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GSoC Work on Krita

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KDE
  • Week 2: GSoC Project Report

    This week I worked on making the UI interactive and configuring the interaction between the comment model and the storyboard model. I also implemented the switching of modes.

    The comment model stores the name and visibility of comment fields. It is responsible for the comments menu’s items. Storyboard model’s items have fields to store the contents of each comment field. So whenever a comment is added to the comment model we need to add a child to each storyboard item. Similarly with removing and moving (reordering) of comment items. I connected signals for removing, adding and moving items from the comment model to storyboard model. This signals were used to perform the required actions. Remove and add signals were easy, but qt does not use the moveRows(..) function for drag and drop. Instead it inserts the row to be moved in the desired place and deletes the row. So basically the moving is faked. This results in rowsAdded, dataChanged and rowsRemoved signals. To get the rowsMoved signal I had to reimplement the mimeData and dropMimeData and call moveRows explicitly. Also we must return false in the dropMimeData function otherwise the row at previous position will be deleted as qt assumes the default actions are being followed.

  • Hello once again!

    First of all, sorry for not making a blog post early on during the community bonding period. I couldn't because I was mostly busy with Krita's Android release.

    Secondly, some of you might remember me from the previous year. I was GSoC student for Krita. Now it is my second time! Smile

  • The MyPaint Brush Engine is now working

    It has been more than 2 weeks since the coding period began and I didn't post much because the project was just begun and there was no big progress. Coming to the project, the MyPaint brush engine plugin has been integrated into Krita and is working. Though, it is very rudimentary as of now, we can't customize it, we can't load/save brushes and there is no settings widget. All we can do as of now is just use the default settings for painting. The rest of the things will be taken care of during this summer.

KDE Plasma 5.19.1 Desktop Arrives as First Point Release, 30 Bug Fixes Included

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KDE
Security

KDE Plasma 5.19.1 is here just one week after the launch of the KDE Plasma 5.19 desktop environment series, which brought more polished features, consistency changes, and improved usability.

As expected from a first point release, KDE Plasma 5.19.1 includes only bug fixes. These address various important issues reported by users, such as the battery applet not being displayed in the system tray area or the Bluedevil applet tooltip displaying the wrong name for connected devices.

Moreover, OpenVPN support was improved in the Plasma NetworkManager (plasma-nm) applet to avoid enabling TCP if the remote has been set on another line, the former default action of the Plasma Vault applet has been restored, and KRunner KCM now opens in System Settings.

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Direct: Plasma 5.19.1

KDE Applications Release Meta-data

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KDE

kde.org/applications now has latest release versions and dates on it. Finally you can check your app store or distro is up to date

This was added to the website by elite new contributor David Barchiesi and there’s been a year of faff in the background getting it added to the release process in various places, but if apps are missing it then talk to the app maintainers to get it added.

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Interview with Albert Weand

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KDE
Interviews

A couple of years ago, I started to gain interest in GNU/Linux and even considered using it as my main OS. One of my priorities was to find a good painting application compatible with the system. I tried MyPaint and Gimp, but Krita was definitely the best option.

I really like the user interface, it’s very flexible. I like to keep things simple and just focus on the artwork. The shortcuts to navigate around the canvas are great, they feel very natural. There’s no need to change tools in order to zoom in, zoom out or move around the canvas. I also like the default brushes, they feel organic and the textures help to simulate real brushes in traditional painting.

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KDE Plasma 5.20 Bringing this Stunning Taskbar Feature in Next Release

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KDE

KDE Plasma 5.20 which is scheduled to be released later this year, just announced a new taskbar feature for this gorgeous desktop.
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Top 10 reasons to use KDE as your Desktop Environment

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KDE

If you are a big fan of Linux desktop environments, you must have seen how rough the journey has been for KDE desktop 4.x iteration. Upon launch in 2008, KDE 4 came with a lot of issues. From bugs, low quality features to poor performance. Were it not for the improvements and minor releases, KDE desktop would have slowly faded away into the books of history.

From early releases to the current version 4.5, KDE Desktop has risen to become one of the most fantastic Linux desktop environments. Take a look at the Top 10 reasons why you should use KDE as your Desktop Environment.

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digiKam 7.0.0-rc is released

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KDE

Just few words to inform the community that 7.0.0 release candidate is out and ready to test two month later the third beta release published in April.

After a Covid-19 containement stage at home, this new version come with more than 740 bug-fixes since last stable release 6.4.0 and look very promising. We are in finalisation stage now to be ready to publish the 7.0.0 final final release while this summer.

A good new is the availablity of digiKam in official FlatPak repositories to help end-users to install quickly the application under a compatible Linux systems.

Thanks to all users for your support and donations, and to all contributors, students, testers who allowed us to improve this release.

digiKam 7.0.0 source code tarball, Linux 32/64 bits AppImage bundles, MacOS package and Windows 32/64 bits installers can be downloaded from this repository. Don’t forget to not use this beta in production yet and thanks in advance for your feedback in Bugzilla.

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KMyMoney 5.1.0 released

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KDE

The KMyMoney development team today announces the immediate availability of version 5.1.0 of its open source Personal Finance Manager.

With additional development manpower we were able to tackle a lot of issues and will continue to do so in the upcoming time. If you think you can support the project with some code changes or your artistic or writing talent, please take a look at the some low hanging fruits at the KMyMoney junior job list. Any contribution is welcome.

Despite the ongoing permanent testing we understand that some bugs may have slipped past our best efforts. If you find one of them, please forgive us, and be sure to report it, either to the mailing list or on bugs.kde.org.

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KDE and GNOME Leftovers

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KDE
GNOME
  • OSM Indoor Maps for KDE Itinerary

    In the previous post I briefly mentioned ongoing work about adding interactive train station and airport maps to KDE Itinerary. Here are some more details on what this is about.

  • Cantor in GSoC 2020

    KDE is once again taking part in Google Summer of Code program and this time Cantor has 2 internships working to improve the software and bringing new features. Both projects are supervised by Alexander Semke and Stefan Gerlach.

    Nikita Sirgienko is polishing usability and developing several small features present in other mathematical REPL applications to improve the user experience in Cantor. In his words, “the idea of this project is not to implement one single and big “killer feature” but to address several smaller and bigger open and outstanding topics in Cantor”.

  • Calamares default branch

    There’s plenty of definitions for the word “master” – my Oxford English Dictionary lists over thirty – and most of them are unproblematic. That is, they do what they say on the tin. There’s also a meaning connected to slavery. Slavery is an evil that I’m glad is partly destroyed from the world, sad that it is only partly destroyed; like smallpox, it should be gone.

    We can talk about things that do not exist, and things that should not exist, and things that exist metaphorically. But we should be – when I say “we should be” I mean “I personally pledge to do”, as well as meaning “this is a moral imperative to all of us” – we should be careful to use words with the right etyomological, historical, and metaphorical baggage.

    I don’t want to use the word “master” with a meaning connected to slavery, unless it’s speaking specifically about slavery, the evil that it is, and its abolition.

    [...]

    I checked: Calamares doesn’t deal with this level of detail, so this is a cheap commitment from me.

    But today I learned something new, about the history of the naming of git branches. Brendan O’Leary has a good write-up, though I found that from following Reginald Braithwaite. Brendan describes the history of, and the metaphorical baggage of, git’s “master” branch.

  • Community Engagement Challenge

    I think I speak for many when I say that each one of us in the FOSS world loves opportunities that give rewards and compensation for working on FOSS projects. And, it’s even better when these opportunities have little technical or conditional restraints.

    That’s why I’m excited for the inaugural GNOME Foundation 2020 Community Engagement Challenge which is a rare opportunity to participate in a FOSS contest and win prizes along the way (special thanks to Endless for the grant that supports this Challenge!)

    The GNOME foundation is giving you an exciting new opportunity to apply your creativity, ideas, and skills to help grow the FOSS community by submitting an idea which engages beginning coders with the free and open-source software (FOSS) community. Even better, selected ideas can win up to 21,000$ in cash and prizes along the way, including sponsorship to a future GUADEC and much support from the GNOME Community.

This Week in KDE: Plasma 5.20 features start landing

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KDE

In addition to a ton of bugfixes for Plasma 5.19 which we just released, this week we started to land big improvements for Plasma 5.20.

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Also: KDE Developers Begin Working More On Plasma 5.20 Changes

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