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PCLOS

PCLinuxOS Screenshot Showcase, Member Spotlight and Obituary for Sproggy

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PCLOS
Obits
  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: rgradle

    PCLinuxOS (KDE) is currently running on my desktop machine (ASUS m/b with AMD A10 processor), and on an HP laptop computer (AMD Phenom II/Mate). Performance on the desktop machine is great, but a bit slow on the laptop. I do some video editing for my church on the desktop machine using Kdenlive, a native Linux application that is very powerful. I also do some graphics development for the church using GIMP. Very powerful, but long learning curve with GIMP. Now I wish I had paid more attention to the GIMP articles that appeared in the PCLinuxOS magazine some time ago. I have a Windows 10 virtual machine on my desktop computer for a few applications that will not run under Linux. My wife, a Windows user from way back, was right at home on her KDE desktop in no time at all. When people try to tell me how complicated Linux is to use, I always bring up my my wife's experience as an example of how easy Linux, and especially PCLinuxOS, is to use.

    One of the things I always appreciate about PCLinuxOS is that the software is well thought out, meaning that the updates generally work well and without problem. This is really a nod to those to maintain the software in the repository. Thank you, thank you. Also, I always appreciate the help available on the forum. Even when I have made newbie errors, someone is always willing to provide direction to get me on the path forward. Just outstanding.

  • R.I.P, Sproggy! You Will Be Missed!

    On December 23, 2019, our beloved PCLinuxOS family member, Sproggy, lost his battle with cancer.

    [...]

    When I first joined the PCLinuxOS forum, Sproggy was a moderator. We both hit it off pretty early on. My interactions with him increased a lot when I took over the editor's role for the magazine. We would chat frequently -- usually daily -- in the magazine's IRC channel on FreeNode, then called #pclinuxos.mag (it's now #pclosmag).

    We would chat about everything and anything. We'd talk about family, politics (particularly anytime there was a General Election coming up in the U.K.), world events, personal trials and tribulations, work, what's for dinner, and sometimes just nonsense. There was hardly a topic we didn't touch on. At that time, the magazine's IRC channel was a hopping place. Joble, Hootiegibbon, CSolis, grnich, ms_meme, AndrezjL, Meemaw, myself and many others frequently hung out there. Sproggy would join in on the conversations with just about everyone.

The January 2020 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the January 2020 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

The December 2019 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the December 2019 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS Gets November 2019 ISO with Refreshed Themes, Latest Updates

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS community released their monthly ISO snapshots for November 2019, a release that contains all the latest bug and security updates, as well as various improvements.

PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is out now as the latest and most up to date installation medium for this independently developed and user-friendly GNU/Linux distribution, including a fully updated system with all the updates released as of November 12th, 2019, with refreshed themes for GRUB, bootsplash, and the desktop.

PCLinuxOS 2019.11 is available in there different edition, with the KDE Plasma 5, Xfce, and MATE desktop environments. The PCLinuxOS 2019.11 KDE edition ships with the latest KDE Plasma 5.17.3 desktop environment, as well as the KDE Applications 19.08.3 and KDE Frameworks 5.64.0 open-source software suites.

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PCLinuxOS Articles of Interest

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PCLOS
  • Mind Your Step, Part 3

    On September 30th, Forever 21 filed bankruptcy and subsequently, all of its stores closed down. GameStop is predicted to be the next retailer to go.

    GameStop started out as Electronics Boutique back in the 1990s, which was itself spun off from Waldenbooks, of which it, competitor Borders and Builder's Square were purchased by K-Mart Corporation (pre-Sears)...and we all know what happened there. GameStop was spared its demise since it was spun off from Waldenbooks.

    I remember Electronics Boutique well, because not only did it sell video games and gaming consoles, but it also sold PC software. It is there where I purchased copies of Lotus Improv, Turbo Pascal for Windows and Turbo C++ for Windows. (I was running OS/2 at that time.)

    GameStop is still a functioning retailer, but for how long? Last time I was in a GameStop, they sold the major consoles and all the popular games. For a while, they were selling second hand iPhones and Android powered smartphones. Other than that, there is a 50/50 mix of new and used gaming hardware and software, including some PC-based titles that could run on Wine.

    At times, I would find a MS-DOS based title now and then, but even that is becoming a rarity. (A better source for MS-DOS titles would be a thrift store such as Goodwill.)

    What could ultimately kill GameStop would be the next generation of gaming consoles, which would require a high speed internet connection to function as all games would be online games (i.e. no CD/DVD/Blu-Ray discs needed). The currently available Sony PlayStation 4 largely depends on the Internet to function.

  • De-Googling Yourself

    Last month, we paused this series of articles to address Richard Stallman's departure from the FSF presidency. Now let's get back to our subject, which is to introduce alternative services to Google's.

  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: rolgiati

    Why and when did you start using Linux?

    When: In the days when Slackware became available on the Walnut Creek CDROM (and not a stack of 20-odd 3.5" floppies). It must have been 1993 or 1994, when one had to buy Mosaic to surf the web, because there were no free browsers then

    Why: In four words "Blue Screen Of Death". Got fed up with the inadequacy of MS Windows, read about Linux, got the Slackware CD and was hooked. Later, I moved to Mandrake/Mandriva/Mageia, flirted with Debian (then Devuan when the Poettering Plague started spreading), and finally PCLOS where I rejoiced in finding again all the Drak/Drax tools I had been sorely missing in Debian/Devuan.

  • Screenshot Showcase
  • Special Drivers In PCLinuxOS, Part 1
  • Texstar Taking Care Of Business

The November 2019 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the November 2019 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS 2019.10 updated installation media release

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GNU
Linux
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS project has announced the release of updated installation media for PCLinuxOS. The new media carries the version number 2019.10 and contains a fully updated system as of October 15 2019. Please note it is not required to do a clean installation each month since PCLinuxOS is a rolling release. These ISOs are being provided so new users don’t have a large update to perform after installation from a dated ISO.

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The October 2019 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the October 2019 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS 2019.09 updated installation media release

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GNU
Linux
PCLOS

The KDE versions both full and the minimalistic Darkstar contain kernel 5.2.15 plus a fully updated KDE Plasma desktop. Plasma desktop 5.16.5, Plasma Applications 19.08.1 and Plasma Frameworks 5.62.

The Mate Desktop was refreshed with kernel 5.2.15 and the applications and libraries were updated to their most recent stable versions from the previous release.

The Xfce Desktop was tweaked and now uses the Whisker menu by default. A login sound was added and the applications were updated along with some minor bug fixes.

In addition all ISOs now include the Nvidia 430.50 driver and will be used instead of the nouveau driver if your video card supports it. Hardware detection scripts were updated to provide better support for video cards that can use the Nvidia 430.50 driver. Pulseaudio has been updated to the stable 13.0 release. The Simple Update Notifier was reworked and now works for keeping you notified of system updates and the ability to update from the applet using apt-get. Small improvements were made to the Live media boot scripts. Vbox test media is also included on the installation media. This program allows you to quickly test an ISO on the fly or usbstick with various options without having to create a permanent VM in Virtualbox. Requires a valid Virtualbox installation. Thanks to the people involved for their contributions to this program.

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The September 2019 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the September 2019 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

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today's leftovers and howtos

  • Road Map for 2020

    Following the last year's leitmotif of "bridging worlds", we turn our attention to the removal of the hurdles faced by aspiring developers and users. During the annual road-map discussion on our mailing list, we identified four tangible approaches towards that goal. First, making Sculpt OS more user friendly. Second, reinforcing trust in Genode by fostering the framework's high quality. Third, making the tooling around Genode a joy to use. And finally, the illustration of Genode's versatility in the form practical use cases.

  • Genode OS Draws Up 2020 Plans Of USB Audio, A Kernel Written In Ada

    The Genode operating system framework that's been going strong for over a decade and continuing to employ a micro-kernel architecture continues to plan for an interesting future. The twelve year old Genode OS open-source project has drawn up an interesting road-map for 2020. Some of their plans for this year include: - 64-bit ARM (specifically the i.MX8 SoC) support for its general purpose Sculpt OS operating system.

  • Incentivizing Accessible Design

    When scholars contemplate the legal tools available to policymakers for encouraging innovation, they primarily think about patents. If they are keeping up with the most recent literature, they may also consider grants, prizes, and taxes as means to increase the supply of innovation. But the innovation policy toolkit is substantially deeper than that. To demonstrate its depth, this Article explores the evolution of designs that help people with disabilities access the world around them. From artificial limbs to the modern wheelchair and the reshaping of the built environment, a variety of legal doctrines have influenced, for better and for worse, the pace and direction of innovation for accessible design. This Article argues that two of the most important drivers of innovation for accessible design have been social welfare laws and antidiscrimination laws. Both were responsible, in part, for the revolution in accessibility that occurred in the second half of the twentieth century. Unlike standard innovation incentives, however, these laws operate on the “demand side.” Social welfare laws and antidiscrimination laws increase the ability and willingness of parties to pay for accessible technology, ultimately leading to greater supply. But in doing so, these laws generate a different distribution of the costs and benefits of innovation. They also produce their own sets of innovation distortions by allowing third parties to make decisions about the designs that people with disabilities have to use. The law can promote innovation, and it can hinder it. The law’s relationship to the wheelchair, the most important accessibility innovation of the twentieth century, produced both results. Policymakers have choices about which legal incentives doctrines they can use and how they can use them. This Article evaluates those tools, and it provides guidelines for their use to encourage accessible technology in particular and innovation generally.

  • Introduction to the Linux terminal commands

    Those of you just beginning to learn the basics of Linux may be interested in a great video published by the YouTube channel Explaining Computers. The Linux Terminal tutorials are aimed at those of you moving from the Microsoft Windows operating system as well as users of the Raspberry Pi mini PC and similar. The 20 minute video covers a range of Linux terminal commands and Linux concepts, including navigating and manipulating drives and directories using the commands pwd, ls, lsblk, cd, mkdir, rmdir, cp, and mv. If you would like to play around with the Linux commands but don’t have a Linux system you can also use a terminal emulator. A program that allows the use of the terminal in a graphical environment. Here are some free, commonly-used terminal emulators by operating system : Mac OS X: Terminal (default), iTerm 2 – Windows: PuTTY – Linux: Terminal, KDE Konsole, XTerm

  • How to install Microsoft fonts on Linux

Hardware for GNU/Linux

  • Linux-friendly medical PC supports Nvidia graphics

    IEI’s Linux-ready “HTB-200-C236” medical vision computer has a 6th Gen Xeon or 7th Gen Core CPU, PCIe x16 and x4 slots for Nvidia or Mustang cards, and AetherAI pathology modules for bone marrow smear, cancer screening, and object detection. IEI has launched an edge AI computer aimed at the medical industry in collaboration with AetherAI, which is furnishing three preloaded AetherAI pathology modules. The HTB-200-C236 runs Linux or Win 10 on a 6th Gen Skylake Intel Xeon E3-1268LV with 4x 2.4GHz/3.4GHz cores and an Intel C326 chipset. An optional 7th Gen Kaby Lake, quad-core Core i5-7500T has the same 35W TDP.

  • Lindenis V536 SoM & SBC Targets 4K Camera Applications

    Back in summer 2018, we wrote about Lindenis V5 single board computer based on Allwinner V5 quad-core Cortex-A7 processor with two MIPI CSI connectors and designed for 4K cameras.

  • problem-oriented

    Don’t get me wrong; the MAAS doc is pretty solid. I just want to do more with it. As in not just update it for new versions, but make it come alive and show off what MAAS can do. I also want to pick up some of the mid-range applications and situations. MAAS is well-envisioned in large datacentres, and there are obviously hobbyists and small shops tinkering, but that’s not the bulk of people who could genuinely benefit from it. I want to dig into some of the middle-industry, small-to-medium-size possibilities. Since I already know something about small hospital datacentres, having worked with them for about ten years, that might be a good place to start. Hospitals from 50-200 beds tend to have the same requirements as a full-size facility, but the challenges of a somewhat smaller budget and lower IT headcount. It really feels like a good sample problem for MAAS.

Security: Patches, KeePass2 and Healthcare

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (openconnect), Fedora (e2fsprogs, glibc, kernel, and nss), openSUSE (Mesa, php7, and slurm), Oracle (.NET Core, java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, and thunderbird), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk, openvswitch, and openvswitch2.11), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk), SUSE (java-11-openjdk, libssh, libvpx, Mesa, and thunderbird), and Ubuntu (libbsd and samba).

  • KeePass2 2.44 Released with True Key 4 CSV Import

    KeePass 2.44 was released a days ago as the latest stable mono password manager. Users of any previous 2.x version are recommended to upgrade. KeePass Password Safe was a Windows only password manager. Through the use of Mono, KeePass 2.x works on Linux and Mac OS.

  • Convenience over security: Mobile healthcare apps open up fresh risks to patients’ data

    Healthcare is increasingly going mobile, as hospitals and medical practitioners look to reduce waiting room times by harnessing the benefits of treatment on the go. But patients are often placing too much trust in these apps, which can often expose them to fresh security and privacy risks. The rapid growth of mobile healthcare app market was borne more out of necessity than any medical advancement, in the view of Adam Piper, a software developer working in the UK. “If I want to get a doctor’s appointment, it has to be today, and by 8.01am all the appointments are gone,” Piper told The Daily Swig.