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Legal

How Linux defenders attack bad software patents before they’re approved

Filed under
Linux
Legal

arstechnica.com: Despite the rise in the number of patent trolls launching lawsuits affecting open source software, there are some glimmers of hope. The America Invents Act that was signed into law in September 2011 has provided new ways to prevent the issuance of over-broad software patents that could fuel future lawsuits.

FSF, other groups join EFF to sue NSA over unconstitutional surveillance

Filed under
OSS
Security
Legal

fsf.org: The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today joined eighteen other activist and advocacy organizations in challenging the National Security Agency's (NSA) mass surveillance of telecommunications in the United States with a lawsuit filed by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF).

SCO Finally Shows its Legal Strategy Going Forward

Filed under
Legal

groklaw.net: SCO was ordered by the judge, the Hon. David Nuffer, to tell him what claims it believes survived SCO's massive loss to Novell, in order to go forward in SCO v. IBM, and it has now done so.

Ladies and Gentlemen, SCO v. IBM Is Officially Reopened

Filed under
Legal

groklaw.net: The Hon. David Nuffer has ruled on the SCO v. IBM motions, granting SCO's motion for reconsideration and reopening the case, which IBM did not object to. Judge Nuffer apologizes to the parties for the error in his previous order refusing to reopen the case.

Mark Shuttleworth takes SA government to court

Filed under
Ubuntu
Legal

mybroadband.co.za: Billionaire entrepreneur Mark Shuttleworth has taken the South African government to court to have the country’s exchange control system declared unconstitutional.

Opera quietly settles lawsuit

Filed under
Software
Legal

h-online.com: Opera's multi-million dollar lawsuit against a former employee who, it claimed, had leaked trade secrets to Mozilla has been settled. Details of the settlement are, however, confidential.

Microsoft accused of locking out Linux in EU antitrust complaint

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Legal

arstechnica.com: A Spanish group that represents open source software users has accused Microsoft of using an "obstruction mechanism" to prevent buyers of Windows 8 computers from installing Linux-based operating systems.

Also: Ultimate PC security requires UEFI

Python Settles Trademark Dispute

Filed under
Software
Legal

computerworlduk.com: The Python Software Foundation (PSF) have announced they have reached a settlement with POBox Hosting Ltd of the UK over their trademark application for the term 'Python' in connection with cloud hosting.

2012: Top Ten FOSS Legal Developments

Filed under
OSS
Legal

lawandlifesiliconvalley.com: The year 2012 had many important FOSS legal developments which reflects the continued increase in FOSS use. Continuing the tradition of looking back over top ten legal developments in FOSS my selection of the top ten issues for 2012 are as follows:

Red Hat feuds with Rising Tide Systems

Filed under
Linux
Legal

techeye.net: A row has erupted between two Linux distributors with one of them accusing the other of breaching the GPL.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Mesa's Shader Cache Will Now Occupy Less Disk Space
    Mesa previously had a hard-coded limit to not take up more than 10% of your HDD/SSD storage, but now that limit has been halved. In a change to Mesa 17.2-dev Git and primed for back-porting to Mesa 17.1, Timothy Arceri has lowered the cache size limit to 5% of the disk space. He noted in the commit, "Modern disks are extremely large and are only going to get bigger. Usage has shown frequent Mesa upgrades can result in the cache growing very fast i.e. wasting a lot of disk space unnecessarily. 5% seems like a more reasonable default."
  • Amazon EC2 Cloud Benchmarks vs. AMD Ryzen, Various AMD/Intel Systems
  • Epiphany 3.25.1 Released, Ported To Meson
    Epiphany 3.25.1 has been released as the latest update for GNOME's Web Browser in what will be part of GNOME 3.26 this September. Epiphany 3.25.1 has continued the trend by other GNOME components in porting to the Meson build system. With Epiphany 3.25.1, Meson is present and its Autotools build system has been removed.
  • Tumbleweed Snapshots Update Fonts, Perl, Python Packages
    openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week gave many newer versions of Perl and Python packages, but several other packages were updated in the repositories including some open fonts. Google and Adobe fonts were updated in snapshots 20170424 and 20170420 with google-croscore-fonts and adobe-sourcehansans-fonts being added to the repositories respectively.
  • 3 cool features in Ubuntu 17.04
    April showers bring May flowers, and fresh versions of Ubuntu too. Canonical’s latest official Ubuntu release—17.04—arrived this month after news of the death of Unity 8 and the return to the GNOME desktop in 2018. For now, Ubuntu is still shipping with its Unity desktop. I wrote earlier that most users who need stability and support over new features will probably want to stick with Ubuntu 16.04, which was released last April, until Ubuntu 18.04 arrives a year from now. However, there are a few small things in Ubuntu 17.04 that will appeal to users who are keen to get all the newest updates.
  • Linux Security and Isolation APIs course in Munich (17-19 July 2017)
    I've scheduled the first public instance of my "Linux Security and Isolation APIs" course to take place in Munich, Germany on 17-19 July 2017. (I've already run the course a few times very successfully in non-public settings.) This three-day course provides a deep understanding of the low-level Linux features (set-UID/set-GID programs, capabilities, namespaces, cgroups, and seccomp) used to build container, virtualization, and sandboxing technologies. The course format is a mixture of theory and practical.

more of today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Microsoft Begs, Bugs, and Bug Doors

  • Don't install our buggy Windows 10 Creators Update, begs Microsoft
    Microsoft has urged non-tech-savvy people – or anyone who just wants a stable computer – to not download and install this year's biggest revision to Windows by hand. And that's because it may well bork your machine. It's been two weeks since Microsoft made its Creators Update available, and we were previously warned it will be a trickle-out rather than a massive rollout. Now, Redmond has urged users to stop manually fetching and installing the code, and instead wait for it to be automatically offered to your computer when it's ready.
  • Microsoft Word flaw took so long to fix that hackers used it to send fraud software to millions of computers
    A flaw in Microsoft Word took the tech giant so long to fix that hackers were able to use it to send fraud software to millions of computers, it has been revealed. The security flaw, officially known as CVE-2017-0199, could allow a hacker to seize control of a personal computer with little trace, and was fixed on April 11 in Microsoft's regular monthly security update - nine months after it was discovered.