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Legal

Linux ZFS Compatibility

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Linux
Debian
Legal
  • ZFS comes to Debian, thanks to licensing workaround

    The ZFS file system has come to popular Linux distribution Debian, but in a way the distro's backers think won't kick up another row over compatibility of open source licences.

    Ubuntu 16.04 added ZFS, despite pre-release grumblings from Richard Stallman to the effect that anything licensed under the GNU GPL v2 can only be accompanied by code also released under the GNU GPL v2. ZFS is issued under a Common Development and Distribution License, version 1 (CDDLv1).

  • Skirting The Hole In The Ice Of ZFS

    The muddy part is how building and running a ZFS module with Linux is not a violation of copyright when a combined derivative work of Linux+ZFS is created. Making even one copy is probably a violation of both CDDL and GPL., so keep on skating.

  • What does it mean that ZFS is included in Debian?

    Petter Reinholdtsen recently blogged about ZFS availability in Debian. Many people have worked hard on getting ZFS support available in Debian and we would like to thank everyone involved in getting to this point and explain what ZFS in Debian means.

Debian Project Clarifies the Implementation of ZFS for Linux in Debian GNU/Linux

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Debian
Legal

We reported the other day that Debian developer Petter Reinholdtsen informed the community about the implementation of ZFS filesystem support in the Debian GNU/Linux operating system.

While the Debian community welcomed the native ZFS for Linux implementation in the acclaimed and widely-used GNU/Linux operating system, some were wondering how this stands from a legal point of view, as the license under which the ZFS for Linux project is distributed does not comply with the Debian Free Software Guidelines.

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FSF/GNU

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Development
GNU
Legal
  • GCC 6.1 Compiler Optimization Level Benchmarks: -O0 To -Ofast + FLTO

    Here are some extra GCC 6.1 compiler benchmarks to share this weekend, complementing the recent GCC 4.9 vs. GCC 5 vs. GCC 6 comparison and the GCC 6.1 vs. Clang 3.9 compiler comparison.

  • LinuxFest Northwest 2016: From TPP to saving WiFi, the FSF fights for you
  • Savannah suffering networking problems

    Last Friday May 6th Savannah was moved to new hosting in the same datacenter with many various assorted related and unrelated changes. Since that time there have been wide spread reports of networking problems. The FSF admins are aware of the problem and are trying to resolve it.

  • Enforcement and compliance for the GPL and similar licenses

    The Free Software Legal & Licensing Workshop (LLW) is a three-day event held every year for legal professionals (and aficionados) who work in the realm of free and open-source software (FOSS). It is organized by the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) and, this year, the event was held in Barcelona (Spain), April 13-15. The topics covered during the event ranged from determining what constitutes authorship, how to attribute it, and what is copyrightable, to the complexity of licenses and how to make them more accessible for potential licensees lacking in legal background. In addition, license enforcement and compliance were discussed, with a particular focus on how the GPL and related licenses have done in court.

FRAND Is Not A Compliance Issue

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OSS
Legal

The European Commission has been persuaded by lobbyists to change its position on standards to permit the use of FRAND license terms for patents applicable to technologies within those standards. This is a massive mistake that will harm innovation by chilling open source community engagement.

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EU jeopardises its own goals in standardisation with FRAND licensing

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OSS
Legal

On 19 April, the European Commission published a communication on "ICT Standardisation Priorities for the Digital Single Market" (hereinafter 'the Communication'). The Digital Single Market (DSM) strategy intends to digitise industries with several legislative and political initiatives, and the Communication is a part of it covering standardisation. In general, the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) welcomes the Communication's plausible approach for integrating Free Software and Open Standards into standardisation but expresses its concerns about the lack of understanding of necessary prerequisites to pursue that direction.

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Also: A fresh look at the U.S. draft policy on 'federal sourcing'

A perfect marriage: YOU and Ubuntu 16.04

Filed under
GNU
Ubuntu
Legal

Canonical claims it has taken legal advice and that it is allowed to ship OpenZFS with its Linux.

What ever the legal rights and wrongs, Ubuntu's support is clearly aimed primarily at the server use case. ZFS is not an option within the installer. In fact you'll need to install the userland parts of ZFS yourself before you can format disks and get everything working. Still, if you're interested in trying Ubuntu atop ZFS, Canonical has a guide to using ZFS.

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Anti-innovation: EU excludes open source from new tech standards

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OSS
Legal

It's no surprise that the Commission was trying to keep that particular detail quiet, because FRAND licensing—the acronym stands for "fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory"—is incompatible with open source, which will therefore find itself excluded from much of the EU's grand new Digital Single Market strategy. That's hardly a "balanced IPR policy."

The problem for open source is that standard licensing can be perfectly fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory, but would nonetheless be impossible for open source code to implement. Typically, FRAND licensing requires a per-copy payment, but for free software, which can be shared any number of times, there's no way to keep tabs on just how many copies are out there. Even if the per-copy payment is tiny, it's still a licensing requirement that open source code cannot meet.

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FSF on GPL and ZFS

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GNU
Legal

Is Source Code covered by the PSI Directive?

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OSS
Legal

Concerning France, the court decision may have a considerable impact, as the source code of any software produced by or for the various national or local administrations becomes legally “libre” or open source under no or very permissive conditions. Therefore the interest to clarify the applicable licence: when communicating it, relevant administration should then apply the EUPL or the French CeCILL, according to the 12 September 2012 prime minister Ayrault circular.

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Free 'law for Linux developers' class opens its virtual doors

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OSS
Legal

No one becomes a programmer to become an intellectual property (IP) expert. But, in today's lawsuit-happy world, with patent trolls ready to attack and licensing becoming increasingly complicated, developers needs to know some IP law.

So, at the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit, Jim Zemlin, the Linux Foundation's executive director announced the availability of Open Source Compliance Basics for Developers (LFC291), This free course is designed to provide software developers with the basic knowledge about legal and licensing issues they need for building and using open-source software.

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Games and Emulation

Linux Devices

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

  • GCC for New Contributors
    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.