly, Kubuntu 20.04 brings the legacy Oxygen theme built-in. Thanks to Gemlog on social media, I discovered it. Now I bring you how I do it.

Results first! There are my Kubuntu Focal machine with the legendary Oxygen theme I loved so much. It is amazing I can still enjoy this look and feel once again after eight years.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Devices: Allwinner, Yocto, Arduino

  • Allwinner H6 SBC offers dual Ethernet, four display outputs, M.2 expansion

    While the processor was introduced in 2017, there are only a few Allwinner H6 SBC’s on the market with, for instance, Orange Pi 3 or Pine H64 boards, and it never became as popular as solutions based Allwinner H3 processor. But Boardcon has now launched its own Allwinner H6 SBC targeting professionals with Boardcon EMH6 board combining a carrier board and a computer-on-module that can be integrated into products.

  • Automotive Grade Linux Releases UCB 10 Software Platform with Yocto Long Term Support

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), an open source project developing a shared software platform for in-vehicle technology, today announced the latest code release of the AGL platform, UCB 10, also known under the codename "Jumping Jellyfish." Developed through a joint effort by dozens of member companies, the AGL Unified Code Base (UCB) is an open source software platform that can serve as the de facto industry standard for infotainment, telematics and instrument cluster applications.

  • Arduino Blog » These cornhole boards react to your bean bag tosses

    The lawn game of cornhole has seen a surge in popularity over the last couple of decades. But if you’ve ever thought about raising its cool factor, then YouTuber Hardware Unknown has just what you’ve been waiting for: light and audio effects that react to your throws. Hardware Unknown’s foldable boards each feature an Arduino Nano for control. A vibration sensor is used to tell when a bean bag hits the board, and an IR break-beam setup senses when one goes into the hole.

The Best 21 Open-source Headless CMS for 2020

A headless CMS (content management system) is a backend system which works the content available through API (RESTful API or GraphQL). It's built to give the developers the possibilities to create what they want. The API-driven headless approach is trending right now especially for enterprise users and developers. Headless CMS programs can be used as a backend for mobile apps, static generated websites with frameworks like Next, Nuxt, Gridsome and Hugo which also supports server-side rendering. They can be also used to manage IoT (Internet of Things) applications. Read more Also: 17 Best Open-source Self-hosted Commenting Systems

Secuity Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (spip and webkit2gtk), Fedora (kernel and libexif), openSUSE (chromium and rclone), Slackware (mutt), SUSE (kernel, mariadb, and slurm), and Ubuntu (igraph).

  • Top Tips to Protect Your Linux System

    Linux-based operating systems have a reputation for their high-security level. That's one of the reasons why the market share for Linux has been growing. The most commonly used operating systems such as Windows are often affected by targeted attacks in the form of ransomware infections, spyware, as well as worms, and malware. As a result, many personal, as well as enterprise users, are turning to Linux-based operating systems such as the Ubuntu-based Linux OS for security purposes. While Linux based systems are not targeted as frequently as other popular operating systems, they are not completely foolproof. There are plenty of risks and vulnerabilities for all types of Linux devices which put your privacy as well as your identity at risk.

  • Building a healthy relationship between security and sysadmins | Enable Sysadmin

    Learn how to bridge the gap between operations/development and security.

today's howtos