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Qt 5.9 Alpha Released

Filed under
KDE

I am happy to inform you that Qt 5.9 Alpha has been released today.

Qt 5.9 Alpha is an important milestone on our way to the final Qt 5.9.0 release, which is targeted to be released by the end of May 2017.

The Alpha release is available only as source packages. Binary installers will be available via the online installer in conjunction with the Beta release as well as development snapshots during the coming weeks.

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Development News

Filed under
Development
KDE
  • Best practices for guiding new coders

    As the new year progresses, many free and open source projects are turning their attention to various formalized mentoring programs, such as Mozilla's Winter of Security, Outreachy, and (the program with my favorite name) the X.Org Endless Vacation of Code. Patterned after the success of Google's Summer of Code, these programs give many new programmers a chance to gain firsthand experience working within successful FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software) projects and the projects themselves access to fresh talent.

  • Developing an nrf51822 based embedded device with Qt Creator and Debian

    I'm currently developing an nRF51822-based embedded device. Being one the Qt/Qt Creator maintainers in Debian I would of course try to use it for the development. Turns out it works pretty good... with some caveats.

  • How to create a look and feel theme
  • Qt Roadmap for 2017

    With Qt 5.7 and 5.8 released we have a completely new baseline for Qt 5 based applications and devices. In this blog, I want to provide a roadmap update on what we are currently working on in the Qt R&D and what the future directions are.

  • Qt's Roadmap For 2017: Graphics, An Exciting Qt 5.9/5.10

    Tuukka Turunen of The Qt Company has shared some of the project's goals for the 2017 calendar year in delivering Qt 5.9 and Qt 5.10 along with more point releases.

    Qt developers hope to make 2017 exciting by shipping Qt 5.9 in May and their hope is to ship Qt 5.10 this November.

  • Intend to retire perl-Log-Any-Adapter-Dispatch

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Fedora 25 KDE: disappointing experience

    Fedora is not a frequent guest on the review deck of Linux notes from DarkDuck blog. The most recent review was of Fedora 22 back in July 2015. That was a review of the GNOME version, the most native for Fedora.

    You are probably aware of the tight link between the GNOME project and RedHat, the Fedora Project main sponsor.

  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 Unity 8 - KDE apps native on Mir
  • Plasma in a Snap?

    Shortly before FOSDEM, Aleix Pol asked if I had ever put Plasma in a Snap. While I was a bit perplexed by the notion itself, I also found this a rather interesting idea.

    So, the past couple of weeks I spent a bit of time here and there on trying to see if it is possible.

  • QStringView Diaries: Advances in QStringLiteral

    This is the first in a series of blog posts on QStringView, the std::u16string_view equivalent for Qt. You can read about QStringView in my original post to the Qt development mailing-list, follow its status by tracking the “qstringview” topic on Gerrit and learn about string views in general in Marshall Clow’s CppCon 2015 talk, aptly named “string_view”.

  • Making Movies with QML

    One of the interesting things about working with Qt is seeing all the unexpected ways our users use the APIs we create. Last year I got a bug report requesting an API to set a custom frame rate for QML animations when using QQuickRenderControl. The reason was that the user was using QQuickRenderControl as an engine to render video output from Qt Quick, and if your target was say 24 frames per second, the animations were not smooth because of how the default animation driver behaves. So inspired by this use case I decided to take a stab at creating such an example myself.

  • How to Create a Look and Feel Theme
  • United Desktop Theme for KDE Plasma 5.9
  • KDE Talks at FOSDEM

    The continuation of the original talk from Dirk Hohndel and Linus Torvalds about the port of Subsurface from Gtk to Qt, now with mobile in mind.

KDE Plasma 5.8.6 Released for LTS Users with over 80 Improvements, Bug Fixes

Filed under
KDE
Security

Today, February 21, 2017, KDE announced the availability of the sixth maintenance update to the long-term supported KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

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Plasma 5.9.2, Applications 16.12.2 and Frameworks 5.31.0 available in Chakra

Filed under
KDE

The latest updates for KDE's Plasma, Applications and Frameworks series are now available to all Chakra users.

Included with this update, is an update of the ncurses, readline and gnutls related group of packages, as well as many other important updates in our core repository. Be aware that during this update, your screen might turn black. If that is the case and it does not automatically restore after some time, then please switch to tty3 with Ctrl+Alt+F3 and then switch back to the Plasma session with Ctrl+Alt+F7. If that does not work, please give enough time for the upgrade to complete before shutting down. You can check your cpu usage using 'top' after logging in within tty3. You can reboot within tty3 using 'shutdown --reboot'.

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Interview: Thomas Weissel Installing Plasma in Austrian Schools

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

With Plasma 5 having reached maturity for widespread use we are starting to see rollouts of it in large environments. Dot News interviewed the admin behind one such rollout in Austrian schools.

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The State of Plasma

Filed under
KDE

Over the years, my experience with KDE can best be described as a rollercoaster – on ice, with rocket thrusters. KDE3.5 was a great release, followed by a somewhat mellow, emotionally curbed KDE4, which took years blossoming, and then when it finally gained solid form, it was replaced with KDE5, or rather, Plasma 5.

Since 2014, Plasma has kept me entertained and disappointed in equal measures. At some point, I had it crowned my favorite desktop, and then it went downhill steeply, fast, struggling to recover. Not helping was the slew of bugs and regressions across the distro space, which exacerbated the quality of Plasma and what it could show the world. Today, I would like to explore Plasma from a different angle. Not from the user perspective, but usability perspective. AKA Everything What Plasma Does. After me.

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KDE in Slackware, Cutelyst 1.4.0 Ready

Filed under
KDE
Slack
  • KDE 5_17.02 for Slackware-current is available

    I am happy to announce my February 2017 release of the ‘ktown’ packages: KDE 5_17.02. What you get in this new release is: KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, Plasma 5.9.2 and Applications 16.12.2. All built on top of Qt 5.7.1.
    Soon, I will compile this version of Plasma 5 on Slackware 14.2 (only 64bit) as well, but I gave priority last few days to the new LibreOffice packages and a new PLASMA5 Live image. The packages that I am releasing today are for Slackware-current only (both 32bit and 64bit). As stated in my previous post, I will no longer be releasing Plasma 5 packages for 32bit Slackware 14.2.

  • New Slackware PLASMA5 Live ISO (with Plasma 5.9)

    To conclude this week’s batch of updates in my repositories I have re-generated the ISO for PLASMA5 Slackware Live Edition – it is based on liveslak 1.1.6.2 and using Slackware-current dated “Mon Feb 13 06:21:22 UTC 2017“.

    If you already use PLASMA5 Live on a USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content.

  • Cutelyst 1.4.0 released, C100K ready.

    Thanks to the last batch of improvements and with the great help of jemalloc, cutelyst-wsgi can do 100k request per second using a single thread/process on my i5 CPU. Without the use of jemalloc the rate was around 85k req/s.

    This together with the EPoll event loop can really scale your web application, initially I thought that the option to replace the default glib (on Unix) event loop of Qt had no gain, but after increasing the connection number it handle them a lot better. With 256 connections the request per second using glib event loop get’s to 65k req/s while the EPoll one stays at 90k req/s a lot closer to the number when only 32 connections is tested.

KDE Applications 17.04 Schedule

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Applications 17.04 Announced for April 20, Here's the Final Release Schedule

    KDE developer Albert Astals Cid announced that the release date of the upcoming KDE Applications 17.04 open-source software suite for KDE Plasma desktop environments, along with the final release schedule.

    We were just wondering when KDE Applications 17.04 will be released when the current KDE Applications 16.02 series received its second maintenance update, and we were right to believe at the point in time that the final release is coming in April, and, according to the release schedule, it looks like KDE Applications 17.04 lands April 20, 2017.

  • KDE Applications 17.04 To Be Released 20 April

    The release schedule for the upcoming KDE Applications 17.04 has been firmed up.

    The KDE Applications 17.04 release is scheduled to happen on 20 April. For that to happen, the planned dependency freeze is 16 March, the beta release on 23 March, KDE applications 17.04 Release Candidate on 6 April, and prepping for the actual 17.04 release beginning on 13 April.

KDE and Qt

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.9.2 Desktop Rolls Out on Valentine's Day with Multiple Bug Fixes

    It's Valentine's Day, and to celebrate this important event, the KDE developers demonstrate their love for KDE Plasma users by bringing them a new maintenance update for the KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop environment.

    Yes, we're talking about KDE Plasma 5.9.2, the second point release to the latest KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop, which launched just two weeks ago for various GNU/Linux distributions, including KDE Neon and Arch Linux. Because of the new, fast release cycle, you see this new version just one week after the first update, namely KDE Plasma 5.9.1.

  • An Early Qt 5.9 Alpha Snapshot: Qt 5.9 Packing A Ton Of Features

    While Qt 5.8 was released less than one month ago, the Qt 5.9 Alpha release is on approach for landing.

    Jani Heikkinen today announced the first Qt 5.9 Alpha snapshot. This isn't the formal Qt 5.9 Alpha release, but will become the official Alpha source package if there isn't anything important that's missing. Hit up that mailing list link if you are interested in testing.

  • First Qt 5.9 alpha snapshot available
  • KDE's Plasma Discover Package Manager to Support Flatpak Packages and Repos

    It looks to us like Flatpak, the open-source application sandboxing and distribution framework for GNU/Linux systems is on its way to becoming the norm on most distributions.

    Not only that GNOME Software offers support for Flatpak runtimes, but it appears that KDE's Plasma Discover graphical package manager will do too, as KDE developer Jan Grulich reports today on the upcoming availability of a Flatpak backend to implement support for handling Flatpak packages and repositories in the app.

  • KDE Discover flatpak backend

    As some of you might already know, I’ve been focusing lately on Flatpak and its integration into KDE. You can check my work on Flatpak KDE portals, which are being currently included in our KDE runtimes and repositories were migrated to KDE git so there has been made some progress since last time I talked about them. Recently I started looking into adding Flatpak support to KDE Discover, to have same support for Flatpak as Gnome has with gnome-software. From the begining it was a nightmare for me as I have never used any glib based library so that slowed me down little bit. I also went through gnome-software code to understand how flatpak integration is done there to get some inspiration. Things went well since then and I have already quite nice stuff to share with you. We currently support most common functionality, like listing available/installed flatpak applications in Discover with possibilities to install/remove/update and of course launch them. We also support flatpak bundles and flatpakref files already.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Graphics

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source IoT on Steady Enterprise March
    Enterprise IT decision makers have been exploring the potential of Internet of Things technologies, but they are not rushing IoT projects into development and are showing caution in their adoption commitments, according to survey results Red Hat released Wednesday. Of the 215 participants in the company's survey, "Enterprise IoT in 2017: Steady as she goes," 55 percent indicated that IoT was important to their organization. However, only a quarter of those organizations actually were writing project code and deploying IoT technologies.
  • WSO2 Offers Open Source Enterprise Mobility Management
    The software is fully open source under the Apache License 2.0. Source code is available on GitHub.
  • 5 trends impacting enterprise mobility in 2017
    At this point, there’s little left to say that’s new about the impact the IoT can have on the enterprise. Although the potential size of the IoT market is often hyped, the opportunities now available in various lines of business are indisputable. IoT enables entities (i.e. consumers, businesses, and governments) to connect to and control IoT devices in areas like energy, manufacturing, transportation, agriculture, and more.
  • China Unicom & Radisys use CORD architecture to build better networks
  • Radisys launches open source RAN software for M-Cord project
  • Haddington Dynamics Releases Entire Source Code for Dexter Open-Source Robot, Invites Global Collaboration
  • Twilio paid $8.5 million in cash for assets of Kurento Open Source Project
    Twilio has been making strides to improve its WebRTC capabilities and part of its strategy includes making acquisitions to advance its objective. In September, the cloud-based telephony company purchased the team behind the Kurento Open Source Project and its assets. At the time, the financial terms were not disclosed, but now we know the deal was for $8.5 million in cash. In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Twilio revealed that it had picked up proprietary WebRTC media processing technologies; select licenses, patents, and trademarks; and some employees who worked on the service, although specifics were not provided.
  • What to do when people start hacking your culture
    I've previously written about the fact the Apache Software Foundation offers an exemplar of large-scale open source governance. Even with those supreme qualities, things can still go wrong. Apache offers some of the best protections for open source contributors but its mature rules can be manipulated by skilled politicians and/or determined agendas. What can we learn from their experience? In a very small proportion of Apache projects, there have been issues that seem to arise from Apache's rules and culture being intentionally gamed. They are a non-representative fraction of the work of Apache, but they provide valuable lessons on the way open source communities can be gamed. In this article I mention two such projects: Apache Harmony, an implementation of Java SE created independently of Sun that's now in the Apache Attic, and Apache OpenOffice, one of the successors to the OpenOffice.org project that closed after Oracle bought Sun Microsystems.
  • Embedded Linux Conference Features IoT and Development Tools
    The 2017 Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) is off to a fine start even as the rain clears up here in Portland, Ore. I don’t often get to sit in on technical sessions at trade shows because of a host of meetings, but this is the exception. If you get a chance, and Linux or Android is in your bailiwick, then ELC is worth attending. It delves into the technical details for using Linux and application spaces like the Internet of Things (IoT), with more hands-on details than our popular (but higher-end) IoT show, IoT Emerge, which will be returning this fall. IoT Emerge provides a high-level view of IoT applications and issues, whereas ELC is for the hardcore developers.

Red Hat News

  • HPE, Red Hat Team on Storage, OpenStack for NFV
    Hewlett Packard Enterprise (NYSE: HPE) and Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT) announced today they are working together to accelerate the deployment of network functions virtualization (NFV) solutions based on fully open, production-ready, standards-based infrastructures. HPE plans to offer ready-to-use, pre-integrated HPE NFV System solutions and HPE Validated Configurations incorporating Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Ceph Storage for communications service providers (CSPs).
  • Irish unit of open source software developers Red Hat sees profits jump
    A Cork-based subsidiary of open source software specialist Red Hat reported a sharp rise in revenues and profits last year, recently lodged accounts show. Red Hat Ltd, whose parent acquired Irish software firm Feed Henry for €63.5 million in September 2014, recorded a pretax profit of €33.2 million for the 12 months ending February 2016. This compares with a profit before tax of €26.6 million a year earlier.
  • From SAP to Red Hat: Lenovo to leverage partnerships to boost data center numbers
    A week after Lenovo executives pointed to partnerships as a way to drive numbers in its data center business, the company has announced an expanded relationship with SAP. It’s the latest in a string of partnerships, from Red Hat to Nutanix (Nasdaq: NTNX), all targeted to help Lenovo better compete.
  • Notable Runners: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT), Genuine Parts Company (NYSE:GPC)

Leftovers: Software

  • 3 mind mapping tools in Fedora
    In a previous Magazine article, we covered tracking your time and tasks. In that article we mentioned some mind mapping tools. Now we’ll cover three mind mapping apps you can use in Fedora. You can use these tools to generate and manipulate maps that show your thoughts. Mind maps can help you to improve your creativity and effectiveness. You can use them for time management, to organize tasks, to overview complex contexts, to sort your ideas, and more.
  • 10 command-line tools for data analysis in Linux
    So you've landed on some data you want to analyze. Where do you begin? Many people used to working in a graphical environment might default to using a spreadsheet tool, but there's another way that might prove to be faster and more efficient, with just a little more effort. And you don't need to become an expert in a statistical modeling language or a big data toolset to take advantage of these tools. I'm talking about the Linux command line. Just using some tools that you've probably already got installed on your computer, you can learn a lot about a dataset without ever leaving your terminal. Long-time Linux users will of course laugh—they've been using many of these tools for years to parse logs and understand configuration tools. But for the Linux newcomer, the revelation that you've got a whole data analysis toolkit already at your fingertips can be a welcomed surprise.
  • Trojita Is a Super Fast Desktop Email Client for Linux
    If you’re looking for a fast, IMAP compatible email client for Linux, why not try Trojita? Trojita aims to fetch and display email as quickly, and as efficiently, as possible. The open-source email app adheres to ‘open standards and modern technologies’, and is built around ‘the vendor-neutrality that IMAP provides’.
  • gparted 0.28.1
    A new version of gparted was released recently and I have updated the Fedora package to the latest version - 0.28.1. This version brings a rather exciting (at least, to me) update - ability to copy and resize already open LUKS filesystems.