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PCLOS

PCLinuxOS

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PCLOS

stephenstrail.blogspot: About 2 weeks ago, my wife discovered that her computer, running Ubuntu 8.04, would no longer read her digital cameras. As she was running the 64 bit version, and I was running the 32 on mine, I tried the cameras on my computer. No luck. What a disappointment! We had both happily been using Ubuntu for almost 2 years!

I remastered PCLinuxOS in French for my neighbor

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PCLOS
HowTos

wamukota.blogspot: One of the remarks I often read is that PCLinuxOS is an English only distro. While that is true when you download the iso, the road to make a localized remaster in another language is not so difficult for a somewhat handy linuxer.

A Look at PCLinuxOS

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PCLOS

tips-tricks-online.blogspot: Recently, I tried PCLinuxOS via the "live CD" route. I downloaded the .ISO image of the CDROM and then used Nero to burn the image onto a CDR.

PCLinuxOS Magazine May 2008 Released

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PCLOS

PCLinuxOS Magazine, May 2008 (Issue 21) is available to download. Some highlights include: Manage your Ipod with Amarok, PCLinuxOS Based Distros, and Quick Fix for Damaged Xorg.

9 features I wish Ubuntu had: or why I still prefer PCLinuxOS

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PCLOS

alternativenayk.wordpress: I’ve been using Ubuntu 8.04 for about four days now and I must admit that that I still prefer PCLinuxOS 2007 as my favourite entry-level Linux distribution. I’ve compiled a list of 9 features I wish Ubuntu had, which may help me change my mind.

PCLinuxOS

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PCLOS

amateurscientist18.blogspot: Its almost an year that I had my first date with PCLinuxOS. I was pretty comfortable with it from day 1. It came well bundled with a host of applications, both Geeky and non-Geeky.

Software Review - PCLinuxOS 2007

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PCLOS

dwilson333.wordpress: So, being a “Windows” guy as I’ve been called I have been trying to expand my knowledge base into Linux and Macintosh. The people at Linux Magazine included a Distribution called PCLinuxOS 2007 and it proclaims itself “Radically Simple”. For my first Linux review here, I am going to test that claim!

Tips & Tricks from PCLinuxOS Forum

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PCLOS

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Visiting PCLinuxOS Forum has been one of my hobbies. It updates my linux computing skills by providing me with the most practical solutions. Here is a list of some important tips and tricks directly from PCLinuxOS Forum.

Packing Punch Into PCLinuxOS

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PCLOS

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: I saw an interesting comment about remastering a linux that would be the real answer to Black XP. Good idea! Now what about packing those punches (software) into linux or more specifically PCLinuxOS?

Linux Magazine Italy Interview with Texstar of PCLOS

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PCLOS
Interviews

pclinuxos.com: I did an interview for Linux Magazine Italy - April Issue 2008. Here is a re-print of the interview for our English speaking members.

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