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Chromium 44 Beta and Firefox 38.0.5

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF
Web

Read RSS news feeds with Liferea

Filed under
Linux
Software
GNOME
Web
HowTos

Nowadays, the Internet is all about the Web. Users seem to have forgotten that it's possible to receive updates about anything that is posted on multiple web sites in seconds: this non secret is called RSS. Liferea is a neat, great piece of software that allows you to read RSS feeds and more.

http://www.freesoftwaremagazine.com/articles/read_rss_news_feeds_liferea

Watch Netflix outside the US, for nearly free (without paying for a tunnel)

Filed under
Linux
Movies
Web
HowTos

Some services line Netflix have an annoying geolocation restriction that made them unavailable outside the United States. In case of Netflix, this is due to licensing issues. It's not a slim difference: do you want to be able to access just over one thousand movies, or would you prefer to have access to over thirteen thousand movies?

OPNFV Project Gets Backing from EMC & VMware

Filed under
OSS
Web

The open source platform for Network Functions Virtualization (NFV), OPNFV Project, has received major backing from EMC and VMware. EMC joins as a Platinum member, along with others such as AT&T, Brocade, China Mobile, Cisco, Dell, Ericsson, HP, Huawei, IBM, Intel, Juniper Networks, NEC, Nokia Networks, DOCOMO, Red Hat, Telecom Italia, Vodafone and ZTE. VMware joins as a Silver member.

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Open source meets telecom at NFV World Congress

Filed under
OSS
Web

When Linux first became a serious challenger for enterprise-class infrastructure, traditional IT vendors had to contend and to rationalize just what exactly this open source thing was. The initial response from many vendors was to attempt to stop it, but it only grew.

And as open source grew, many mostly younger businesses learned to leverage it for great commercial success; however, the titans of the previous era have had challenges adapting their business models to embrace open source successfully.

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Ubuntu Finally Looks To Go With Persistent Network Interface Names

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Web
Ubuntu

While Linux distributions like Fedora and Mageia have adopted predictable/persistent network interface names, Ubuntu has not. However, that is looking to change and it might also be the case for upstream Debian.

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Routers and Linux

Filed under
Linux
Web

Linux Foundation to Host Open Encryption Project

Filed under
Linux
Web

The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux and collaborative development, today announced it will host the Internet Security Research Group (ISRG) and its Let's Encrypt project, a free, automated and open security certificate authority for the public's benefit. Let's Encrypt allows website owners to obtain security certificates within minutes, enabling a safer web experience for all.

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Meteor: An amazing free, open source Web app platform you have to try

Filed under
OSS
Web

So, you’re probably wondering what makes Meteor so damn exciting … first of all, you code in JavaScript on both the client- and the server-side. Second, Meteor is real-time even for implementing code updates for running apps. Third, it’s based on Node.js:

… a platform built on Chrome's JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications. Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices.

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Open Xchange teams with PowerDNS and Dovecot to create open source powerhouse

Filed under
Server
OSS
Web

OPEN-XCHANGE, the security conscious open source white label productivity provider from Germany, has announced a three-way merger to create one of the largest open source companies in Europe.

The deal sees the company join up with Dutch DNS software vendor PowerDNS and Finnish IMAP server provider Dovecot to form a pan-European powerhouse.

The new deal sees the combined Open-Xchange take a 90 percent market share in the secure DNS market and some 130 million user accounts.

We caught up with Open-Xchange CEO Rafael Laguna to get his thoughts on the news, starting with the advantages that the combined company will bring to the open source market.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Linux Development and LinuxCon

  • Linus Torvalds says GPL was defining factor in Linux's success
    Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel, vice president and chief of open source at VMware, discussed the role that GNU GPL played in the success of Linux during a keynote conversation this week at LinuxCon NA in Toronto. Hohndel, who has been involved with the kernel for a very long time, said that during the past 25 years there have been many challenges, and one of the biggest challenges was the possibility of fragmentation. "How do we keep one single kernel?" he asked. "I used to be worried about fragmentation, and I used to think that it was inevitable at some point," said Torvalds. “Everyone was looking at the history of Linux and comparing it with UNIX. People would say that it’s going to fail because it's going to fragment. That's what happened before, so why even bother?" What made the difference was the license. "FSF [Free Software Foundation] and I don't have a loving relationship, but I love GPL v2," said Torvalds. "I really think the license has been one of the defining factors in the success of Linux because it enforced that you have to give back, which meant that the fragmentation has never been something that has been viable from a technical standpoint."
  • Making Use Of eBPF In The Mainline Linux Kernel
    One of the exciting innovations within the Linux kernel in the past few years has been extending the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) to become a more generalized in-kernel virtual machine. The eBPF work with recent versions of the Linux kernel allow it to be used by more than just networking so that these programs can be used for tracing, security, and more.
  • Linux turns 25 with a brilliant history
    Chances are, you use it every day. Linux runs every Android phone and tablet on Earth. And even if you’re on an iPhone or a Mac or a Windows machine, Linux is working behind the scenes, across the Internet, serving up most of the webpages you view and powering most of the apps you use. Facebook, Google, Pinterest, Wikipedia—it’s all running on Linux. Now, Linux is finding its way onto televisions, thermostats, and even cars. As software creeps into practically every aspect of our lives, so does the OS designed by Linus Torvalds.
  • Intel Lost Another Open-Source Driver Developer To Google Earlier This Summer
    There was another long-time Intel open-source Linux graphics driver developer that left the company earlier this summer and is now working at Google on the Chrome/Chromium OS graphics stack. Among the notable departures in the past few months from Intel's Open-Source Technology Center were Jesse Barnes, Wayland-founder Kristian Høgsberg, and Dirk Hohndel and apparently others that went under the radar or outside of our area of focus. Another graphics driver developer no longer at Intel is Chad Versace.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 For Haswell Lands With Intel's Mesa Driver