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Linux.org comes back to life

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Web

itworld.com: After several months of reconstruction, the popular Linux.org site quietly relaunched what it terms an "alpha release" on May 4.

‘Leap Second’ Bug Wreaks Havoc Across Web

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Linux
Web

wired.com: Reddit, Mozilla, and possibly many other web outfits experienced brief technical problems on Saturday evening, when software underpinning their online operations choked on the “leap second” that was added to the world’s atomic clocks.

Gaming on Linux Up for Grabs

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Web

gamingonlinux.com: There comes a time when all good things come to an end. If someone wants to carry it on as admin and owner send me a personal message and we can work out the details.

Dear Microsoft: fsf.org is not a "gambling site"

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Microsoft
OSS
Web

fsf.org: If Microsoft's "reputation" database can't tell the difference between a gambling site and an independently audited registered nonprofit public-interest charity founded almost 30 years ago, it is certainly doing you and your business more harm than good.

Dedoimedo: I don't believe in being idle or wasting time

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Linux
Interviews
Web

darkduck.com: Linux part of Blogosphere is big. There are different people, different blogs. Some of them die, like it was with K.Mandla’s, some continue to grow. Today’s guest in my interview room is one of the most mysterious bloggers in the Linux world. Let’s talk with Dedoimedo.

Top 3 Websites To Check Whether Your Hardware Is Supported By Linux

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Linux
Hardware
Web

makeuseof.com: If you’ve ever used Linux, you’ve probably noticed that a lot of hardware works straight out of the box, no questions asked. However, no operating system will have support for every single piece of hardware out of the box.

OSHackers – Find a Linux lover near you!

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Linux
Web

unixmen.com: OSHackers is a website that aims to count GNU/Linux users and place them geographically using their Linux distribution as the marker.

How Much - and How Little - the Web Has Changed in 9 Years

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Linux
Web

readwriteweb.com: For ReadWriteWeb's ninth anniversary last week, our founder and Editor-in-Chief Richard MacManus took a loving look back at how the site has evolved over the years. But RWW isn't the only thing that has stuck around.

Linux.org on the comeback trail

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Linux
Web

itworld.com: It seems to be a bad time to be a Linux website. After a September 2011 breach on kernel.org and several other Linux Foundation web sites, it appears that community site Linux.org has been down for quite a while as well.

Is the radioactive H.264 going to poisoning us, and the web, until 2028?

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Web

Whether we like it or not, H.264 is "the" de-facto standard on the Internet. Every time you visit Youtube, you are watching a video encoded using the H.264 standard. The video quality is great, the compression is astonishing. And so is the price. H.264 is subject to a huge number of software patents. You need to pay hefty licensing fees if you want to create H.264 files today. We, the users, are not feeling this as we are not paying a cent. However, the freedoms allowed by this format are limited, and vague at best: here is why.

Read the article at Free Software Magazine.

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Patent Troll Kills Open Source Project On Speeding Up The Computation Of Erasure Codes

Via James Bessen, we learn of how a patent trolling operation by StreamScale has resulted in an open source project completely shutting down, despite the fact that the patent in question (US Patent 8,683,296 for an "Accelerated erasure coding system and method") is almost certainly ineligible for patent protection as an abstract idea, following the Supreme Court's Alice ruling and plenty of prior art. Erasure codes are used regularly today in cloud computing data storage and are considered to be rather important. Not surprisingly, companies and lawyers are starting to pop out of the woodwork to claim patents on key pieces. I won't pretend to understand the fundamental details of erasure codes, but the link above provides all the details. It goes through the specific claims in the patents, breaking down what they actually say (basically an erasure code on a computer using SIMD instructions), and how that's clearly an abstract idea and thus not patent-eligible. Read more