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Qt and KDE Development

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Development
KDE
  • New Qt Releases Might Now Be Restricted To Paying Customers For 12 Months

    With an apparent blame on the novel coronavirus, The Qt Company is said to be considering restricting new Qt releases to paying customers for a period of twelve months in an effort to boost their near-term finances.

    Earlier today The Qt Company published a 2020 Qt road-map while following that a Phoronix reader tipped us off to the latest discussions between KDE, the Qt project, and The Qt Company.

    KDE and the open-source Qt folks have been in discussions with The Qt Company especially with the restrictions announced back in January by The Qt Company that LTS point releases might only be available to commercial customers, Qt Accounts being needed for binary package downloads, etc.

  • Qt, Open Source and corona
    Dear KDE community,
    
    the relationship between the KDE community, the Qt project and The Qt Company 
    has always been close and beneficial for all three.
    
    * The Qt Company benefits from having a large and healthy community of 
    contributors, developers and experts around their product.
    * KDE benefits from being able to use Qt and to contribute directly to Qt.
    * The Qt project benefits from having the company as a steward and very large 
    contributor, and having KDE as a large and well-known sub-community.
    
    Last December, I published a document explaining the win-win-win-relationship: 
    http://www.olafsw.de/a-better-qt-because-of-open-source-and-kde/
    
    
    Unfortunately, The Qt Company is currently considering to stop this healthy 
    cooperation.
    
    Fortunately, the KDE Free Qt Foundation exists, which secures the continued 
    existence of Open Source Qt:
    https://kde.org/community/whatiskde/kdefreeqtfoundation.php
    Together with Martin Konold, I represent KDE in the board of the foundation.
    
    
    I will now give you a bit of background information.
    
    During the past two years, there have been negotiations between The Qt Company 
    and the KDE Free Qt Foundation for updating the contract.
    
    Our goals in negotiations:
    * helping the company increase their revenue without harming the Qt project or 
    the KDE community
    * strengthening the protection of the Qt project and of the KDE community
    * avoiding a parting of ways between The Qt Company and the Qt+KDE communities
    
    Concrete areas included in the negotiations are:
    
    * Fixing the incompatibility between paid Qt license terms and using or 
    contributing to Open Source
    (“Prohibited Combination” in https://www.qt.io/terms-conditions/ )
    * Fixing the license incompatibility between the Qt Design Studio (which is 
    only partly Free Software) and our existing contract with the company
    * Making our contract with the company stronger, requiring them to make 
    immediate Free Software releases of Qt (currently, they are allowed to delay 
    by 12 months) to ensure the availability of LTS security fixes for KDE
    * Updating our contract to include Wayland
    * Evaluating contract changes suggested by the company aimed at making the Qt 
    business more profitable, for example the option of selling bundles of Qt with 
    other software, or making integrations with proprietary third-party software 
    possible
    
    
    One setback in the negotiations has been an announcement of The Qt Company in 
    January: https://www.qt.io/blog/qt-offering-changes-2020
    They announced that LTS releases of Qt will only be available for paid license 
    holders. It is still unclear what this implies for contributions to Qt and for 
    the sharing of security fixes between the various parties (including The Qt 
    Company, the many Qt experts contributing, the KDE community, and Linux 
    distributions).
    
    At an in-person meeting in Frankfurt on March 6, we nevertheless managed to 
    lay the groundwork for a possible path forward, continuing with an approach 
    beneficial to all sides.
    
    
    But last week, the company suddenly informed both the KDE e.V. board and the 
    KDE Free QT Foundation that the economic outlook caused by the Corona virus 
    puts more pressure on them to increase short-term revenue. As a result, they 
    are thinking about restricting ALL Qt releases to paid license holders for the 
    first 12 months. They are aware that this would mean the end of contributions 
    via Open Governance in practice.
    
    Obviously, it cannot be in the middle- and long-term health of The Qt Company 
    to separate itself from the very strong Qt + KDE communities.
    
    We hope The Qt Company will reconsider. However, this threat to the Open 
    Source community needs to be anticipated, so that the Qt and KDE communities 
    can prepare themselves.
    
    The Qt Company says that they are willing to reconsider the approach only if 
    we offer them concessions in other areas. I am reminded, however, of the 
    situation half a year ago. We had discussed an approach for contract updates, 
    which they suddenly threw away by restricting LTS releases of Qt instead.
    
    
    What does this mean for the future of Qt and for the future of KDE?
    
    All software changes in Qt will still be available at as Open Source as 
    required by our contract – maybe with a delay of 12 months if the company 
    decides to part ways with the communities.
    
    We will continue to work on a contract update that helps all sides. But even 
    if these negotiations were to be unilaterally stopped by The Qt Company, Qt 
    will stay Open Source, and KDE will be able to use it. I am also absolutely 
    sure that the Qt + KDE communities will continue cooperation on new features, 
    bug fixes, and security fixes, even should The Qt Company decide to forgo the 
    benefits of cooperation.
    
    I invite The Qt Company to stay with us. It will be worthwhile.
    
    
    Best regards,
    
    Olaf
    
    
  • Learn PyQt: Packaging PyQt5 & PySide2 applications for Windows, with PyInstaller

    There is not much fun in creating your own desktop applications if you can't share them with other people — whether than means publishing it commercially, sharing it online or just giving it to someone you know. Sharing your apps allows other people to benefit from your hard work!

    The good news is there are tools available to help you do just that with your Python applications which work well with apps built using Qt5. In this tutorial we'll look at the most popular tool for packaging Python applications: PyInstaller.

    This tutorial is broken down into a series of steps, using PyInstaller to build first simple, and then increasingly complex PyQt5 applications into distributable EXE files on Windows. You can choose to follow it through completely, or skip ahead to the examples that are most relevant to your own project.

  • Virtual KDE PIM Sprint April 2020

    Last weekend would have been the traditional annual KDE PIM meeting in Toulouse, but with travel being largely shut down in Europe we had to do this virtually. That meant missing out on the culinary treats of being in France, but we got a few things done nevertheless.

    [...]

    Nico has been working on this, eventually enabling platform calendar abstraction behind the KCalendarCore API. So the same application code could be using a calendar from Akonadi on a desktop system and the Android calendar on a phone.

    We hopefully managed to sort out the remaining conceptual questions for this (modeling hierarchies, lazy population of expensive calendars, separate classes for the calendar metadata or not).

    Moving PIM modules to KDE Frameworks

    KDAV is nearing completion for transitioning to Frameworks after the 20.04 release (so in May or June). A final review pass resulted in a few more improvements and API cleanups.

    Following KDAV the possible candidates are the KGAPI library, which is already used externally and thus would benefit most, as well as the various email frameworks (MIME, IMAP, SMTP).

Qt 5.12.8 Released

Filed under
KDE

I am happy to inform you we have released Ot 5.12.8 today.

As earlier informed Qt 5.12 LTS is in 'strict' phase and so on it will receive only the most important bug fixes. But still this 8th patch release to Qt 5.12 LTS contains ~150 changes including fixes to more than 30 bugs. Please check most important changes from Qt 5.12.8 Changes Files.

Qt 5.12.8 can be updated to existing online installation by using maintenance tool. For new installations, please download latest online installer from Qt Account portal or from qt.io Download page. Offline packages are available for commercial users in the Qt Account portal and at the qt.io Download page for open-source users. You can also try out the Commercial evaluation option from the qt.io Download page.

Read more

Also: The Qt Company Publishes A 2020 Roadmap Culminating With The Qt 6.0 Release

Maui Weekly Report

Filed under
Development
KDE

There has been a lot of work into the Maui Project, and the Nitrux team has been actively working on the apps, the framework, and the libraries to make the convergence experience something unique and reliable for our first stable release. Since last time we posted something about the project, many things are refactored, a lot of improvements and UI/UX paper-cut fixes are introduced, and new platforms now have support. We were present at the Plasma Mobile sprint at Berlin, working on improving the Maui apps experience for such a platform. In the sprint, the UBPorts developers were also present, and we are looking forward to seeing the Maui Apps in their platform.

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Qt Creator 4.12 RC released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.12 RC!

For an overview of the improvements in Qt Creator 4.12, please head over to the first Beta blog post.

Get Qt Creator 4.12 RC
The opensource version is available on the Qt download page under "Pre-releases", and you find commercially licensed packages on the Qt Account Portal. Qt Creator 4.12 RC is also available under Preview > Qt Creator 4.12.0-rc1 in the online installer. Please post issues in our bug tracker. You can also find us on IRC on #qt-creator on chat.freenode.net, and on the Qt Creator mailing list.

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Interview with Philipp Urlich

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

Since I was not keen on using Photoshop for painting (even though I worked for many years with Photoshop), I was looking for alternatives. Then I finally found Krita in 2018.

I love that it’s open source. It has many great tools for various tasks. The ability to create your own powerful brushes. I also love that you can do animations.

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Nate Graham on Latest KDE Improvements

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KDE

  • This week in KDE: Moar performance!

    Some very nice performance fixes landed this week, which should substantially boost move and copy speeds for local transfers and transfers to and from Samba shares in particular. But that’s not all, and there’s more on the menu…

  • KDE Starts April With Big Performance Jump For Local I/O + 50~95% Faster Samba Transfers

    KDE developers managed to squeeze some long-problematic I/O optimizations into the KDE code-base this week along with other enhancements to make for a nice first week of April.

    The performance work for kicking off April includes:

    - 50~95% faster transferring of large files to/from Samba shares. This big speed-up is a Dolphin improvement for a 2012 bug report. This fast-copy support for the Samba code should now allow "mount-level copy performance" thanks to various architectural changes in the code.

Kaidan 0.5.0 released!

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KDE

After more than half a year the next release is here, but the waiting was worth it! It includes the all new onboarding, which aims at better usability for new XMPP users and improved security, while minimizing additional effort by the user. For further information look at the blog post dedicated to this topic.

And even more! Now recording and sending audio and video is possible with Kaidan, as well as searching for contacts and messages. Additionally, many smaller features and fixes are included in this release. But have a look at the changelog yourself.

We sadly have to inform you that we encountered difficulties building Kaidan for Windows and building the Flatpak as one option to use Kaidan on Linux. But we are already working on fixing it and Kaidan 0.5 will hopefully be available on Windows and as a Flatpak for Linux soon™.

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Elisa Music Player by KDE is Refreshing, But Not There Just Yet

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KDE
Software
Reviews

If you’re someone who still listens to locally stored music, in this day and age of several streaming music services, you deserve a good music player app. I use Google Play Music because it also lets me upload my local music files. Yet, I can never really fully switch over because I just don’t like the silly-looking interface. Google Play Music just has the worst interface of all music streaming services. Thus, I still prefer using a nice, beautiful local music player app more often when I can. As such, I’m always on the lookout. Elisa Music Player was just released by the KDE team and is kind of available for every Windows, openSUSE, and Arch Linux user.

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KDE: Debian's Builds of KDE/Plasma, Krita Report and KDE on Instagram

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KDE
  • Norbert Preining: KDE/Plasma updates for Debian sid/testing

    I have written before about getting updated packages for KDE/Plasma on Debian. In the meantime I have moved all package building to the openSUSE Build Service, thus I am able to provide builds for Debian/testing, both i386 and amd64 architectures.

  • [Krita's] April Development Update

    With near infinite difficulty we managed to release Krita 4.2.9 in the last week of March… So now it’s time to look ahead! All Krita developers work from home anyway, whether they do sponsored work or are volunteers, but it’s quite hard to keep focus these days. Several of us are in quarantine, others are in lock-down — with people in Hong Kong, China, India, Russia, Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, U.S.A, Canada, Mexico and Brazil we live under a wide variety of pandemic responses. The Libre Graphics Meeting in Rennes has been moved to 2021, as has the Krita Developers Sprint that was going to happen right after LGM.

    But life goes on, and we’re on the verge of another edition of Google Summer of Code. Krita has received a bunch of excellent proposals! Let’s keep our fingers crossed for our prospective students!

    And, of course, a lot is happening in Krita’s repository! About two weeks ago we merged the resource management rewrite branch into master. Now, let’s unpack this in what we’ve been doing, and what this means… For the past five years, we’ve been working on rewriting the way Krita handles things like brush presets, brush tip and tags. This turned out to be a huge amount of work, sucking up lots and lots of energy. But in March we felt we could risk merging everything into master so it would get into the development builds.

  • KDE on Instagram

    Instagram is one of those social medium services and is run by everyone’s favourite Facebook. The good side of it is that it’s based on happy pretty pictures rather than angry people (Twitter) or political disinformation (Facebook) but the bad side of that is it is common to feel inferior because you’re not as good looking as the people in the pictures. Well that’s not a problem because everyone using KDE or helping out the community is automatically good looking.

Plasma Mobile: How to help us!

Filed under
KDE

We often get asked: “how long until the 1.0 release?”. Or: “how far away is Plasma Mobile 1.0?”. The usual answer to both these question is “It’ll be ready when it is ready”. But, really, how do we know that it is ready?

Recently some of us prepared a check list of items which we consider necessary before we can declare Plasma Mobile “ready” or at rc1 status.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel: Rust, Language, and Linux Plumbers Conference

  • Linus Torvalds' Initial Comment On Rust Code Prospects Within The Linux Kernel

    Kernel developers appear to be eager to debate the merits of potentially allowing Rust code within the Linux kernel. Linus Torvalds himself has made some initial remarks on the topic ahead of the Linux Plumbers 2020 conference where the matter will be discussed at length. In the mailing list thread when discussing Greg Kroah-Hartman's past comments on the Rust prospects for the kernel, it was mentioned that one of the conditions being sought is that it would effectively be disabled by default until there has been sufficient testing.

  • Linux 5.8 Formally Adds The Inclusive Terminology Guidelines

    Merged overnight into the Linux kernel source tree are the new guidelines concerning the use of "inclusive terminology" for future code. It was just one week ago that the inclusive terminology guidelines for the Linux kernel were first proposed to mixed reaction and have now been merged into the source tree after receiving enough approval of various upstream kernel maintainers. [...] There are around 19.5k mentions of "slave" within the kernel source tree, mostly within the kernel networking code. The string "master" is mentioned some 26.9k times. For "blacklist" are around 888 mentions when checking in the current Git tree. Linux is currently at around 69.3k text files with around 3.54 million lines of code comments and 20.1 million lines of code (along with 3.6 million blank lines).

  • Linux team approves new terminology, bans terms like 'blacklist' and 'slave'

    Linus Torvalds approved on Friday a new and more inclusive terminology for the Linux kernel code and documentation. Going forward, Linux developers have been asked to use new terms for the master/slave and blacklist/whitelist terminologies.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Systems Boot and Security Microconference Accepted into 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Systems Boot and Security Microconference has been accepted into the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference! Computer-system security is an important topic to many. Maintaining data security and system integrity is crucial for businesses and individuals. Computer security is paramount even at system boot up, as firmware attacks can compromise the system before the operating system starts. In order to keep the integrity of the system intact, both the firmware as well as the rest of the system must be vigilant in monitoring and preventing malware intrusion. As a result of last year’s microconference Oracle sent out patches to support Trenchboot in the Linux kernel and in GRUB2. An agreement was also reached on problems with TPM 2.0 Linux sysfs interface.

  • GNU Tools Track Added to Linux Plumbers Conference 2020

    We are pleased to announce that we have added an additional track to LPC 2020: the GNU Tools track. The track will run for the 5 days of the conference.

Programming: GNOME/GTK, GNU C Library, Perl and Python

  • Implementing Gtk based Container-Widget: Part — 2

    This write-up is in continuation of its previous part — setting up basic container functionality. In the past couple of weeks, we moved on from just adding children to actually repositioning them (child widgets of the container, NewWidget) when enough space is not available for all widget to fit in the given width. Though the grid structure is yet to put in place, the widget could be seen taking shape already (look at below gif).

  • This week in GNOME Builder #2

    This week we fixed some specific topics which were planned for the previous cycle. If anyone wants to contribute so see some of our “Builder wishlist” go there: Builder/ThreePointThirtyfive Last time i had forgotten to mention the great work of our translation team which contributed various translations to Builder. Thank you!

  • Synopsys DesignWare ARC HS CPUs Now Supported By GNU C Library

    The Synopsys DesignWare ARC HS is designed for high performance embedded environments with the 32-bit HS5x and 64-bit HS6x series. Synopsys has long offered their own GNU toolchain builds to support the DesignWare ARC hardware on Linux while now the mainline support is in good shape with glibc for the ARCv2 ISA having been mainlined. Though do note it's ARCv2 and not the latest ARCv3 ISA.

  • A FIXIT-dive into an old CPAN module

    Let’s have a thought experiment. Assume there is an Open Source-licensed Perl module published on CPAN that you care about, and that hasn’t had any updates in a very long time - what are your options? In this blog post, I’ll take a dive into this problem, and use the Geo::Postcodes::NO module as an example. As of this writing, the module version is 0.31, and it’s most recent release was in September 2006. [...] Contribution information for the module is missing (or at least, less than expected). The author ARNE has offered his email address, and after a quick search one can find his Github page. He hasn’t published this module there, though. If we are going to contribute with this, then just adding a CONTRIBUTING.md file is a probably a good place to start. If the module you are looking for has the same problem, then check out it’s “How to contribute” page on MetaCPAN (you can find a link to it in the menu there). There’s another issue though – we can’t offer a pull-request! At best we can send a patch(1) file attached to an email. While this is a bit old-school and should still work (assuming the author accepts those), there might be better options available.

  • Chapter 3 - Google Correlate example update

    In Chapter 3 on Page 87, the book refers to the Google Correlate service. However, as of December 2019, the service has been shutdown. Since the chapter requires you to download a CSV formatted data, it is no longer possible. However, you can instead download a version of the data that I had used 5 years back when writing the book from here.

  • A Hundred Days of Code, Day 004 - Class Attributes and Inheritance

    Learnt about Class Attributes and Inheritance, today.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxxv) stackoverflow python report

May/June in KDE PIM

Following Dan here’s the summary of what happened around KDE PIM in the last two months. While the focus was mainly on the 20.04.x maintenance releases and KDE’s source code hosting and review systems migrated to a Gitlab instance during that time, development continued at full steam with more than 1,800 changes by 34 contributors. Read more More KDE: 20.08 releases branches created

Learn NixOS by turning a Raspberry Pi into a Wireless Router

A lot of the Nix documentation seems to be aimed at a very particular kind of desktop user: someone who already has Nix installed! Such users represent an important use case, and the nix build configurations are easy enough to read. However, I definitely think there is on-boarding improvement work to be done in the Nix ecosystem. So, will I ever go back? I don't think so! This router was so cheap (~$40) and the Raspberry Pi 3B+ is so powerful that I get amazing performance throughout my entire apartment. If it ever breaks, the Pi will be trivial to replace. I am really happy with what I created. Even if this little project isn't original, it solves a real problem in my day-to-day life. In terms of NixOS as a Linux distribution, I think I now am totally on board. Nix has so many incredible advantages that (as a control freak who builds his own WiFi router) I just can't ignore or give up. The feature of Ubuntu that was keeping me on that distribution for so long was that "it just works" © ®. But Nix "just works" too. The only catch is that you need to know what "it" is that you want working ahead of time. I am also comfortable with responsibly using environments, so I think that increases my willingness to jump into a new OS framework. I am a little worried about moving from Ubuntu to Nix on an existing machine, but that is what external hard drive backups are for! Read more