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KDE

I Love my new KDE Plasma Desktop Layout, Here’s How I did it

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KDE

About a month or so ago, I decided to re-arrange my KDE desktop layout. I took a new approach, one that I came up with all by myself (using the customization options already graciously provided by the KDE desktop, of course). Then I made a few slight changes on the way, and I’m extremely happy with the results.

With the new setup, not only my desktop looks minimalist and beautiful (I think), but it’s easier to use as well. That being said, preference is highly individual, but I thought a short article about how I set it up might look appealing to someone other than myself.

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This week in KDE: Libinput scroll speed, Dolphin remote access improvements, and more

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KDE

This week’s update includes an eclectic collection of bugfixes and new features, some of them quite annoying or longstanding–such as being able to use Dolphin’s terminal panel on remote locations, set the scroll speed when using the Libinput driver (at least on Wayland), and connect to Samba shared on a workgroup with a space in the name. But wait, there’s more…

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KDE: Forking Qt, Plasma Bigscreen and Release of Latte Dock 0.9.11

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Development
KDE
  • More Open-Source Participants Are Backing A Possible Fork Of Qt

    This week's bombshell that future Qt releases might be restricted to paying customers for a period of twelve months has many open-source users and developers rightfully upset. Qt so far only provided a brief, generic statement but several individuals and projects are already expressing interest in a Qt fork should it come to it.

    The hope is first and foremost that The Qt Company and KDE / KDE Free Qt Foundation can reach a mutual agreement without this embargo on future releases, which would effectively close up its development. But should an agreement go unresolved and The Qt Company go ahead with their plans in the name of boosting short-term revenues stemming from the coronavirus, developers are expressing a willingness to fork should it come it.

  • New Linux integrity checker from Microsoft, Raspberry Pi smart TV replacement from KDE, and more open source news

    I recently bought a new TV and, if you haven’t been in the market lately, it’s hard to find “dumb” televisions. I didn’t want a smart TV because I worry about the manufacturer abandoning the software and what the device might do with my data. So KDE’s recent Plasma Bigscreen announcement caught my eye.

    Plasma Bigscreen takes the KDE Plasma interface I use every day and combines it with Mycroft AI to turn single-board computers into a smart TV. The beta, released last month, includes support for the Raspberry Pi 4 (Model Cool.

  • Latte bug fix release v0.9.11

    Latte Dock v0.9.11 has been released containing important fixes and improvements!

Qt and Free Software Contention

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Development
KDE
  • The growing disconnect between KDE and the Qt Company

    Here's a message posted by Olaf Schmidt-Wischhöfer to the kde-community mailing list detailing the current state of discussions between the KDE community, the Qt development project, and the Qt Company. It seems they are not going entirely well. "But last week, the company suddenly informed both the KDE e.V. board and the KDE Free QT Foundation that the economic outlook caused by the Corona virus puts more pressure on them to increase short-term revenue. As a result, they are thinking about restricting ALL Qt releases to paid license holders for the first 12 months. They are aware that this would mean the end of contributions via Open Governance in practice."

  • Qt and Open Source

    There have been discussions on various internet forums about the future of Qt open source in the last two days. The contents do not reflect the views or plans of The Qt Company.

    The Qt Company is proud to be committed to its customers, open source, and the Qt governance model.

  • The Qt Company Provides A Brief Comment On Open-Source

    Yesterday a KDE developer who serves on the board of the KDE Free Qt Foundation commented that The Qt Company is evaluating restricting new releases to paying customers for 12 months. That was said to be under consideration due to COVID19 / coronavirus impacting their finances and needing to boost short-term revenues. The Qt Company has now come out with an incredibly brief statement on the matter.

    Obviously many are concerned that The Qt Company could be erecting a wall around new Qt releases with this possible year delay before going out cleanly as open-source. This comes months after The Qt Company already shifted to make Qt LTS releases customer-only, among other steps to boost their commercial business at the beginning of the year.

Qt and KDE Development

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • New Qt Releases Might Now Be Restricted To Paying Customers For 12 Months

    With an apparent blame on the novel coronavirus, The Qt Company is said to be considering restricting new Qt releases to paying customers for a period of twelve months in an effort to boost their near-term finances.

    Earlier today The Qt Company published a 2020 Qt road-map while following that a Phoronix reader tipped us off to the latest discussions between KDE, the Qt project, and The Qt Company.

    KDE and the open-source Qt folks have been in discussions with The Qt Company especially with the restrictions announced back in January by The Qt Company that LTS point releases might only be available to commercial customers, Qt Accounts being needed for binary package downloads, etc.

  • Qt, Open Source and corona
    Dear KDE community,
    
    the relationship between the KDE community, the Qt project and The Qt Company 
    has always been close and beneficial for all three.
    
    * The Qt Company benefits from having a large and healthy community of 
    contributors, developers and experts around their product.
    * KDE benefits from being able to use Qt and to contribute directly to Qt.
    * The Qt project benefits from having the company as a steward and very large 
    contributor, and having KDE as a large and well-known sub-community.
    
    Last December, I published a document explaining the win-win-win-relationship: 
    http://www.olafsw.de/a-better-qt-because-of-open-source-and-kde/
    
    
    Unfortunately, The Qt Company is currently considering to stop this healthy 
    cooperation.
    
    Fortunately, the KDE Free Qt Foundation exists, which secures the continued 
    existence of Open Source Qt:
    https://kde.org/community/whatiskde/kdefreeqtfoundation.php
    Together with Martin Konold, I represent KDE in the board of the foundation.
    
    
    I will now give you a bit of background information.
    
    During the past two years, there have been negotiations between The Qt Company 
    and the KDE Free Qt Foundation for updating the contract.
    
    Our goals in negotiations:
    * helping the company increase their revenue without harming the Qt project or 
    the KDE community
    * strengthening the protection of the Qt project and of the KDE community
    * avoiding a parting of ways between The Qt Company and the Qt+KDE communities
    
    Concrete areas included in the negotiations are:
    
    * Fixing the incompatibility between paid Qt license terms and using or 
    contributing to Open Source
    (“Prohibited Combination” in https://www.qt.io/terms-conditions/ )
    * Fixing the license incompatibility between the Qt Design Studio (which is 
    only partly Free Software) and our existing contract with the company
    * Making our contract with the company stronger, requiring them to make 
    immediate Free Software releases of Qt (currently, they are allowed to delay 
    by 12 months) to ensure the availability of LTS security fixes for KDE
    * Updating our contract to include Wayland
    * Evaluating contract changes suggested by the company aimed at making the Qt 
    business more profitable, for example the option of selling bundles of Qt with 
    other software, or making integrations with proprietary third-party software 
    possible
    
    
    One setback in the negotiations has been an announcement of The Qt Company in 
    January: https://www.qt.io/blog/qt-offering-changes-2020
    They announced that LTS releases of Qt will only be available for paid license 
    holders. It is still unclear what this implies for contributions to Qt and for 
    the sharing of security fixes between the various parties (including The Qt 
    Company, the many Qt experts contributing, the KDE community, and Linux 
    distributions).
    
    At an in-person meeting in Frankfurt on March 6, we nevertheless managed to 
    lay the groundwork for a possible path forward, continuing with an approach 
    beneficial to all sides.
    
    
    But last week, the company suddenly informed both the KDE e.V. board and the 
    KDE Free QT Foundation that the economic outlook caused by the Corona virus 
    puts more pressure on them to increase short-term revenue. As a result, they 
    are thinking about restricting ALL Qt releases to paid license holders for the 
    first 12 months. They are aware that this would mean the end of contributions 
    via Open Governance in practice.
    
    Obviously, it cannot be in the middle- and long-term health of The Qt Company 
    to separate itself from the very strong Qt + KDE communities.
    
    We hope The Qt Company will reconsider. However, this threat to the Open 
    Source community needs to be anticipated, so that the Qt and KDE communities 
    can prepare themselves.
    
    The Qt Company says that they are willing to reconsider the approach only if 
    we offer them concessions in other areas. I am reminded, however, of the 
    situation half a year ago. We had discussed an approach for contract updates, 
    which they suddenly threw away by restricting LTS releases of Qt instead.
    
    
    What does this mean for the future of Qt and for the future of KDE?
    
    All software changes in Qt will still be available at as Open Source as 
    required by our contract – maybe with a delay of 12 months if the company 
    decides to part ways with the communities.
    
    We will continue to work on a contract update that helps all sides. But even 
    if these negotiations were to be unilaterally stopped by The Qt Company, Qt 
    will stay Open Source, and KDE will be able to use it. I am also absolutely 
    sure that the Qt + KDE communities will continue cooperation on new features, 
    bug fixes, and security fixes, even should The Qt Company decide to forgo the 
    benefits of cooperation.
    
    I invite The Qt Company to stay with us. It will be worthwhile.
    
    
    Best regards,
    
    Olaf
    
    
  • Learn PyQt: Packaging PyQt5 & PySide2 applications for Windows, with PyInstaller

    There is not much fun in creating your own desktop applications if you can't share them with other people — whether than means publishing it commercially, sharing it online or just giving it to someone you know. Sharing your apps allows other people to benefit from your hard work!

    The good news is there are tools available to help you do just that with your Python applications which work well with apps built using Qt5. In this tutorial we'll look at the most popular tool for packaging Python applications: PyInstaller.

    This tutorial is broken down into a series of steps, using PyInstaller to build first simple, and then increasingly complex PyQt5 applications into distributable EXE files on Windows. You can choose to follow it through completely, or skip ahead to the examples that are most relevant to your own project.

  • Virtual KDE PIM Sprint April 2020

    Last weekend would have been the traditional annual KDE PIM meeting in Toulouse, but with travel being largely shut down in Europe we had to do this virtually. That meant missing out on the culinary treats of being in France, but we got a few things done nevertheless.

    [...]

    Nico has been working on this, eventually enabling platform calendar abstraction behind the KCalendarCore API. So the same application code could be using a calendar from Akonadi on a desktop system and the Android calendar on a phone.

    We hopefully managed to sort out the remaining conceptual questions for this (modeling hierarchies, lazy population of expensive calendars, separate classes for the calendar metadata or not).

    Moving PIM modules to KDE Frameworks

    KDAV is nearing completion for transitioning to Frameworks after the 20.04 release (so in May or June). A final review pass resulted in a few more improvements and API cleanups.

    Following KDAV the possible candidates are the KGAPI library, which is already used externally and thus would benefit most, as well as the various email frameworks (MIME, IMAP, SMTP).

Qt 5.12.8 Released

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KDE

I am happy to inform you we have released Ot 5.12.8 today.

As earlier informed Qt 5.12 LTS is in 'strict' phase and so on it will receive only the most important bug fixes. But still this 8th patch release to Qt 5.12 LTS contains ~150 changes including fixes to more than 30 bugs. Please check most important changes from Qt 5.12.8 Changes Files.

Qt 5.12.8 can be updated to existing online installation by using maintenance tool. For new installations, please download latest online installer from Qt Account portal or from qt.io Download page. Offline packages are available for commercial users in the Qt Account portal and at the qt.io Download page for open-source users. You can also try out the Commercial evaluation option from the qt.io Download page.

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Also: The Qt Company Publishes A 2020 Roadmap Culminating With The Qt 6.0 Release

Maui Weekly Report

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Development
KDE

There has been a lot of work into the Maui Project, and the Nitrux team has been actively working on the apps, the framework, and the libraries to make the convergence experience something unique and reliable for our first stable release. Since last time we posted something about the project, many things are refactored, a lot of improvements and UI/UX paper-cut fixes are introduced, and new platforms now have support. We were present at the Plasma Mobile sprint at Berlin, working on improving the Maui apps experience for such a platform. In the sprint, the UBPorts developers were also present, and we are looking forward to seeing the Maui Apps in their platform.

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Qt Creator 4.12 RC released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.12 RC!

For an overview of the improvements in Qt Creator 4.12, please head over to the first Beta blog post.

Get Qt Creator 4.12 RC
The opensource version is available on the Qt download page under "Pre-releases", and you find commercially licensed packages on the Qt Account Portal. Qt Creator 4.12 RC is also available under Preview > Qt Creator 4.12.0-rc1 in the online installer. Please post issues in our bug tracker. You can also find us on IRC on #qt-creator on chat.freenode.net, and on the Qt Creator mailing list.

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Interview with Philipp Urlich

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KDE
Interviews

Since I was not keen on using Photoshop for painting (even though I worked for many years with Photoshop), I was looking for alternatives. Then I finally found Krita in 2018.

I love that it’s open source. It has many great tools for various tasks. The ability to create your own powerful brushes. I also love that you can do animations.

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Nate Graham on Latest KDE Improvements

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KDE

  • This week in KDE: Moar performance!

    Some very nice performance fixes landed this week, which should substantially boost move and copy speeds for local transfers and transfers to and from Samba shares in particular. But that’s not all, and there’s more on the menu…

  • KDE Starts April With Big Performance Jump For Local I/O + 50~95% Faster Samba Transfers

    KDE developers managed to squeeze some long-problematic I/O optimizations into the KDE code-base this week along with other enhancements to make for a nice first week of April.

    The performance work for kicking off April includes:

    - 50~95% faster transferring of large files to/from Samba shares. This big speed-up is a Dolphin improvement for a 2012 bug report. This fast-copy support for the Samba code should now allow "mount-level copy performance" thanks to various architectural changes in the code.

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today's howtos

NomadBSD 1.3.2 is now available!

We are pleased to present the release of NomadBSD 1.3.2. Read more

Python Programming

  • Pure Python Configuration Management With PyInfra

    Building and managing servers is a challenging task. Configuration management tools provide a framework for handling the various tasks involved, but many of them require learning a specific syntax and toolchain. PyInfra is a configuration management framework that embraces the familiarity of Pure Python, allowing you to build your own integrations easily and package it all up using the same tools that you rely on for your applications. In this episode Nick Barrett explains why he built it, how it is implemented, and the ways that you can start using it today. He also shares his vision for the future of the project and you can get involved. If you are tired of writing mountains of YAML to set up your servers then give PyInfra a try today.

  • GraphQL - ORM

    GraphQL aims to overcome REST's shortcomings through a flexible query language, and succeeds in doing so on the client side. But on the server side, GraphQL resolvers have effectively recreated the same over- and under- fetching problems that have long plagued ORMs. The fact that ORMs remain popular despite of their inefficiency is a testament to the benefits of having in-memory objects behave consistently. There is no such trade-off for server-side GraphQL, where the only point of the objects is to be immediately serialized. The so-called N+1 problem is generally acknowledged in the GraphQL community, but this article will argue only the symptoms are being addressed with workarounds like dataloader.

  • Massive memory overhead: Numbers in Python and how NumPy helps

    Those numbers can easily fit in a 64-bit integer, so one would hope Python would store those million integers in no more than ~8MB: a million 8-byte objects. In fact, Python uses more like 35MB of RAM to store these numbers. Why? Because Python integers are objects, and objects have a lot of memory overhead. Let’s see what’s going on under the hood, and then how using NumPy can get rid of this overhead.s

  • Can Anybody Become a Data Scientist?

    Introduction to Programming with Python is my first stop on this journey. RMOTR co-founder Santiago Basulto leads this course and, boy, does he cover a lot.

  • Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) in Python 3

    Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a method of structuring a program by bundling related properties and behaviors into individual objects. In this tutorial, you’ll learn the basics of object-oriented programming in Python. Conceptually, objects are like the components of a system. Think of a program as a factory assembly line of sorts. At each step of the assembly line a system component processes some material, ultimately transforming raw material into a finished product. An object contains data, like the raw or preprocessed materials at each step on an assembly line, and behavior, like the action each assembly line component performs.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: GSoC 2020 Blog Post (#3)
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: GSoC Weekly Blog #3
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: I'm Not Drowning On My Own
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Phase 2 - Weekly Check-in 6
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Board statement on the LibreOffice 7.0 RC “Personal Edition” label

Thanks to the hard work put in by many individual and ecosystem contributors, working together as a team in different fields, such as development, QA, design, marketing, localisation, release engineering, infrastructure, just to mention some, in a few weeks’ time we will be welcoming our LibreOffice 7.0 milestone. At the same time, we are discussing our vision for the next five years, with a starting point being marketing and branding. See our marketing and board-discuss mailing lists. Due to draft and development work in the area of branding and product naming, some speculation, in particular related to the “Personal Edition” tag shown in a LibreOffice 7.0 RC (Release Candidate), has started on several communication channels. So let us, as The Document Foundation’s Board of Directors, please provide further clarifications: 1. None of the changes being evaluated will affect the license, the availability, the permitted uses and/or the functionality. LibreOffice will always be free software and nothing is changing for end users, developers and Community members. 2. Due to the short time frame we are working with, the tagline appeared on the RC and we apologise if this caused some of you to think we unilaterally implemented the change. Rest assured that the consultation with the Community is still ongoing. Read more