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PCLOS

PCLinuxOS 64 Trinity 2016.07 Community Edition Switches to Linux Kernel 4.6.3

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After we announced the release of the PCLinuxOS 64 Xfce 2016.07 Community Edition and PCLinuxOS 64 LXDE 2016.07 Community Edition distributions, the time has come for you to download PCLinuxOS 64 Trinity 2016.07 Community Edition.

Created by PCLinuxOS senior member reelcat, the PCLinuxOS 64 Trinity Community Edition operating system is using the same acclaimed GNU/Linux technologies that are behind the official PCLinuxOS editions, but built around the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE) project that tries to keep the spirit of the KDE 3.5 desktop alive.

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PCLinuxOS 64 LXDE 2016.07 Community Edition Released with Linux Kernel 4.6.3

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We reported a few days ago that PCLinuxOS tester Ika has announced the release of his PCLinuxOS 64 Xfce 2016.07 and PCLinuxOS 64 LXDE 2016.07 Community Edition operating systems.

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PCLinuxOS Xfce 64 2016.07 Community Edition Ships with Linux Kernel 4.6.3

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Following on the release of PCLinuxOS MATE 64 2016.07, Ika, the maintainer of the PCLinuxOS LXDE and Xfce community editions, proudly announced today, July 9, 2016, the release of the PCLinuxOS LXDE 64 2016.07 and PCLinuxOS Xfce 64 2016.07.

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PCLinuxOS 64 2016.07 MATE Edition Lands with Linux Kernel 4.6.3 and MATE 1.14.1

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PCLinuxOS developer Texstar has had the great pleasure of announcing the availability of July's respin ISO image for the PCLinuxOS 64 MATE Edition operating system, version 2016.07.

PCLinuxOS 64 2016.07 MATE comes exactly one month after the debut of June's update of the distribution built around the customizable and lightweight MATE desktop environment, and it looks like it's full of goodies. For example, the distro is now powered by the latest and most advanced kernel, Linux 4.6.3.

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Also: PCLinuxOS 2016.07 "MATE" has just been released

July 2016 issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine released

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The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the July 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS 64 2016.05 Trinity Linux OS Brings Back Old Memories for KDE3.5 Fans

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We've promised to introduce you, guys, to more PCLinuxOS editions as soon as we are in possession of the needed information, so today, June 15, 2016, we're presenting the PCLinuxOS Trinity Community Edition.

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PCLinuxOS 64 2016.06 LXDE Community Edition Out Now with Linux Kernel 4.4.11 LTS

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We introduced you last week to the PCLinuxOS 64 2016.06 MATE Edition, and the other day to the PCLinuxOS 64 2016.06 Xfce Community Edition, and now the time has come for you to make acquaintance with the LXDE flavor of PCLinuxOS.

PCLinuxOS 64 2016.06 LXDE Community Edition was launched earlier this month, created by a PCLinuxOS community user and tester who goes by the name Ika, the same one that brought us the PCLinuxOS 64 2016.06 Xfce Community Edition operating system.

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PCLinuxOS 64 2016.06 Xfce Community Edition Arrives with Linux Kernel 4.4.11 LTS

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Thanks to one of our readers, we were able to report last week on the release of the PCLinuxOS 64 2016.06. MATE Edition operating system. However, today we would like to introduce our readers to the PCLinuxOS 64 2016.06 Xfce Edition OS.

PCLinuxOS 64 2016.06 Xfce is a community edition, built around the lightweight Xfce 4.12 deskop environment and powered by a kernel package from the long-term supported (LTS) Linux 4.4 series. Linux kernel 4.4.11 LTS is used in the PCLinuxOS 64 2016.06 Xfce Live ISO images at the moment of the launch.

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The June 2016 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the June 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

The May 2016 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

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The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the May 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

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Linux on laptops: Ubuntu 19.10 on the HP Dragonfly Elite G1

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How SUSE builds its Enterprise Linux distribution – PART 1

In 2020, one might think that Operating Systems in general are not interesting any more, possibly because some have an interest on shifting the attention to an “upper layer”, like Cloud or Containers. But even if the OS lost it’s former attraction, somehow you (or someone else) still needs a software system that manages computer hardware, software resources and provides services to applications and users. Obviously an OS is essential but it needs everything around it to serve an higher purpose than just a basic interface between human and hardware. As of now with the increased pace of new technologies and changes to the “upper layer”, a modern Operating System needs to adapt, support new hardware, new software, and needs. But also be stable, resilient and secure to properly host the “upper layer”. But before we discuss modern days, let’s have a look back in the past. [...] SUSE is a long lasting player in the GNU/Linux Operating Systems, as you might know SUSE once stood for Software-und System-Entwicklung (Software and Systems Development), and was created in 1992 doing a lot of translation, documentation and hacking (on technologies but not subverting computer security). The same year we were distributing the first comprehensive Linux Distribution (more than just Linux Kernel and GNU tools), called Softlanding Linux System (SLS), one of the earliest Linux Distributions at large. Soon we switched our focus from SLS to Slackware (initially based on SLS), by translating in German and supporting this new Linux Distribution. And thanks to this effort and experience, we were able to release S.u.S.E Linux 1.0 based on Slackware in 1994. This were really an exciting time for the Linux community, it was basically the beginning and everything rapidly changed or grew, new projects arise, new people started to contribute, in short a lot of things were in flux. Just two years after S.u.S.E Linux 1.0, in 1996, we have released SUSE Linux 4.2 our very first true SUSE distribution! which was not based on Slackware but on Jurix. Yet another big milestone was achieved in 2000, when we brought the first Enterprise Linux Distribution ever, with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (for IBM S/390)! Read more