Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

PCLOS

PCLinuxOS Magazine's Latest: Interview, Screenshots and More

Filed under
PCLOS
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight - Snubbi

    I live in Denmark on Zealand, in the western part, not far from the sea.

    We live in an old half-timbered house from 1776. I have spent the last seven years renovating it completely, so we do not have to think about repairs in the future.

    The weather in Denmark has changed a lot in the last 20 years, as has the rest of the weather in the rest of the world. We have just had 10 days with 31-32oC (87.8-89.6oF) degree heat. That is a lot in Denmark, when the average daytime temperature is 18.4oC (65oF) in August.

    [...]

    My interest in Linux started in 1998. There was an article in a Danish newspaper.

    It sounded interesting, but I forgot about it until there was a CD with Red Hat 5.2 in a Danish IT magazine in February 1999.

    I used Windows 95 at that time. I got a larger hard drive in my old Olivetti computer, and installed it as a dual boot with Windows 95. I was immediately sold.

    In March 1999, I deleted Windows, and installed openSUSE 6.0. I have only used Linux since. Why did I switch to Linux? What interested me was that it was free and open, and you could do whatever you wanted with it. I have tried further 14 other distributions down the road.

    The fact that PCLinuxOS is a rolling release is a big plus. PCLinuxOS is rock solid stable, with tons of packages available in the repos. If you want a solid, stable, dependable Linux operating system, then you cannot go wrong with this distro. The forums are full of helpful members that will help with all sorts of issues. This is the way Linux should be. It is the distro for me, and here I intend to stay.

    What specific equipment do you currently use with PCLinuxOS?
    My desktop is an Intel Core i7-9700 4.7GHz 8-Core CPU. My laptop is a Lenovo ThinkPad L540 Processor: 2.6 GHz, Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-4300M CPU @ 2.60GHz.

    My wife and daughter have a Lenovo ThinkPad T400 IntelCore2Duo processor P8400 (2.26GHz), 3-MBL2 cache. All computers with PCLinuxOS MATE, so we call ourselves the Linux family.

  • PCLinuxOS Screenshot Showcase
  • The Social Dilemma

    Thanks to profiling and classification, social networks have become giant echo chambers, real bubbles that keep people away instead of bringing them closer, and create an illusion about the perceived reality that is very powerful and real. I already had the opportunity, using YouTube, to access a channel of extremist ideas, in political terms, with a YouTuber who had a strong speech against his opponents, and often insulted people who did not share his opinion. I will not mention the channel or YouTuber, since he does not deserve advertising or any other means to spread his extremist views. And, I accessed his channel a long time ago when it was a small channel, and when videos from his channel appeared on my timeline again, I chose to ignore them. It was content that is not important to me.

    Okay, his videos never appeared on my timeline again. Some time passed, about two years, more or less, and I was curious: Did that guy's channel close? No more videos of him ever appeared on my timeline, and I thought he had shut down his channel and given up. I looked for the channel, searching in YouTube, and there was his channel, firm and strong, with over 100 thousand subscribers. And I was speechless: Yeah, being rude and spreading hate speech is worth it. Gee, I'm doing it wrong, with my innocent Linux videos. I should speak ill of others and gain followers.

    However, this classification that applications make of the public transformed the internet into echo chambers, which separated people by their tendencies, their profiles. The danger of that? It was simple: minorities think they are majorities, think that everyone thinks the same way (because the algorithm hides different ideas) and creates a distorted view of reality. Thus, groups of people on social networks cannot be analyzed as majorities, or minorities. In fact, it's not even possible to know its size, since the algorithms make it difficult for people with different characteristics to interact, creating bubbles and filling these bubbles with certain groups, each classified in a different way, which is not transparent to its users.

  • Welcome From The Chief Editor

    That was the lesson that my wife and I received early in October. The person delivering that message? My seven year old son, Ryan.

    On an otherwise calm October 11, that "calm" was shattered when Ryan's grandmother -- my 78 year old mother -- fell at her home next door while cooking dinner, hit her head on the kitchen cabinets, and was unconscious. My 15 year old niece ran over to our house, crying and telling my wife that Grandma had fallen, and there was blood everywhere, and she wasn't waking up.

    Now, my wife and I have the same occupation. We're both respiratory therapists, just at different hospitals. We are quite accustomed to dealing with emergency situations. As for me ... I was at work at a small hospital 40 miles away. My wife was at home, with the kids (Ryan and Lexi), cleaning the house.

    Quickly, my wife asked if anyone had called 911, as she quickly put on some different clothes other than the ragged ones she was wearing to clean the house. Hearing this, and unbeknownst to anyone else, Ryan picked up the phone and called 911 himself, for his grandmother.

The November 2020 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the November 2020 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

Japanese IME on PCLinuxOS 64 KDE5 Magnum 2020 1015

Filed under
PCLOS

I recently saw that my install of PCLinuxOS was behaving funny after and update: the effects ceased working and web pages were loading slowly.

Last time this happened to me, I had to install a new iso because I had been working with a very old one.

This time, however, I had kept up with all the updates thanks to the convenient Simple Update Notifier, but something was not good.

Anyway, I decided to install the new PCLinuxOS 64 KDE5 Magnum 2020 1015. The installation went well, but I was worried because I normally install the PCLinuxOS GRUB2 on the distro partition, not on the MBR, but it was not possible for me to do it this time, so I was predicting a mess trying to boot OpenMandriva, Mageia, MX Linux, and Elive.

Read more

PCLinuxOS: Gerrit Draisma Interview, Users' Screenshots and a Welcome Message From The Chief Editor

Filed under
PCLOS

  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: Gerrit Draisma

    What would you like to see happen within PCLOS that would make it a better place? What are your feelings?

    A better place? I do not know, but this is what I like about PCLOS: It gives us access to state of the art software like the Gimp for photo editing, R for computations, Texlive for writing reports, Firefox and Thunderbird for staying connected, LibreOffice for occasional writing and drawing, Shotwell for organizing our photos, Skype for seeing the family and lots more. It has a forum that is nice to visit with helpful people from all over the world.

    And when doubting whether mankind is able to solve its problems in a peaceful way, I can always think of all the people that built this environment and keep it up! Thanks to all!

  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • PCLinuxOS Mag: Welcome From The Chief Editor

    Here's something that I bet many people don't know about me. I love doing woodworking. Oh, trust me. I'm no "master carpenter" like our forum buddy sam2fish. But, I still love working with wood. But between working my regular job, the magazine, wrangling two young children and taking care of other things that come up, I haven't had a lot of time to scratch my woodworking itch in quite some time.

    No, don't get me wrong. That itch is still present. I've not really had any extra time to work on scratching that itch. But that itch is becoming more prominent.

    When I first moved into my house, I built my own mailbox. I wanted it big enough so that any magazines I receive in the mail didn't have to be "rolled up" just to fit in the mailbox. It opens up sort of like a night deposit box, a box within a boxed frame that opens by tilting out the inner box at the top, where the top of the inner box is open for the placement of mail. I even built the handle for the mailbox, routing it out of a piece of wood with places for your finger tips. It's stained and finished, and looks as good today as the day I made it.

The October 2020 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the October 2020 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

PCLinuxOS: Interview, Screenshot Showcase and New Packages

Filed under
PCLOS
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight - wdt

    Since no one here uses Window$ (even if it is present on the HD), it is a non-issue. Except for ARM immaturity, Linux seems mostly trouble free. ARM, on the other hand ...

  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
  • Gramps updated to 5.1.3

    gramps (Genealogical Research and Analysis Management Programming
    System) is a GNOME based genealogy program supporting a Python
    based plugin system.

  • Palemoon Browser updated to 28.13.0

    Pale Moon is an open-source web browser with an emphasis on customizability; its motto is “Your browser, Your way”. There are official releases for Linux. Pale Moon is a fork of Firefox with substantial divergence.

The September 2020 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the September 2020 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

Misc. Software/Games Updates in PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS
  • Teamviewer updated to 15.9.4

    TeamViewer provides easy, fast and secure remote access and meeting solutions to Linux, Windows PCs, Apple PCs and various other platforms, including Android and iPhone.

  • Shortwave updated to 1.1.1

    Shortwave is a free radio streaming software with more than 20,000 radio stations from around the world.

  • Click-radio updated to 3.6

    A lightweight and simple gui interface media app

  • Thunderbird updated to 78.2.1

    Mozilla Thunderbird is a free and open-source cross-platform email client, news client, RSS, and chat client developed by the Mozilla Foundation. The project strategy was modeled after that of the Mozilla Firefox web browser.

  • Supertuxkart updated to 1.2

    SuperTuxKart is a free 3D kart racing game. The aim is to make the game fun more than to make it realistic. You can play with up to 4 friends on one PC, racing against each other or just try to beat the computer

Internet Explorer Officially Dead and PCLinuxOS Updates Chromium-Based Browsers

Filed under
PCLOS
Google
Microsoft
Web
  • Internet Explorer is dead as Microsoft kills off 25-year-old browser

    Microsoft has finally killed Internet Explorer The browser will be finished on 17 August, 2021, the company said.

  • [PC Linux OS] Vivaldi browser updated to 3.2.1967.45

    Vivaldi is a new web browser based on Chromium that is built by an Opera founder. It’s aimed mostly at power users, but it can be used by anyone.

  • [PC Linux OS] Opera browser updated to 70.0.3728.119

    Opera is a Chromium-based browser using the Blink layout engine. It differentiates itself because of a distinct user interface and other features.

  • Flashpeak Slimjet browser updated to 27.0.7.0

    Slimjet is built on top of the Chromium open-source project on which Google Chrome is also based. It enjoys the same speed and reliablity provided by the underlying blink engine as Google Chrome. However, many additional features and options have been added in Slimjet to make it more powerful, intelligent and customizable than Chrome. In addition to that, Slimjet DOES NOT send any usage statistics back to Google’s server like Google Chrome, which is a growing concern for many Chrome users due to the ubiquitous presence and reach of the advertising empire.

PCLinuxOS: Interview, systemd, Meemaw and Screenshot Showcase

Filed under
PCLOS
  • PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: pyjujiop

    I am a professional journalist who has been in the profession since 1993. At the current time I am a freelancer working for media relations firms and open to new clients! My main client is operated by an old colleague of mine, who is hoping to bring me on full-time.

    [...]

    I have two computers presently running PCLinuxOS as their primary OS. One is a Dell Inspiron 1545 laptop that has been completely overhauled; it now runs a 3.06 GHz T9900 CPU, 6 GB of RAM, and has both a 256GB SSD and a 640GB HDD installed. The other is a desktop with an Athlon X4 870K CPU at 3.9 GHz, with 16 GB of RAM and several HDDs and SSDs installed in the case. We have two other Windows machines and an Amazon tablet that Kay uses.

    [...]

    Honestly, I have no complaints about it. I would like PCLinuxOS to gain more users, but only because it would hopefully get more people to donate. I have no idea how Tex and the community manage to keep it as well maintained as they do. I returned to PCLinuxOS because I preferred the community-based model and the philosophy of this distro over using anything related to Ubuntu.

  • Mind Your Step: Miscellaneous Topics

    I have seen what could be accomplished with certain other distributions. The addition of support for FlatPak and AppImage applications is a great start towards the future of the distribution.

    I know we all hate systemd, so I won't even suggest the inclusion of this monstrosity. The original intention of systemd was to simplify the system initialization functions found in SysV INIT scripts as well as the scripts contained in the /etc/rc/rc.d directory into one system controlled by one daemon.

    Those of us who have worked with Mac OS-X or Windows in the past know what a PITA it is to maintain these operating systems and their startup routines. After having looked at systemd and its documentation, I do not see any reason why we should ever implement such a thing here!!!!!!

    But, what if there was another solution. MX-Linux (formerly MEPIS) has a solution in the form of the systemd API replacement package. Such a package would not be easy to implement, and if anyone had the time to do it, it could be done.

    But then, if Flatpak can be implemented without systemd, then is there really any reason why technologies such as Docker, Kubernetes, or even QEMU could be implemented without systemd?

    (BTW, I got QEMU 5.0 to compile on PCLinuxOS with all emulated processors enabled. It took three hours on my laptop, but it got the job done. I have yet to test it, though.)

    Another possibility is to create an ISO with the basics (including the base X.org installation), but without the graphical interface launching at startup. This would be useful for server installations, for low-spec machines, and for those of you who have trouble getting the graphical interface to work at all..

  • From The Chief Editor's Desk

    What we commonly call and hold dear as Linux almost had a different name. Torvalds briefly considered "Linux," a play on his first name and Unix, but considered it too egotistical. So, he changed the name to "Freax," combining the words "free," "freak," and "Unix." However, Ari Lemmke, one of the volunteer administrators of the FTP server at the Helsinki University of Technology at the time, thought "Freax" was a dumb name, and took it upon himself to rename it Linux. The name stuck.

    Tux, the Linux mascot, didn't come about until five years later. In 1996, when they were about to select the mascot, Torvalds mentioned he was bitten by a little penguin (Eudyptula minor) on a visit to the National Zoo & Aquarium in Canberra, Australia. Larry Ewing provided the original draft of today's well known mascot based on this description. The name Tux was suggested by James Hughes as derivative of Torvalds' UniX, along with being short for tuxedo, a type of suit with color similar to that of a penguin.

    ********************

    This month's magazine cover was designed by Meemaw. It celebrates the 29th anniversary of the Linux announcement, the announcement of the IBM PC on August 12, 1981, and August being Watermelon Month. During the dog days of summer, there's little else as refreshing as some ice cold watermelon to cool us off.

    Until next month, I bid you peace, happiness, prosperity, serenity, and continued good health!

  • [PCLinuxOS] Screenshot Showcase
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

New Systemd 247 Is Out For Linux Operating System As Major Release

Systemd, a controversial system and service manager for Linux operating systems, has a major version release as Systemd 247. Speaking of new changes, systemd 247 has added a new service called systemd-oomd to monitor and take action on processes when memory or swap goes above the configured limits. Systemd, a controversial system and service manager for Linux operating systems, has a major version release as Systemd 247. Speaking of new changes, systemd 247 has added a new service called systemd-oomd to monitor and take action on processes when memory or swap goes above the configured limits. Read more

Comparing the similarities and differences between inner source and open source

Open source software (OSS) has been around since the 1990s and has thrived, quickly growing to become mainstream. It is now more well understood around the world than it has ever been before. Some refer to it as FOSS to highlight the Freedom part of open source (Free and Open Source Software). And in 2014, at OSCON, the term "inner source" was debuted, and people started talking about how to use the principles of open source, but inside of a company. It raised several questions for those unfamiliar with the term, which I hope to answer with this article. For example, what is similar about the two, what is different, the company roles involved in the two, is inner source taking the energy away from open source, etc. These are all fair questions, and as my organization practices both and is involved in both movements, I want to take some time to share insight with this audience as a developer, as a company, and as an open source enthusiast. Read more

4 questions about AI ethics and how open source can help

As a high school student, I've become very interested in artificial intelligence (AI), which is emerging as one of the most impactful innovations of recent times. This past summer, I was selected for the AI4ALL program, where we learned how to develop AI systems using Python. For my final project, I created an object-detection program and integrated it with a virtual drone simulation. Throughout the project, I was able to use open source frameworks, including TensorFlow, Keras, Scikit-learn, and PyTorch, to aid in developing the object-detection machine learning (ML) algorithm process. Read more

MuditaOS: A Beautiful and Minimal Open Source Mobile Operating System

MuditaOS is a beautiful, minimal open-source operating system for mobile phones. Unlike other mobile phone operating systems, however, the developers behind MuditaOS are not interested in smartphones. Instead, they aim to take us to the era before the smartphone craze that has lead to distrust for big tech companies, but with a far cooler style. Developing this mobile operating system has admittedly been a challenge to the team and they are excited to have come up with a beautifully designed E Ink OS, which they have open-sourced to meet the modern user’s desire for transparency without compromising quality. When the company developed and open-source the operating system, they announced that open-sourcing the OS goes along the lines of their “You’re happy – I’m Happy” philosophy and this makes even more sense when you understand that Mudita is from the Sanskrit word “Mudit” which translates to ‘Happy‘. Read more