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Legal

IP Innovation v Red Hat and Novell - 1 Year Later

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Legal

groklaw.net: It's been a while since we last looked in on the IP Innovation LLC v. Red Hat et al patent litigation. In fact, it's been exactly a year. The parties are deep in discovery, with trial set for April 12, 2010[PDF]. That could change, of course. But that's the date set.

Apple awarded patent on the Dock

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Legal

appleinsider.com: It took nearly nine years, but Apple chief executive Steve Jobs and Co. were awarded this week with a patent for their implementation of a software-based computer dock that has since become a trademark of the Mac OS X operating system.

The Purpose of the Fifth Amendment to the Bill of Rights

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groklaw.net: I'm thinking that we need a few fun classes on the Bill of Rights to the US Constitution. No. Really. If you'll try to pay attention, I'll try to make it enjoyable.

Rule #1: Hold On Loosely

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Legal

In the proprietary production world, what matters about a copyright is who owns it. In the free production world, however, who owns a copyright is relatively unimportant. What matters is what license it is offered under. There is a very simple rule of thumb about the best license to use: use a “free, copyleft license”.

The Caldera v. Microsoft Docket - All the Documents To Be Found

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Legal

groklaw.net: Here are all the documents still electronically available from the court in the Caldera v. Microsoft litigation, which settled in 2000. Very little is available any more, mainly orders, but you can learn quite a bit from reading orders. And the docket sheet itself tells quite a tale. What I could get, I've placed as links in the list.

2000 Caldera-Microsoft Settlement Surfaces in Novell v. Microsoft Antitrust Lawsuit

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groklaw.net: The Novell/Canopy/Caldera/DR DOS story continues, and Novell and Microsoft are in the middle of it all, battling in discovery in the Novell v. Microsoft antitrust litigation -- that is the litigation over WordPerfect currently before the US District Court in Maryland in pretrial discovery.

DefCon: Restraining Order Issued; Talk Cancelled

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Security
Legal

blog.wired.com: The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority filed a suit in federal court on Friday seeking a temporary restraining order to prevent three undergraduate students from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from presenting a talk at the DefCon hacker conference this weekend about security vulnerabilities in payment systems used in the Massachusetts mass transit system.

BusyBox Developers and Supermicro Agree to End GPL Lawsuit

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Legal

softwarefreedom.org: The Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) today announced that an agreement has been reached to dismiss the GNU General Public License (GPL) enforcement lawsuit filed by SFLC against Super Micro Computer, Inc. on behalf of two principal developers of BusyBox.

SFLC Files GPL Violation Lawsuit Against Extreme Networks

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softwarefreedom.org: The Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) today announced that it has filed a copyright infringement lawsuit against Extreme Networks, Inc. on behalf of its clients, two principal developers of BusyBox, alleging violation of the GNU General Public License (GPL).

Judge Kimball Rules at Last

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Legal

groklaw.net: Judge Kimball rules in SCO v. Novell! I haven't read it yet myself, just quickly skimmed it enough to see that SCO owes Novell some money ($2,547,817 plus interest probably -- SCO can oppose -- from the Sun agreement) and it had no right to enter into the Sun agreement.

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