Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Legal

N.Y. attorney general accuses Dell of fraud

Filed under
Legal

CNET: Dell is being accused of making false promises to customers to drive sales, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday by New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo.

Also: Dell drops consumer Linux desktops?

SCO wanted gag order for Linus Torvalds, Groklaw in 2004

Filed under
Legal

According to a recently uncovered filing in the long-running SCO v. IBM case, SCO tried to have Groklaw—along with a handful of people associated with the open-source movement, like Linus Torvalds—silenced back in 2004. In a letter sent to IBM, dated February 11, 2004, one of SCO's attorneys said that the company "had been told that IBM is a sponsor of Groklaw."

American Dental Association Sues FSF, Linux Foundation over FLOSS Acronym

Filed under
Legal

The American Dental Association announced Friday that they are suing both the Free Software Foundation and the Linux Foundation over the use of the acronym FLOSS.

GNOME Foundation Retains Software Freedom Law Center

Filed under
Legal

The Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC), provider of pro-bono legal services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software, has added the GNOME Foundation as a new client.

SCO vs Groklaw's Pamela Jones

Filed under
Legal

For three and a half years, a blogger named Pamela Jones has led a relentless online crusade against software maker SCO Group. Now the Lindon, Utah, software company is fighting back by seeking to take a deposition from Jones.

Raymond, Nelson critical of new planned license for open source peripherals

Filed under
Legal

Tucson Amateur Packet Radio (TAPR) is sponsoring a plan to encourage and popularize the idea of open source -- for hardware components. The organization released a draft of an open source license for computer hardware this month, and issued a public call for comments on the draft. The new license is already drawing criticism from prominent members of the open source community.

Read more

License compliance issues could affect all BSD-derived distributions

Filed under
Legal

The Gentoo/FreeBSD project, which combines the FreeBSD kernel with Gentoo Linux design principles, is in a fix. Its lead developer, Diego "Flameeyes" Pettenò, discovered licensing issues while working on the libkvm library and the start-stop-daemon -- and Pettenò says that the problem might not be limited to his project, but could trap other BSD-derived projects as well.

IP company sues AMD over patents

Filed under
Legal

Opti, a chip-oriented intellectual property company, said it has filed a lawsuit alleging that Advanced Micro Devices violated three patents with its Opteron processors and other products.

'Grand Theft Auto' maker loses round in lawsuit

Filed under
Legal

A federal judge refused a request from Take-Two Interactive Software Inc. to immediately dismiss some claims in a lawsuit accusing it of selling "Grand Theft Auto" video games containing sexually explicit images under the wrong content label.

Judge won't delay suit between SCO, Novell

Filed under
Legal

A federal judge has refused a motion to postpone proceedings in the SCO Group's lawsuit against Novell until after next year's separate SCO-IBM trial concludes.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Debian-Based Distribution Updated With KDE 3.5 Forked Desktop

Q4OS 1.2 "Orion" is the new release that is re-based on Debian Jessie, focused on shipping its own desktop utilities and customizations, and designed to run on both old and new hardware. Read more

Atom Shell is now Electron

Atom Shell is now called Electron. You can learn more about Electron and what people are building with it at its new home electron.atom.io. Read more Also: C++ Daddy Bjarne Stroustrup outlines directions for v17

A Fedora 22 beta walk-through

The new Fedora, with its GNOME 3.16 interface, is an interesting, powerful Linux desktop. Read more Also: Web software center for Fedora Red Hat's Cross-Selling and Product Development Will Power Long-Term Growth Red Hat Updates Open Source Developer and Admin Tools

Unix and Personal Computers: Reinterpreting the Origins of Linux

So, to sum up: What Linus Torvalds, along with plenty of other hackers in the 1980s and early 1990s, wanted was a Unix-like operating system that was free to use on the affordable personal computers they owned. Access to source code was not the issue, because that was already available—through platforms such as Minix or, if they really had cash to shell out, by obtaining a source license for AT&T Unix. Therefore, the notion that early Linux programmers were motivated primarily by the ideology that software source code should be open because that is a better way to write it, or because it is simply the right thing to do, is false. Read more Also: Anti-Systemd People