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Humor

Dominitrix Linux TV ad

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Linux
Humor

Possibly the Funniest Programming Joke Ever

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Humor

junauza.com: Maybe some of you have already heard or read about this one because it's rather old, but just to relive the fun, here it goes.

Conan O'Brien talks to the co-creator of USB on The Tonight Show

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Humor

engadget.com: Remember those Intel "rock star" ads -- featuring the co-creator of USB, Ajay Bhatt? Of course you do. Conan O'Brien felt compelled to sit down with the actual Ajay and pick his brain about technology... and, er, other things.

Google easter eggs: 15 best hidden jokes

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Google
Humor

telegraph.co.uk: Google loves to slip in-jokes and hidden features known as "easter eggs" into its products. Here are 15 of our favourites.

20 most bizarre Craigslist adverts of all time

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Web
Humor

telegraph.co.uk: Craigslist, the anarchic classifieds website, has developed a reputation for hosting some of the oddest adverts on the internet.

Walt Disney's Air Linux

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Humor

fastcompany.com: Nothing in the rule books says a penguin can't play basketball! Tim's ragtag middle-school basketball team doesn't have a chance at the playoffs. That is, until his friend Linux comes along!

Physics for Programmers

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Humor

matthewhelmke.net: 1. An object in motion tends to stay in motion
There is no such thing as a temporary program.

11 Undocumented Features Of Google Chrome OS

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OS
Google
Humor

woot.com: 1. Your family photos are accompanied by text ads for skin care and diet plans.

3. Every month, the hard drive is automatically defragged and investigated for anti-trust violations.

Seven Reasons Why Beef Is Not Ready For The Dinner Table

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Humor

penguinpetes.com: Despite its many advocates, whenever I buy some beef and try it, I always end up going back to chicken. Chicken has what I want, and beef doesn't. The latest releases of beef got my hopes up, but I was again disappointed.

Announcing A New Linux Distro: BaitNSwitch Linux

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Linux
Humor

daniweb.com/blogs: Today, I'm announcing my new Linux company, HookLineNSinker, Inc. which will produce a new commercial Linux distribution: Pricey Linux. HLNS products include Pricey Linux Enterprise, Pricey Linux Small Business Server and The Pricey Linux Desktop. BaitNSwitch Linux is the distribution where we test out new features, versions and options.

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More in Tux Machines

Review: BunsenLabs Helium

I have got a bit of soft spot for Openbox. I like how minimalist it is and how it hardly uses any system resources - according to my Conky panel BunsenLabs was using just over 200MB of RAM when idle. BunsenLabs provides a system that is usable out of the box but which can be tweaked any way you want. For this review I made the system cleaner and leaner but I could have gone in the opposite direction and create a desktop with conkies, panels and docks all over the place. DistroWatch's slogan, "put the fun back into computing", very much applies to BunsenLabs. In short, this is a distro I could easily use as my daily driver. My only concern would be the project's long term future. BunsenLabs Helium was released almost a year after Debian Stretch was released and then there is the worrying fact that Openbox doesn't work under Wayland, which is getting ever closer to replacing Xorg. BunsenLabs has got a sound community though, so I very much hope this distro will be around for many years to come. Read more

KaOS 2018.06

Just days after Plasma 5.13.1 was announced can you already see it on this new release. Highlights of Plasma 5.13 include optimising startup and minimising memory usage, yielding faster time-to-desktop, better runtime performance, and less memory consumption. System Settings with KDE’s Kirigami framework gives the pages a slick new look. KWin gained much-improved effects for blur and desktop switching. Wayland work continued, with the return of window rules, the use of high priority EGL Contexts, and initial support for screencasts and desktop sharing. And a tech preview of GTK global menu integration. Read more

8 reasons to use the Xfce Linux desktop environment

The Xfce desktop is thin and fast with an overall elegance that makes it easy to figure out how to do things. Its lightweight construction conserves both memory and CPU cycles. This makes it ideal for older hosts with few resources to spare for a desktop. However, Xfce is flexible and powerful enough to satisfy my needs as a power user. I've learned that changing to a new Linux desktop can take some work to configure it as I want—with all of my favorite application launchers on the panel, my preferred wallpaper, and much more. I have changed to new desktops or updates of old ones many times over the years. It takes some time and a bit of patience. I think of it like when I've moved cubicles or offices at work. Someone carries my stuff from the old office to the new one, and I connect my computer, unpack the boxes, and place their contents in appropriate locations in my new office. Moving into the Xfce desktop was the easiest move I have ever made. Read more

Programming: Go, Bugs and LLVM

  • 3 ways to copy files in Go
    This article will show you how to copy a file in the Go programming language. Although there are more than three ways to copy a file in Go, this article will present the three most common ways: using the io.Copy() function call from the Go library; reading the input file all at once and writing it to another file; and copying the file in small chunks using a buffer.
  • The life cycle of a software bug
    During the process of testing, bugs are reported to the development team. Quality assurance testers describe the bug in as much detail as possible, reporting on their system state, the processes they were undertaking, and how the bug manifested itself. Despite this, some bugs are never confirmed; they may be reported in testing but can never be reproduced in a controlled environment. In such cases they may not be resolved but are instead closed. It can be difficult to confirm a computer bug due to the wide array of platforms in use and the many different types of user behavior. Some bugs only occur intermittently or under very specific situations, and others may occur seemingly at random. Many people use and interact with open source software, and many bugs and issues may be non-repeatable or may not be adequately described. Still, because every user and developer also plays the role of quality assurance tester, at least in part, there is a good chance that bugs will be revealed.
  • LLVM's OpenMP Offloads Liboffload Into Oblivion
    The liboffload library has been dropped from LLVM's OpenMP repository. Liboffload is/was the Intel runtime library for offloading and geared for supporting the Xeon Phi co-processors. But liboffload within LLVM hasn't been receiving updates, it wasn't properly integrated within the LLVM build system, and unfortunately Xeon Phi co-processors appear to be discontinued. The liboffload library has also confused some with LLVM's libomptarget library for OpenMP support that is in much better shape.