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Funny stuff what I encountered

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OS
Software
Web

dedoimedo.com: This is going to be a clowns-quality article - sad and tragic and most likely unfunny. But some of you may yet chuckle at the contents displayed. For 'tis not just any article about funny stuff, it's one that has to do with computers and operating systems.

Facebook is a surveillance engine, not friend: Richard Stallman, Free Software Foundation

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Web

indiatimes.com: "You know about the two rules right for interviewing Richard?" a volunteer asks before leading us to meet Richard Stallman, the man who fights for free software day in and out.

DesktopLinux & LinuxDevices acquired...

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Web

DesktopLinux.com's publisher, Ziff-Davis Enterprise, has been acquired by a Californian company -- as yet undisclosed, but rumored to be Foster City-based QuinStreet. Future plans for the site have not yet been announced ...

Why I Switched To Duck Duck Go

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Web

ghacks.net: Some time ago I started to look into Google Search alternatives. This had a number of reasons, from too much noise on Google results pages over deteriorating quality to privacy concerns.

SOPA Protests: Results And Aftermath

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Web
  • Why SOPA and PIPA are bad for open source
  • SOPA a controversy against the Open Source world
  • SOPA protest by the numbers: 162M pageviews, 7 million signatures
  • SOPA Protests: Results And Aftermath
  • SOPA backer reassures his troops: "Facts will overcome fears"
  • What SOPA and PIPA could end up enabling (video)

Why I pirate

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Web
  • Why I Pirate
  • Why I'm a Pirate!
  • Tim Berners-Lee strikes out at SOPA and PIPA
  • January 18 captured: A SOPA blackout gallery
  • Nailed it: SOPA protest a sign of things to come?
  • The First Internet Strike in History a Success

Red Hat weighs in on Internet regulations

Filed under
Linux
Web

bizjournals.com: In a blog post by Red Hat’s legal team, the company says the piracy and intellectual property acts “raise enormous concerns for North Carolina home grown technology companies like Red Hat. ... Their potential effect on jobs and innovation is a matter of serious concern.”

20 Key Stages in the Evolution of the Internet

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Web
  • 20 Key Stages in the Evolution of the Internet
  • Internet 2011 in numbers
  • Linux Outlaws Black Already
  • Google to join Wednesday's anti-SOPA protest
  • Wikipedia, Other Sites to Protest Anti-Piracy Bills with Blackouts

Why openSUSE.org goes on strike tomorrow

Filed under
Web
SUSE

news.opensuse.org: End of January the US Congress will vote to pass two laws, the “PROTECT IP Act” (PIPA) and the “Stop Online Piracy Act” (SOPA). If these laws pass they would enable copyright holders to get court orders against websites accused of doing or facilitating copyright infringement.

Major Changes to Take Place to the Internet in 2012

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Web

digitizor.com: The Internet is set to witness a phenomenal change in 2012 with 5 major changes under way, having the potential to modify Internet history like never before.

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