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MongoDB and Amazon Licence Battles

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OSS
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  • Red Hat drops MongoDB out of Satellite

    Red Hat is prising MongoDB out of its Satellite infrastructure management platform in favour of PostgreSQL.

    The open source vendor made the announcement in a blog post yesterday saying it would “standardize on a PostgreSQL backend” and that it wanted to ensure users “were not caught by surprise as this is a change to the underlying databases of Satellite”.

    “No specific timing or release is being communicated at this time. At this point we’re simply hoping to raise awareness of the change that is coming to help users of Satellite prepare for the removal of MongoDB,” it added.

  • Google Cloud's new CEO used his first public talk to throw shade at Amazon over its feud with open source startups

    Amazon has a habit of taking free software created by other companies and selling it on its cloud. But Google Cloud isn't like that, new CEO Thomas Kurian says.

    At his inaugural appearance as the new CEO of Google Cloud on Tuesday, Kurian spoke about how Google Cloud allows customers to use a variety of open source tools to build applications on its cloud.

    Many of these tools are developed by other startups and made available as open source, meaning that they are free for anyone to use, download, modify — and even sell, something that Amazon Web Services frequently does.

Free Software Foundation Europe Calls for Open Source 5G License

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OSS
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The Free Software Foundation Europe has said the recent controversy surrounding Huawei shows governments and consumers don’t trust tech giants. However, FSFE believes one potential fix would be for companies to publish code through the Free and Open Source Software license.

Huawei has been a long-time target of regulators around the world. The company is believed to be using its technology to backdoor spy for the Chinese government. There is an ongoing debate around Huawei’s 5G networks and concerns over privacy.

Canada could block Huawei 5G and the Chinese government has responded. It seems China suspects Huawei will be blocked, and the country’s ambassador said Ottawa will face repercussions if a bad is imposed.

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FOSS Licensing/Legal Disputes

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Linux Kernel: Btrfs/Zstd and Licensing Questions

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Linux
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  • Configurable Zstd Compression Level Support Is Revived For Btrfs

    Since the Linux 4.14 kernel Btrfs has supported Zstd for transparent file-system compression while a revived patch-set would allow that Zstd compression level to become configurable by the end-user.

    Facebook, which is behind Zstandard and also the employer for several key Btrfs developers, started off on the Zstd compression level support for Btrfs previously. This would allow users to use a higher compression level to achieve greater compression but at the cost of increased memory usage and obviously more resource intensive or opt for lower compression.

  • VMware GPL case is back in court—will we finally get some clarity on the meaning of "derivative work"?

    One of the most active Linux kernel developers, Christoph Hellwig, backed by the Software Freedom Conservancy, (unsurprisingly perhaps) has struck again against a virtualisation giant—VMware. for breaching the GNU General Public Licence (GPL). More than two years after the Hamburg District Court’s dismissal, an appeal has been filed in the German Court of Appeal. This case has attracted a worldwide attention because the claims raised call for court’s interpretation of the scope of the GPL applicability and, in particular, the reach of its copyleft effect.

    [...]

    The notion of a derivative work in a GPL context has been a big unknown for nearly two decades. Such uncertainty and potential risk of having to open-source proprietary code has led many commercial entities and open source projects to refrain from including a GPL’ed software in their codebase. 

    Hellwig v VMware might become a gamechanger, if it provides for the first time much-anticipated judicial clarity as to what implications software architecture has for licence interpretation and how copyright law fits in. That said, given the wide diversity of the structure of software is built and how it is distributed any decision in this case will not likely be the last word.

  • Google v. Oracle – Supreme Court Petition

    After reading the Federal Circuit decision, I wrote that the case is “likely heading to the Supreme Court.”  Although I believe that the case has a very good shot – one difficulty is that it involves a decision by the Federal Circuit applying Ninth Circuit law — it effectively holds no weight and can be simply rejected by the next Ninth Circuit panel addressing the same issues.

‘It's Frankly Great for Us’: MongoDB CEO Welcomes Amazon Rivalry

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Amazon’s move follows competition from Microsoft and further validates MongoDB’s approach to the database market, which is centered on documents rather than tables, according to Ittycheria. Furthermore, he sees Amazon’s service as antiquated with about a third of the features that MongoDB has.

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MongoDB and Server Side Public License (SSPL) Controversy in the News This Past Week

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Red Hat
OSS
Legal
  • Red Hat Drops MongoDB Over License

    MongoDB's attempts to make some money from its NoSQL database have hit another snag as Red Hat has now dropped it from its Enterprise Linux distribution.

    This is the latest in a sequence of moves and countermoves that started when MongoDB changed its license terms to use a Server Side Public License (SSPL) that explicitly says that if a company wanted to reuse and rebadge its database, explicitly to offer MongoDB as a service, then that company either needs to buy a commercial license or to open source the service.

  • Why more may be the wrong measure of open source contributions
  • Battle Of The Document Databases

    Cloud providers can be like sharks in that they have to keep moving forward – in their case, growing the number of services they can offer enterprises – or be overtaken by competitors.

    That need to continually grow the service portfolio isn’t going to go away any time soon. Cloud adoption is accelerating, moving past the early adopter stage and into what Paul Teich, principal analyst with Liftr Cloud Insights and a contributor here at The Next Platform, calls the “early majority” phase, and enterprises are moving forward with strategies that involve leveraging more than one public cloud provider.

    At the same time, the pile of data being generated by organizations is growing rapidly – and the cloud is becoming the place to collect, store, process, and analyze much of that data – but only a portion of enterprise workloads – about 20 percent – are being run in the cloud. That means that four out of five are still run in on-premises environments, so there is still a lot of applications that need to make their way from behind the firewall and into the cloud.

  • What Does Open Source Mean in the Era of Cloud APIs?

    One of the most interesting and unsurprising characteristics of conversations with organizations that have adopted one of the emerging hybrid or “non-compete” style of licenses is that they are universally insistent on being differentiated from one another. Which is understandable on the one hand, given that there are major structural differences between the Commons Clause and the SSPL, to pick two recent examples. Whether it’s reasonable to expect a market which by and large has little appetite for the nuances of different licensing approaches to care is, of course, a separate question.

    What is perhaps more interesting, however, is a central, foundational assumption that every member of this category of licenses shares. On the surface, examples like the Business Source License, the Cockroach Community License, the Commons Clause, the Confluent Community License, the Fair Source License, the TimeScale license or the SSPL would seem to have little in common. Some have ambitions to be considered open source, some do not but invoke open source-like terminology, and some are unambiguously and unapologetically proprietary. Some merely require contributions back copyleft-style, some prohibit usage within prescribed business models (read: cloud) and others restrict business usage without distinction. And so on; while typically rolled up and discussed as a category, they are no more unified in their intent and purpose than open source licenses broadly.

Server Side Public License (SSPL), Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
OSS
Legal
  • Red Hat/Fedora decide MongoDB’s SSLP doesn’t fit

    MongoDB’s January blues deepened this week as the team behind the Red Hat-backed Fedora Linux distribution confirmed it had added the open source database’s Server Side Public License to its “bad”list.

    The move came as it emerged Red Hat – Fedora’s sponsor – had nixed MongoDB support in RHEL 8.0.

  • AWS Raised Its Hand Lest Of Open Source Platform

    Even though AWS stands by MongoDB as the best the customers find it difficult to build and vastly accessible applications on the open-source platform can range from multiple terabytes to hundreds of thousands of reads and writes per second. Thus, the company built its own document database with an Apache 2.0 open source MongoDB 3.6 API compatibility. The open-sources politics are quite difficult to grasp. AWS has been blamed for taking the top open-source projects and re-branding plus re-using it without providing the communities. The catch here is that MongoDB was the company behind putting a halt to the re-licensing of the open-source tools under a novel license that clearly stated the companies willing to do this will have to purchase a commercial license.

  • Red Hat gets heebie-jeebies over MongoDB's T&Cs squeeze: NoSQL database dropped from RHEL 8B over license

    MongoDB justified its decision last October to shift the free version of its NoSQL database software, MongoDB Community Server, from the open-source GNU Affero General Public License to the not-quite-so-open Server Side Public License (SSPL) by arguing that cloud providers sell open-source software as a service without giving back.

    The following month, and not widely noticed until this week, Red Hat said it would no longer include MongoDB in version 8 of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The removal notice came in the release notes for Red Hat Enterprise Linux Beta 8.0.

    Under section 4.7, the release notes say, "Note that the NoSQL MongoDB database server is not included in RHEL 8.0 Beta because it uses the Server Side Public License (SSPL)."

  • Server Side Public License struggles to gain open-source support

    MongoDB first announced the release of the new software license in October as a way to protect itself and other open-source projects like it from being taken advantage of by larger companies for monetary gain.

    At the time, MongoDB co-founder and CTO Eliot Horowitz explained: “This should be a time of incredible opportunity for open source. The revenue generated by a service can be a great source of funding for open-source projects, far greater than what has historically been available. The reality, however, is that once an open-source project becomes interesting, it is too easy for large cloud vendors to capture most of the value while contributing little or nothing back to the community.”

    Other open-source businesses have developed their own licenses or adopted others in recent months, citing the same issues. However, the problem with these new licenses is that if they are not approved by the Open Source Initiative (OSI), an organization created to promote and protect the open-source ecosystem, the software behind the license is technically not considered open source, and it will have a hard time getting acceptance from members in the community.

  • Open source has a problem with monetization, not AWS
  • Why you should take notice of the open source in enterprise suckers conundrum

    In the MongoDB case, AWS is widely regarded as responding to a licensing change MongoDB made in October 2018 that has caused something of a stir among the open source cognoscenti.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-03

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

    I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

ZFS On Linux Landing Workaround For Linux 5.0 Kernel Support

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Last week I reported on ZFS On Linux breaking with Linux 5.0 due to some kernel symbols sought by this out-of-tree file-system driver no longer being exported and the upstream developers not willing to adjust for the ZoL code. That's still the case but the ZFS On Linux developers have a patch so at least the file-system driver will be able to build on Linux 5.0.

This ZOL + Linux 5.0 issue stems from a set of functions used by this ZFS Linux port for vectorized file-system checksums no longer being exported. The kernel developers don't want to re-export the functionality since as Greg Kroah-Hartman put it, "my tolerance for ZFS is pretty non-existant."

Since that Phoronix article last week, Greg KH followed up on the mailing list with, "Sorry, no, we do not keep symbols exported for no in-kernel users." Longtime Linux kernel developer Christoph Hellwig also suggested users switch instead to FreeBSD if caring about ZFS.

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Some More Attacks on the GPL and Latest Compliance Story

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GNU
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  • GPL Cooperation Commitment: Promise of Collaborative Interpretation [Ed: IP Kat perpetuates the Microsoft-connected (and funded) lie that GPL "popularity has dropped dramatically during the past decade," citing Jono Bacon and Microsoft-funded 'analysts', proxies like Black Duck. To this date, in light of the GitHub takeover, Microsoft managers are badmouthing the GPL and many anti-GPL 'studies' are based on this Microsoft site alone.]

    GNU General Public Licence version 2 (GPLv2) was written in the early nineties to ensure compliant distribution of copyleft-licensed software. Even though its popularity has dropped dramatically during the past decade, it nevertheless continues to be one of the most widely used and important open source licences.

    Notedly, GPLv2 was drafted by non-legal free (as in “free speech,” not as in “free beer”) software enthusiasts and yet it has necessitated legal interpretation and application in accordance with IP and contract law principles. For nearly two decades, compliance and enforceability of the licence by its users has had to deal with ambiguity and uncertainty with respect to its terms.

  • HMD releases source code for Nokia 8 Sirocco

    HMD has released the source code for Nokia 8 Sirocco and it is now available for download on the official Nokia website.

Fedora Decides To Not Allow SSPLv1 Licensed Software Into Its Repositories

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Red Hat
Server
OSS
Legal

Back in October, MongoDB announced the Server Side Public License v1 (SSPLv1) as their new license moving forward for this document-oriented database server over their existing AGPL code. SSPL was met with much controversy upon its unveiling and Fedora's legal team has now ruled it an invalid free software license for packaged software in its repositories.

The intent of MongoDB developing the Server Side Public License was to ensure that public cloud vendors and other companies using their software as a service are giving back to the community / the upstream project. SSPL v1 was based on the GPLv3 but lays clear that a company publicly offering the SSPL-licensed software as a service must in turn open-source their software that it uses to offer said service. That stipulation applies only to organizations making use of MongoDB for public software services.

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More in Tux Machines

Bare-Metal Kubernetes Servers and SUSE Servers

  • The Rise of Bare-Metal Kubernetes Servers
    While most instances of Kubernetes today are deployed on virtual machines running in the cloud or on-premises, there is a growing number of instances of Kubernetes being deployed on bare-metal servers. The two primary reasons for opting to deploy Kubernetes on a bare- metal server over a virtual machine usually are performance and reliance on hardware accelerators. In the first instance, an application deployed at the network edge might be too latency-sensitive to tolerate the overhead created by a virtual machine. AT&T, for example, is working with Mirantis to deploy Kubernetes on bare-metal servers to drive 5G wireless networking services.
  • If companies can run SAP on Linux, they can run any application on it: Ronald de Jong
    "We have had multiple situations with respect to security breaches in the last couple of years, albeit all the open source companies worked together to address the instances. As the source code is freely available even if something goes wrong, SUSE work closely with open source software vendors to mitigate the risk", Ronald de Jong, President of -Sales, SUSE said in an interview with ET CIO.
  • SUSE Public Cloud Image Life-cycle
    It has been a while since we published the original image life-cycle guidelines SUSE Image Life Cycle for Public Cloud Deployments. Much has been learned since, technology has progressed, and the life-cycle of products has changed. Therefore, it is time to refresh things, update our guidance, and clarify items that have led to questions over the years. This new document serves as the guideline going forward starting February 15th, 2019 and supersedes the original guideline. Any images with a date stamp later than v20190215 fall under the new guideline. The same basic principal as in the original guideline applies, the image life-cycle is aligned with the product life-cycle of the product in the image. Meaning a SLES image generally aligns with the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server life-cycle and a SUSE Manager image generally aligns with the SUSE Manager life-cycle.

Steam's Slipping Grip and Release of Wine-Staging 4.2

  • Steam's iron grip on PC gaming is probably over even if the Epic Games Store fails
     

    It doesn’t matter though. Whether Epic succeeds or not, Steam has already lost. The days of Valve’s de facto monopoly are over, and all that matters is what comes next.

  • Wine-Staging 4.2 Released - Now Less Than 800 Patches Atop Upstream Wine
    Wine 4.2 debuted on Friday and now the latest Wine-Staging release is available that continues carrying hundreds of extra patches re-based atop upstream Wine to provide various experimental/testing fixes and other feature additions not yet ready for mainline Wine.  Wine-Staging for a while has been carrying above 800 patches and at times even above 900, but with Wine-Staging 4.2 they have now managed to strike below the 800 patch level. It's not that they are dropping patches, but a lot of the Wine-Staging work has now been deemed ready for mainline and thus merged to the upstream code-base. A number of patches around the Windows Codecs, NTDLL, BCrypt, WineD3D, and other patches have been mainlined thus now coming in at a 798 patch delta.

OSS Leftovers

  • Tomorrow is Good: #Freethemodels: we need open source energy models
    The transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy is arguably the biggest operation in human history. But it’s increasingly based on secret models with a bad track record. That has to change! For me, this journey started in 2007 (Dutch link). I was doing some research in my spare time and it struck me that solar, wind and electric vehicles were on course to become cheaper than fossil alternatives. What struck me even more, was that the predictions of ‘authoritative’ institutions like the International Energy Agency and the Energy Information Administration seemed to ignore this development. At first, it seemed unrelated to my work in computers, the Internet and mobile phones. Then I realized the similarity: I had been ‘fighting’ with ‘trusted experts’ in Telecom for the past 15 years. They had been denying the future of PCs, the Internet and mobile phones all through my career. The lesson I take from this: experts of the old cannot fathom the new.
  • Google open-sources PlaNet, an AI agent that learns about the world from images
    Reinforcement learning — a machine learning training technique that uses rewards to drive AI agents toward certain goals — is a reliable means of improving said agents’ decision-making, given plenty of compute, data, and time. But it’s not always practical; model-free approaches, which aim to get agents to directly predict actions from observations about their world, can take weeks of training. Model-based reinforcement learning is a viable alternative — it has agents come up with a general model of their environment they can use to plan ahead. But in order to accurately forecast actions in unfamiliar surroundings, those agents have to formulate rules from experience. Toward that end, Google in collaboration with DeepMind today introduced the Deep Planning Network (PlaNet) agent, which learns a world model from image inputs and leverages it for planning. It’s able to solve a variety of image-based tasks with up to 5,000 percent the data efficiency, Google says, while maintaining competitiveness with advanced model-free agents.
  • eLife invests in Texture to provide open-source content production tools for publishers
    Originally created by Substance Software GmbH (Substance) as a JavaScript library of tools for web-based content editing, Texture has been supported by a community of organisations collectively known as the Substance Consortium and including Érudit, the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) and SciELO. eLife has now invested in Texture's development to support its own open-source publishing platform, but - as with the organisation's other open-source projects - any new features will be added to the tool in such a way that they can be repurposed by other publishers.
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Principled GraphQL
    GraphQL is quickly becoming the preferred approach for working with APIs. It is a query language for APIs, and is designed to give users more insight and understanding into the data inside their APIs. According to GraphQL platform provider Apollo, it’s also so much more than a query language. “It’s a comprehensive solution to the problem of connecting modern apps to services in the cloud. As such, it forms the basis for a new and important layer in the modern application development stack: the data graph. This new layer brings all of a company’s app data and services together in one place, with one consistent, secure, and easy-to-use interface, so that anyone can draw upon it with minimal friction,” the company wrote.
  • Open source your automation testing for the mobile web with OpenTest
    Testing is a crucial part of the development cycle. How else will we find out if that cool new idea actually works in practice? Entering a crowded field, OpenTest offers developers a new tool for standardizing functional tests across a wide variety of platforms and teams. OpenTest is an open source functional test automation tool for web applications, mobile apps and APIs. With a wide variety of features and a focus on mainstream testing practices, OpenTest gives developers a spectacular foundation to evaluate their applications for the mobile web. What’s more, it is an easy to use tool for beginners as well as experts.
  • Facebook Open-Sources PyText NLP Modeling Framework
    Facebook AI Research is open-sourcing PyText, a natural-language-processing (NLP) modeling framework that is used in the Portal video-calling device and M Suggestions in Facebook Messenger. NLP is a technology for parsing and handling human languages and is a key component of chatbot or smart-assistant applications. Engineers developing NLP algorithms often turn to deep-learning systems to build their solutions, such as Facebook's PyTorch platform. PyText builds on top of PyTorch by providing a set of interfaces and models specifically tuned for NLP. Internally, Facebook is using PyText to power NLP in their Portal video-calling device and in their Messenger app's M Suggestion feature.
  • Fasttoken Is Making Its Codes Open Source
    One of the most common problems facing the Ethereum blockchain is scaling. While Ethereum has seen its fair share of proposed scaling solutions, state channels appear to be the best solution so far. State channels are a form of block communication that occurs outside of the blockchain and can be used to support greater scalability. And that’s not in the distant future – state channels are already available.
  • Novel Software May Help Detect Heart Diseases: Study
    Researchers have developed a new software that could spot potentially lethal heart diseases and may lead to improvements in prevention and treatment, says a new study. The software - ElectroMap - which measures electrical activity in the organ, is a new open-source software for processing, analysis and mapping complex cardiac data.
  • This new software reads cardiac data, can predict risk of heart disease
    The ElectroMap software is an open-source software for processing, analysis and mapping complex cardiac data, said experts at the University of Birmingham Dubai.  The heart's pumping ability is controlled by electrical activity that triggers the heart muscle cells to contract and relax.  In certain heart diseases such as arrhythmia, the organ's electrical activity is affected.  Cardiac researchers can already record and analyse the heart's electrical behaviour using optical and electrode mapping, but widespread use of these technologies is limited by a lack of appropriate software, according to the study published in the journal Scientific Reports.
  • Gadgetbridge is an open-source replacement for the Android app of Pebble, Mi Band, Amazfit, and other smart bands
    Purchasing a Smart Band or a smart wrist-based fitness tracker means that you not only purchase a product, but you also purchase yourself into an ecosystem of services controlled by the manufacturer. The functionality that is present on your smart band flows to you through the manufacturer, meaning that your data always goes through one extra pair of hands than is required. For most smart bands, you have to create an account with the manufacturer and continue tracking your activity and data through the manufacturer’s app — something that may not appeal to everyone in this privacy-conscious world. Enter Gadgetbridge, an open-source app that focuses on removing the manufacturer out of the equation.
  • The Pros and Cons of Open Source Cloud Computing
    Open source software is becoming increasingly more common in the technology world. True to its name, the underlying base of open source software is available for its users to study and tinker with. As such, dedicated userbases for open source technology have propped up to provide resources, updates, and technical help for open source programs.
  • You Can Now Use Open-Source Machine Learning Tools In Your Ableton Sessions
    Despite having become buzzwords in music technology over the last few years, it has often felt like “artificial intelligence” and “machine learning” were experiments taking place in secluded computer labs or only with established musicians. The tools that promised to revolutionize the way we make music never seemed to trickle down to the “we” of your regular bedroom producer. Magenta Studio might be set to change all that. Developed by the Google AI team and first showed at Ableton Loop in Los Angeles last year, Magenta is now available standalone and on Ableton (both Mac and Windows), giving you the chance to experiment with the powerful data analysis that machine learning provides.
  • 5 Open-source ML Tools You Can Use Without Coding
    As the demand for machine learning and artificial intelligence goes up, leading tech giants realised the need to give developers access to tools to build and deploy models. From the industrial perspective, there aren’t enough skilled programmers and data scientists within the industry to develop these systems. Tech giants are now open sourcing their platforms and developer tools to lower the barrier for entry in AI/ML. In this article, we list down 5 such tools that are making ML and AI accessible: Lobe:Lobe is an easy-to-use visual mechanism that lets users to build custom deep learning models, promptly train them, and ship them immediately in a user desired app without writing any code. Users can begin by dragging in a folder of training examples from there desktop. Lobe automatically builds its users a custom deep learning model and starts training. User can export the trained model and ship it directly in their app.
  • Healthcare Design Studio Publishes Open Source Health Finance Visualization
    “The Healthscape visualization serves two purposes. The first is to provide the public and professionals interested in the healthcare space a way to increase understanding and explore how all the pieces fit together. The second is to give providers, patient advocacy groups, health policymakers, and health economists a visual communication tool to discuss issues at the higher health systems level,” said Juhan Sonin, director of GoInvo.
  • HUAWEI's open source WATCH GT smartwatch is coming to America
    The company is hoping American consumers will also be interested in its wearables, as today, it reveals the previously announced HUAWEI WATCH GT is finally coming to America. While not the company's first smartwatch to hit the USA, it is definitely the most intriguing. It runs an open source operating system called LiteOS, and battery life can apparently reach two weeks. No, that is not a typo -- two weeks! It focuses heavily on health -- it can monitor fitness and sleep. Best of all, it is compatible with both iOS and Android, so it won't lock you into either platform.
  • Argonne’s Innovative Community Software Is on Weather Scientists’ Radar
    In 2015, the Python-ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART) made its open-source debut. After 4 years, and with contributions from 34 individual editors, it is now a staple in radar science. The toolkit helps scientists analyze radar data to improve models of the Earth’s systems; its growth illustrates the power of community software. Py-ART is an architecture for working with radar data in the Python programming language. It ingests data from a wide variety of atmospheric radars to produce visualizations that enable users to draw meaningful conclusions. Institutions across the world — including the National Weather Service, MeteoSwiss, IBM and the University of Illinois — use Py-ART to organize and analyze radar data. [...] Inspired by Py-ART’s success, scientists have launched the OpenRadar Partnership, an informal collaboration across Europe, Canada and the United States on open-source radar software education and inter-compatibility.
  • Furnace turns up heat on data streaming apps
  • Furnace – New, Serverless, Open Source Platform -- Lets Developers Create Advanced, Data-Intensive Apps In Hours, Not Months
  • Why Use Open Source to Gain More Visibility into Network Monitoring
  • 8 Free & Best Open source bare metal hypervisors (Foss)
  • Open Robotics turns its focus to ROS 2.0
    Open Robotics, previously known as the Open Source Robotics Foundation, is pouring its development efforts into rewriting the core of the Robot Operating System (ROS) 1.0 this year. ROS has been around since 2007, and while version 1.0 is already being used in a number of different applications and solutions, the robotics industry is changing and Open Robotics is determined to see that the technology changes with it. Despite its name, ROS is not exactly an operating system. It is a collection of software libraries and tools used to develop robot applications. According to Brian Gerkey, CEO of Open Robotics, when the organization first started working on ROS, many of the robotics solutions already available were in the form of traditional robot arms used in factories or in such things as floor-cleaning robots for consumers. “Since that time we’ve seen an explosion of products in other domains, especially mobile robots that do everything from transport goods, to provide facility security, to entertain. And of course we’ve seen the impossible to ignore trend of investment and advancement in autonomous vehicles,” he said. The ongoing evolution of the robotics industry, and the need for more advanced solutions, is what led Open Robotics to rethink the core system.
  • MITRE Announces Compass™, a New Open-Source Application to Collect Common Oncology Data
  • New geometric model improves predictions of fluid flow in rock
    "Relationships once thought to be inherently history-dependent can now be reconsidered based on rigorous geometric theory," McClure said. The team used the open source Lattice Boltzmann for Porous Media (LBPM) code, developed by McClure and named for the statistics-driven lattice Boltzmann method that calculates fluid flow across a range of scales more rapidly than calculations using finite methods, which are most accurate at small scales. The LBPM code, which uses Titan's GPUs to speed fluid flow simulations, is released through the Open Porous Media Initiative, which maintains open-source codes for the research community.
  • Over 16,000 bugs later, Google’s fuzz tester is now open source
    Here comes another tool open sourced by Google! This time, security and testing take the center stage. ClusterFuzz helps find bugs in your software so you can exterminate them with its scalable fuzzing infrastructure. Open sourced on February 7, 2019, this service focuses on stability and security. ClusterFuzz already has some impressive numbers to brag about. So far, it found over 16,000 bugs in Chrome, as well as over 11,000 bugs in open source projects integrated with OSS-Fuzz. If you use Chrome as your browser of choice, then you owe some of your experience to ClusterFuzz. Now you too can harness that power for good and keep your own projects secure and bug-free. As always, it is a great plus to all developers when a useful tool gets open sourced. Contributing to open source is becoming the new normal, with even large organizations getting on board. Hopefully FOSS will continue to grow and help break down silos.
  • Continuous Fuzzing for all? Google open sources ClusterFuzz bug hunter
    Google has open sourced ClusterFuzz, a scalable fuzzing infrastructure project that has already helped to get rid of more than 16,000 Chrome bugs. It is also the tool used for Google’s Oss-Fuzz initiative, which aims at helping maintainers of open source projects get their project as ready to deal with anything users throw at it as possible – an offer over 160 projects have accepted in the last two years. Fuzzing is a sort of testing approach which confronts a system with random inputs to help developers to find security flaws and unexpected behaviour.  ClusterFuzz has been written to offer fuzzing at scale and in a continuous manner, which is why Google claims to have it running on over 25,000 cores for Chrome. There it is integrated into the development workflow and provides users with a web interface for managing and viewing crashes caused during testing. To ensure no issue goes unnoticed, it also includes automatic bug filing and closing for the Monorail issue tracker.
  • Rubrik Launches Open Source Community Called Build
    Rubrik announced an open source community, Rubrik Build, which aims to simplify improvement of existing projects and ease creation of applications, automation tooling, and integrations. It’s based on a set of APIs providing pre-built use cases, quick-start guides, and integrations with popular tooling. A goal is inclusion. “Many people in the tech community do not come from a traditional software engineering background, and this can make contributing to open source seem daunting,” Rubrik Principal Technologist Rebecca Fitzhugh told SDxCentral. “The goal of Rubrik Build is to break down these barriers so anyone can contribute to a project.”
  • Rubrik just launched an open source community
    Rubrik just announced Rubrik Build, a new 100 percent public, 100 percent Open Source community built around use cases and integrations that consume Rubrik APIs. As part of Rubrik Build, contributors can leverage existing software development kits, tools, and use cases or contribute their own ideas, code, documentation, and feedback. The goal of Rubrik Build to establish a community around consuming Rubrik's world-class APIs to quickly get started with pre-built use cases, quick start guides, and integrations with popular tooling. The Build program was designed with customers in mind, easing their transition to consuming APIs.
  • A former Marine explains how her service helped prepare her to lead a new open source initiative for $3.3 billion startup Rubrik
     

    The idea, says Fitzhugh, is to encourage an open source ecosystem to flourish around Rubrik, though the company's main offering is not offered as open source.  

  • The Internet Was Built on the Free Labor of Open Source Developers. Is That Sustainable?
     

    In a recent interview with New Left Review, Stallman described how MIT’s AI lab fostered a culture of collaboration and radical openness to the point where the lab’s giant computer wasn’t protected with passwords and the doors to the lab were always unlocked. To be sure, Stallman acknowledged that some of this culture of openness was a product of circumstance: Minsky, for instance, was always losing his door keys and the researchers in the lab couldn’t help but share the room-sized computer because it was the only one. Nevertheless, the spirit of the lab made an impression on Stallman.  

    In 1983, he posted a message to a Usenet group—basically a proto-forum—in which he declared his intention to create an operating system and “give it away free to everyone who can use it.” Stallman called the operating system GNU, a recursive acronym for “Gnus Not Unix,” a challenge to the dominant proprietary OS of the time—Unix, which was used internally at Bell Labs—embedded in its very name.  

    GNU was the opening salvo in the free software movement, whose principles Stallman summarized in the 1985 GNU Manifesto: “I consider that the Golden Rule requires that if I like a program I must share it with other people who like it. Software sellers want to divide the users and conquer them, making each user agree not to share with others. I refuse to break solidarity with other users in this way.”  

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  • Open-Source Biology and Biohacking Hack Chat
    Justin Atkin‘s name might not ring a bell, but you’ve probably seen his popular YouTube channel The Thought Emporium, devoted to regular doses of open source science. Justin’s interests span a wide range, literally from the heavens above to the microscopic world. His current interest is to genetically modify yeast to produce spider silk, and to perhaps even use the yeast for brewing beer. He and the Thought Emporium team have been busy building out a complete DIY biology lab to support the effort, and have been conducting a variety of test experiments along the way.

FOSS in Networking: O-RAN Alliance, AT&T, OMEC/ONF

  • The Telecoms.com Podcast: Europe, Huawei, O-RAN & Legere
    They move on, inevitably, to Huawei and its ongoing drama, before concluding with a look at the growing O-RAN Alliance and the unique qualities of T-Mobile US boss John Legere.
  • AT&T Building 5G Network on an Open Source Foundation
    "We made a big bet that open source was the right way to go," Ryan Van Wyk, AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) associate VP, network cloud software engineering, tells Light Reading. And that bet paid off handsomely, he says. AT&T last week described a substantial, multi-year project to build its 5G network on a cloud based on Kubernetes and OpenStack. The telco has implemented OpenStack on Kubernetes in more than 20 regions to date, with more to come. (See AT&T Inks '8-Figure' Kubernetes & OpenStack 5G Deal With Mirantis.)
  • AT&T signed an '8-digit' deal that isn't good news for VMware, Cisco, or Huawei — but could be great for Google Cloud
    AT&T is in the midst of an ambitious project called Airship that could have sweeping implications for the $350 billion telecom equipment industry. Late last week, AT&T signed an "8-figure," three-year deal with a company called Mirantis. According to Mirantis, the company will help AT&T build out and manage the infrastructure it needs for its 5G network. Airship means that if you want to build a cloud, specialized hardware and software from vendors like VMware, Cisco, Juniper, and Huawei are unnecessary, Mirantis' cofounder and chief marketing officer, Boris Renski, tells us.
  • ONF to address CSPs’ Core issues with new open source projects
    Taking at a look at OMEC first, the ONF envisages it as a high performance, scalable, open source mobile core platform. It is being established under the CORD project umbrella in collaboration with Sprint (there are plenty of “umbrellas” in the open source community, and let’s not forget that the ONF is a member of the Linux Foundation). CORD, incidentally, is an acronym for Central Office Re-architected as a Datacenter – an ONF project that combines NFV and SDN with the elasticity of commodity clouds to bring datacenter economics and the traditional telco Central Office. The OMEC project is intended to become an open source production grade Evolved Packet Core (EPC). OMEC is being built using an NFV architecture that is optimised for Intel platforms and has reportedly already been tested for scale. It is 3GPP Release-13 compatible, features a DPDK-based data plane to support large subscriber numbers (hence the Intel connection), and provides full connectivity, billing and charging capabilities. It is also designed for lightweight and cost-effective deployments, including IoT and edge applications.
  • ONF and Sprint Launch Open Evolved Mobile Core (OMEC) Open Source Project
    ONF, the recognized leader driving transformation of the networking industry through collaborative development of open source platforms, today announced the launch of Open Mobile Evolved Core (OMEC), an industry-first high performance scalable open source Mobile Core platform.  ONF, in collaboration with Sprint, is launching OMEC under the CORD® project umbrella.  The project is intended to become an open source production grade Evolved Packet Core (EPC).