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VMware wants amicable end to 'meritless' Linux-lifting lawsuit

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Linux
Legal

VMware thinks it will be possible to find an amicable resolution to the lawsuit alleging it has pinched parts of the Linux kernel.

The lawsuit was brought two weeks ago by kernel developer Christoph Hellwig, who set the ball rolling in his native Germany. Hellwig's complaint alleges VMware has combined code issued under GPLv2 with its own code into products “without providing nor offering complete, corresponding source code for that combined work under terms of the GPLv2.”

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Open Source Licensing and Community Intent

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OSS
Legal

Christoph Hellwig, supported by Software Freedom Conservancy (Conservancy), has initiated a lawsuit in Germany against VMware for alleged violations of the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2, an OSI approved license. If you aren’t following the case yet, it’s worth starting with the statements published by Conservancy, the Free Software Foundation, and VMware.

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VMware heads to court over GPL violations

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Legal

The Software Freedom Conservancy alleges that VMware is using GPL-licensed code in its proprietary products

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BREAKING NEWS: UK Government issues statement on EPO

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Legal

On behalf of Merpel and all the readers of this weblog, the IPKat wishes to thank the IPO for what, he believes, is the first public response of any national office to the current unrest. He also thanks the IPO for its willingness to answer questions from those concerned about the present situation and what he hopes will be its future resolution.

It is very much hoped that other national offices will express their willingness to do the same, whether through the medium of this weblog or through channels more appropriate to the nations concerned.

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Also: The EPO: privileged and immune says the President

Samsung, OpenChain Aim to Build Trust With Open Source Compliance

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OSS
Legal

Samsung is a top-five contributor to the Linux kernel and contributes upstream to more than 25 other open source projects. Yet the public perception that the company doesn't care about open source has persisted, despite its efforts, said Ibrahim Haddad, head of the Open Source Innovation Group at Samsung in a presentation at Collaboration Summit last week.

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CC BY 4.0 and CC BY-SA 4.0 added to our list of free licenses

Filed under
GNU
Legal

The Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International and Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International licenses are now on our list of free licenses for works of practical use besides software and documentation.

We have updated our list of Various Licenses and Comments about Them to include the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license (CC BY 4.0) and the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license (CC BY-SA 4.0). Both of these licenses are free licenses for works of practical use besides software and documentation.

CC BY 4.0 is a noncopyleft license that is compatible with the GNU General Public License version 3.0 (GPLv3), meaning you can combine a CC BY 4.0 licensed work with a GPLv3 licensed work a larger work that is then released under the terms of GPLv3.

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The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews Rainey Reitman of the Electronic Frontier Foundation

Filed under
GNU
Interviews
Legal

This is the latest installment of our Licensing and Compliance Lab's series on free software developers who choose GNU licenses for their works.

In this edition, we conducted an email-based interview with Rainey Reitman, Activism Director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, about their new EFF Alerts mobile app.

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Open Source Debate: Copyleft vs. Permissive Licenses

Filed under
GNU
OSS
Legal

Most discussions of free software licenses bore listeners. In fact, licenses are usually of such little interest that 85%of the projects on Github fail to have one.

However, one aspect of licensing never fails to stir partisan responses: the debate over the relative advantages of copyleft licenses such as the GNU General Public License (GPL), and permissive licenses such as the MIT or the Apache 2 licenses.

You only have to follow the links to Occupy GPL! that are making the rounds to see the emotions that this unending debate can still stir. Calling for an end to "GPL purism," and dismissing the GPL as "not a free license," the site calls on readers to use permissive licenses instead, describing them as "truly OSS [Open Source Software] licenses and urging readers to "Join the Fight!"

Occupy GPL! itself is unlikely to have a future. Anonymous calls to actions rarely succeed; people prefer to know who is giving the call to arms before they muster at the barricades. Nor is the site's outdated name and inconsistent diction, nor the high number of exclamation and question marks likely to inspire many readers. Still, the fact that the site exists at all, and the counter-responses in comments on Google+ show that the old debate is still very much alive.

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Good news: Compatibility of LGPLv2 and LGPLv3

Filed under
GNU
Legal

Two of the most used Free Software licenses are the GNU General Public License (GPL) and the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL). Both are copyleft licenses, meaning that you can use them as long as you do not remove the Free Software rights from downstream users. The difference is that the LGPL can be linked unto non-free software (as long as the LGPL library itself stays free), but with the GPL everything needs to be free. In 2007, the FSF published an update to both licenses, so now we have version 2 (“GPLv2” and “LGPLv2.1”) and version 3 (“GPLv3” and “LGPLv3”).

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Pondering the Fate of Open Source & Software Licenses

Filed under
OSS
OOo
Legal

Having used OpenOffice for several years on the Panasonic Toughbooks I use in the field, I've avoided buying into traditional or subscription-based services. While enterprises may have a different view on licensing, cost most always figures into the decision-making process. So if they go the subscription route, they'll have to then ask what strategies they can use to lower those costs. Will they be able to haggle on price?

If the subscription model does become the norm, will OpenOffice and other open-source software thrive, dive, or stay the same in market share? I'd like to hear your thoughts.

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More in Tux Machines

Panasonic Toughpad Rugged Tablet Muscles into Android Space

Panasonic Jan. 12 unveiled a new tablet in its Toughpad series of devices designed for the corporate world. But unlike so many other rugged Panasonic machines, the FZ-A2 doesn’t run Windows. Instead, the device is running on Google’s Android Marshmallow, an operating system not typically associated with rugged PCs and mobile devices designed for rough-and-tumble field-service work. But the FZ-A2 is just the latest model in Panasonic's expanding line of Android tablets. This new Toughpad includes several corporate-friendly features such as robust security, a hot-swappable battery and plenty of ports that allow connection to a wide range of accessories. The Toughpad is launching at a time when market reports have consistently shown a steady decline in popularity of tablets. But Panasonic says its device is coming along at the right time. This slide show will take a look at the Toughpad to see whether its features will convince field-service workers and corporate hardware buyers that the tablet really is as appealing a buy as Panasonic claims it is. Read on to learn more about Panasonic’s FZ-A2 Toughpad. Read more

LXQt Spin Proposed For Fedora 26

A new spin/flavor has been proposed for Fedora 26, one integrating the LXQt desktop environment. For those late to the party, LXQt is the formation of the LXDE and Razor-qt projects and built around the Qt5 tool-kit. Fedora currently has an LXDE spin while this proposed Fedora LXQt would continue to co-exist alongside the existing LXDE version. Christian Dersch who proposed the LXQt spin explained, "LXDE spin will exist until its maintainer will stop it, LXQt is independent from LXDE spin. So nobody is forced to change ;) Also both projects are maintained upstream so there is no reason to drop anything here." Read more Also: F26 Self Contained Change: LXQt Spin

Linux Graphics

Raspberry Pi 1 and Zero: Hands on with Manjaro ARM and PiCore Linux

In the previous two posts I wrote about SUSE Linux and Fedora/Manjaro ARM/Ubuntu MATE for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. The results were mixed, at best. This time I'm taking on even more of a challenge because I'm going to be looking at the original Raspberry Pi Model B and B+, and the Raspberry Pi Zero. These models all have much more limited CPU power and memory than the Pi 2 and 3, so it will be interesting to see what can be done with them. Read more